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Oral Histories

The Oral History Inventory was compiled fall 2008/spring 2009 by Tim Obert, School of Library and Information Science student, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill


Introduction to the Inventory

This inventory is a compilation of primarily oral histories, panel discussions and radio interviews that are about Durham or feature people from Durham. Most of the materials are from Duke University, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Durham County Library, WUNC Radio and Preservation Durham. The inventory has four sections:

Search the inventory using the search feature of your browser (Ctrl+F)

Contact Lynn Richardson, North Carolina Collection librarian, with all additions and corrections.


Individual Interviews in Alphabetical Order by Last Name

ABCDEF – G – H – I – JKLMNO
P – Q – RST – U – V – W – X – Y – Z


A

Nancy Allen

Title: Oral history interview with Nancy Allen, 2006
Author: Allen, Nancy, 1952-
Interviewed by Jessica Roseberry in Durham, N.C. on November 10, 2006
Location: Duke: Medical Center Library
Call Number: Oral History Collection Allen, 11/10/2006, Transcript, CD1
Format: Contains audiotapes and transcript of an oral history interview.
Description: Duke University Special Assistant to the Provost for Faculty Diversity and Faculty Development and a member of the Division of Rheumatology and Immunology.
Contains audiotapes and transcript of an oral history interview. Major subjects in this interview include women’s issues in the medical field, including Allen’s own experiences as a female staff member in the Duke University Medical Center Department of Medicine’s Division of Rheumatology; Dr. Joseph Greenfield, and Dr. Nannerl O. Keohane.
Subjects:
Allen, Nancy–1952-
Duke University
Duke University–Medical Center
Duke University–Medical Center–Dept of Medicine
Faculty, Medical
Greenfield, Joseph C
History of Medicine–North Carolina–Personal Narratives
Keohane, Nannerl O,–1940-
Rheumatology
Women in medicine

Macky Alston

Title: Family name [videorecording]
Author:
Opelika Pictures presents a film by Macky Alston ; producer, Selina Lewis ; directed by Macky Alston.
Alston, Macky.
Docurama (Firm)
Gayner, Kay.
Lewis, Selina.
Opelika Pictures.
Publisher: [United States] : Docurama, 2008.
Location: Duke University: Lily Library
Call Number: A-V DVD DVD 11894
Format: Video DVD
Description: As a child growing up in Durham, North Carolina, Macky Alston never questioned why all the other Alstons in his school were black. Now, after twenty-five years, he has gone back to unravel the mystery. In this documentary of race relations, Alston travels to family reunions, picnics, housing projects, churches, graveyards & the original Alston plantations to find people who share his family name.
Subjects:
Alston family
Chatham County (NC.)–Race relations–Case studies.
Family–Southern States–Case studies
Identity (Psychology)–Southern States–Case studies
Southern States–Race relations–Case studies
Web address: http://search.trln.org/search?id=DUKE004038076


B

Annie Mack Barbee

Title: Oral history interview with Annie Mack Barbee, May 28, 1979 [electronic resource] : interview H-0190, Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007).
Author: Barbee, Annie Mack, 1913?-
Other Author: Jones, Beverly Washington, 1948- Interviewer.

Publisher: [Chapel Hill, N.C.] : University Library, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2008.
Location: Documenting the American South (website)
Call Number: http://docsouth.unc.edu/sohp/H-0190/menu.html
Format: internet resource (full text and audio)
Description: Ann Mack Barbee’s family lived as sharecroppers in South Carolina for much of her childhood. Barbee describes her parents’ values and how they passed those along to their children. She relates how her life changed following her mother’s death as she assumed greater responsibility in the household. When Barbee was an adolescent, the family decided to leave the countryside and go to Durham to work in the factories. In Durham, Barbee went to work in the Liggett & Myers tobacco factories. The overall environment of the tobacco factories harmed the women’s health, but Barbee explains how segregation and racism worsened conditions even further. She lists the reasons she did not strongly support the unions and then reflects on the many differences race made in her life, even affecting the color of uniform she wore. Using an illustration from her own work experience, Barbee insists that African American women must learn to stand for themselves, refusing to give up their rights even when the white men in authority demand it. Because her father feared that she would be sexually assaulted on the walk to and from school, he forced Barbee to quit school before she wanted to do so. She describes how she tried to continue her own education even after she stopped attending classes. She reflects on the opportunities African American children had to further their education and the pressure they felt to succeed. Barbee did not marry until she was in her early forties; she bore a daughter, Louise, a short time later. She describes how being an older mother made her a different parent and explains her basic parenting philosophies.
Time: 2:08:38
Subjects:
Barbee, Annie Mack, 1913?- — Interviews.
Women tobacco workers — North Carolina — Durham — Interviews.
African American women — North Carolina — Durham — Interviews.
Farm life — South Carolina.
Liggett & Myers Tobacco Company.
Durham (N.C.)

Charles Becton

Title: Interview with Charles Becton
Author:
Pamela Foster.
Becton, Charles L.
Foster, Pamela.
Law School Oral History Project (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. School of Law.
Publisher: [Chapel Hill, N.C.] : University of North Carolina, c1994.
Location: UNC – Chapel Hill Libraries: Law Library
Call Number: KFN7925 .B43 1994
Format: Photocopy of Transcript of interview
Description: 81 leaves ; 28 cm.
Note: Photocopy of the original typewritten transcript of the taped interview of Charles L. Becton at his home in Durham, North Carolina on February 6, 1994 and February 20, 1994.
Subjects:
Becton, Charles — Interviews.
Becton, Charles.
Lawyers — North Carolina — Interviews.
Judges — North Carolina — Interviews.

MaryAnn Black

Title: Oral history interview with MaryAnn Black, 2004
Author: Black, Mary Ann.
Interviewed by Jessica Roseberry in Durham, N.C. on Jan. 22, 2004.
Location: Duke: Medical Center Library
Call Number: Oral History Collection, 7c Black, 1/22/05, Tape 1
Format: Contains audiotapes and transcript of an oral history interview recorded on cassette tapes.
Description: Associate vice president for Community Affairs for the Duke University Health System.
Contains audiotapes and transcript of an oral history interview recorded on cassette tapes. Major subjects in this interview include her family background, career in social work, public service, Durham (N.C.), Duke University Health System, hiring of minority group members, Dr. Ralph Snyderman, and the Duke University Office of Community Affairs.
Subjects:
Black, Mary Ann E.
Snyderman, Ralph.
Duke University Health System.
Duke University.–Office of Community Affairs.
Minority Groups.
Durham (N.C.)
History of Medicine–North Carolina–Personal Narratives.

W. Bryan Bolich

Title: W Bryan Bolich papers, 1891-1972.
Author: Bolich, W. Bryan, 1896-1977.
Location: Duke University Archives: Library Service Center (Reading Room only)
Call Number: Box 1 c.1 – 8 c.1]
Web address: Finding Aid: http://library.duke.edu/digitalcollections/rbmscl/uabolich/inv/
Format: Manuscript.
Description: William Bryan Bolich (1896-1977) served as a Professor of Law at Duke University from 1927 to 1966.
Papers contain family memorabilia, general correspondence, photographs, an oral history, diaries, course notes, writings, drafts of statutes revisions, and clippings. Major subjects include family work at Southern Railway in Forsyth County, N.C., Duke Law School curriculum development and reorganization, Law Day, the Rhodes Scholarship, Trinity College Class of 1917 alumni activities, Law School Alumni Association, North Carolina House of Representatives, and property and alien rights laws authored with the North Carolina General Statute Commission. Some of the correspondence is between Bolich and Richard Nixon. The material ranges in date from 1891-1972.
Subjects:
Bolich family
Bolich, W Bryan,–1896-1977
Duke University–History–20th century
Duke University–School of Law
Duke University–School of Law–Alumni and alumnae
Duke University–School of Law–Faculty
Duke University–School of Law–Study and teaching
Nixon, Richard M–(Richard Milhous)–1913-1994–Correspondence
North Carolina–General Assembly–House of Representatives
North Carolina–General Statutes Commission
Southern Railway (US)
Trinity College (Durham, NC)–History–20th century

H. Keith Brodie

Title: Oral history interview with H. Keith H. Brodie, 2004.
Author: Brodie, H. Keith H. (Harlow Keith Hammond), 1939-
Location: Duke: Medical Center Library
Call Number: Oral History Collection, 7c Brodie, 6/17/2004, Tape 1, Tape 2, Transcript
Format: Contains audiotapes and transcript of an oral history interview recorded on cassette tapes.
Description: Former chair of the Department of Psychiatry (1974-1982), chancellor, and president of Duke University (1985-1993).
Contains audiotapes and transcript of an oral history interview recorded on cassette tapes. Major subjects in this interview include students, Terry Sanford, Ralph Snyderman, Ewald W. Busse, American Psychiatric Association, veterans’ health care, drug testing, and Duke University administration.
Subjects:
American Psychiatric Association
Brodie, H Keith H–(Harlow Keith Hammond),–1939-
Busse, Ewald W,–1917-
Duke University
Duke University–Dept of Psychiatry
Duke University–Medical Center
History of Medicine–North Carolina–Personal Narratives
Hospitals, Veterans
Physicians–Interview
Sanford, Terry–1917-1998
Snyderman, Ralph
Substance Abuse Detection

Thomas Burt

Title: Oral history interview with Thomas Burt, February 6, 1979 [electronic resource] : interview H-0194-2, Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007).
Author: Burt, Thomas, 1900-1987. Interviewee
Other Author: Hinson, Glenn, Interviewer.
Publisher: [Chapel Hill, N.C.] : University Library, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2008.
Location: Documenting the American South (website)
Call Number: http://docsouth.unc.edu/sohp/H-0194-2/menu.html
Format: internet resource (full text and audio)
Description: Thomas Burt’s wide array of jobs in and around Durham, North Carolina, ranged from working on a streetcar line to farming. Although he worked for only eighteen months in a tobacco factory, most of this interview is devoted to his experiences there. His descriptions of the factory contain many interesting and valuable details, from the lunchboxes full of irregularly cut cigarettes he and his fellow workers brought home after their shifts, to the swirling clouds of tobacco dust that would settle under feet and eventually become snuff, to the spirituals and blues songs the workers sang to pass the time. This interview provides a rich look at the tobacco industry in Durham in the first half of the twentieth century, as well as a portrait of a colorful character.
Time: 1:20:51
Subjects:
Burt, Thomas, 1900-1987 — Interviews.
Tobacco workers — North Carolina — Durham — Interviews.
African American men — North Carolina — Durham — Interviews.
Blue collar workers — North Carolina — Durham — Interviews.
Tobacco workers — Employment — North Carolina — Durham.
Tobacco industry — North Carolina — Durham.
Tobacco workers — North Carolina — Durham — Social life and customs.


C

Rebecca Clayton

Title: Oral history interview with Rebecca Clayton, December 8, 1988 [electronic resource] : interview K-0132, Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007).
Author: Clayton, Rebecca, 1939-. Interviewee
Other Author: Hornsby-Gutting, Angela, Interviewer.
Publisher: [Chapel Hill, N.C.] : University Library, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2008.
Location: Documenting the American South (website)
Call Number: http://docsouth.unc.edu/sohp/K-0132/menu.html
Format: internet resource (full text and audio)
Description: Rebecca Clayton grew up in Madison County, Virginia, during the 1940s and 1950s in a family that greatly valued education. After offering her brief reflections on her family background and her childhood experiences, Clayton shifts her attention to a discussion of her career as a teacher. Clayton earned her degree in education from Longwood College (1958-1960) in Prince Edward County, Virginia. During her years there, Clayton witnessed upheaval within the community as the public schools closed in opposition to mounting pressure to desegregate. For Clayton, a young teacher in training, the tensions she witnessed during those years were especially formative for her developing belief that racial tolerance, particularly when it came to education, was imperative. During the 1960s, Clayton relocated to Durham, North Carolina, and worked briefly in the library at Duke University. In 1970, she returned to teaching, initially working as a substitute teacher in the Durham school district. Clayton’s return to teaching coincided with the integration of Durham schools. That same year, a long-term substitute job became a five-year position at North Durham Elementary School. According to Clayton, the newly desegregated school was characterized by chaos and tension between students when she first arrived, although she emphasizes the efforts of teachers and school officials to promote understanding and to foster a sense of pride in the students. Clayton suggests that tensions were diminishing when she left North Durham to teach at Fayetteville Street Elementary School in 1975. She also notes, though, that white flight to the suburbs was beginning to drastically impact the racial composition of Durham public schools. As a result, Clayton had taught significantly more African American students than white students by the time of the interview in 1998. Clayton devotes the final thirty minutes of the interview to a discussion of her work at Eastway Elementary school during the mid-1990s. During those years, the Latino population had begun to grow at a rapid rate. Clayton discusses how that affected student interactions and school curriculum. In particular, Clayton focuses on the challenges of teaching students whose first language was not English and describes various ways in which the school sought to build bridges to the broader community. Although she laments the fact that the growing emphasis on test scores inhibited teachers’ efforts to focus on cultural learning, she argues that the students were not dissuaded by cultural barriers when it came to forming friendships or helping one another learn. She concludes the interview by arguing that her thirty years of experience in Durham were mostly positive.
Time: 1:15:20
Subjects:
Clayton, Rebecca, 1939- — Interviews.
Women teachers — North Carolina — Durham — Interviews.
Elementary schools — North Carolina — Durham.
School integration — North Carolina — Durham.
Multicultural education — North Carolina — Durham.
Hispanic Americans — Education — North Carolina — Durham.
Durham (N.C.) — Race relations.

Josephine Clement

Title: Oral history interview with Josephine Clement, July 13 and August 3, 1989 [electronic resource] : interview C-0074, Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007).
Author: Clement, Josephine. Interviewee
Other Author: Nasstrom, Kathryn L, Interviewer.
Publisher: [Chapel Hill, N.C.] : University Library, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2008.
Location: Documenting the American South (website)
Call Number: http://docsouth.unc.edu/sohp/C-0074/menu.html
Format: internet resource (full text and audio)
Description: Josephine Dobbs Clement (1918-1998) was one of six daughters born to Irene Ophelia Thompson Dobbs and John Wesley Dobbs. Her father was a prominent businessman in Atlanta, Georgia. Clement received her bachelor’s degree from Spelman College in 1937 and her master’s from Columbia University the following year. In the late 1940s, she moved with her husband, William A. Clement, to Durham, North Carolina, where she was active in local politics and social justice movements. In this interview, she describes how her father instilled within her a sense of justice and the tools to protest inequality. In keeping with this heritage, when she arrived in Durham, she quickly became active in the YWCA and the League of Women’s Voters, helping to desegregate both of them. Throughout the interview, she maintains that her identities as a woman and an African American could not and should not be fractured. Rather, she argues, true freedom will only come when both racial and gender hierarchies are destroyed. Though her husband became politically active during the 1960s, she did not do so to the same extent. Instead, she participated in activities that concerned her children and became involved in her community through those outlets. Eventually, these activities led to an appointment to the Durham City-County Charter Commission. After that, she ran for a seat on the city’s board of education. During her time on the board, the courts ordered the city schools to desegregate, a change which prompted white flight and drastically altered the racial composition of the city. For a time, she chaired the board, and under her leadership, the city selected its first African American superintendent of schools. After a decade of working with the board of education, Clement decided to resign, and she became a county commissioner. Clement believes that her various civic roles have allowed her to accomplish some of the social change she desired, though she sees more that needs to occur. At the end of the interview, Clement explains how she tries to balance her concerns for social justice, her interest in environmental issues and her pragmatic recognition that new building in Durham is inevitable. After this interview was completed, Clement remained politically active and even co-chaired the successful gubernatorial campaigns of Democrat James Hunt in Durham County in 1980 and 1984.
Time: 1:46:33
Subjects:
Clement, Josephine — Interviews.
African American women civil rights workers — North Carolina — Durham — Interviews.
African American politicians — North Carolina — Durham — Interviews.
Women local officials and employees — North Carolina — Durham — Interviews.
Durham (N.C.) — Politics and government.
Durham County (N.C.) — Politics and government.
Durham (N.C.) — Race relations.
School integration — North Carolina — Durham.
Education, Secondary — North Carolina — Durham.
School boards — African American membership — North Carolina — Durham.
African Americans — Civil rights — North Carolina — Durham.

William and Josephine Clement

Title: Oral history interview with William and Josephine Clement, June 19, 1986 [electronic resource] : interview C-0031, Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007).
Author: Clement, William A., 1912-. Interviewee
Other Author: Weare, Walter B, Interviewer.
Weare, Juanita, Interviewer.
Publisher: [Chapel Hill, N.C.] : University Library, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2008.
Location: Documenting the American South (website)
Call Number: http://docsouth.unc.edu/sohp/C-0031/menu.html
Format: internet resource (full text and audio)
Description: William and Josephine Clement were married in 1941 and first moved to Durham, North Carolina, during the 1940s. Both were born and raised in the South, had always been strong advocates for racial progress, and quickly became involved in community organizations, particularly in support of school integration. Josephine eventually was elected to the Durham City Board of Education in the early 1970s and became increasingly involved in local politics after that. In this interview, both Josephine and William discuss their family histories and cover a broad range of topics while doing so. Josephine speaks at great length about her experiences growing up in Atlanta, Georgia, during the 1920s and 1930s. She emphasizes the examples her parents set for her and her sisters. She explains her father’s inclination towards radical politics, his efforts to challenge and break racial barriers, and the presence of strong African American woman role models. In addition, she describes her own education and her strong dedication to her family. William likewise describes his family background, but focuses more on his involvement with the Masons and his work with North Carolina Mutual. Throughout the interview, the Clements stress the importance of confidence and self-esteem for African Americans, as well as the importance of group solidarity in achieving progress for changing race relations.
Time: 3:10:11
Subjects:
Clement, Josephine — Interviews.
Clement, William A., 1912- — Interviews.
African American women civic leaders — North Carolina — Durham — Interviews.
African American executives — North Carolina — Durham — Interviews.
Durham (N.C.) — Race relations.
African Americans — Civil rights — North Carolina — Durham.
North Carolina Mutual Life Insurance Company.
African American business enterprises — North Carolina — Durham.
Atlanta (Ga.) — Race relations.
Civil rights movements — Georgia — Atlanta.
African Americans — Segregation — Southern States.

Paul Clyde

Title: Paul Clyde Papers, 1927-1998 [manuscript]
Author: Clyde, Mary Kestler. Clyde, Paul Hibbert, 1896-
Location: Duke: Special Collections Library
Web address: finding aid: http://library.duke.edu/digitalcollections/rbmscl/clyde/inv/
Call Number: 2nd 50:F Acc. 99/354: Box 1 c.1,2nd 13:B Acc. 90/093: Box , 1 2nd 69:J Box 1 – Box 33, 6th 20:A Sm. Colls. Boxes 2, 3 Acc. 2-24-87: Folder 1, c.1 – Folder 5, 2nd 69:K Box 1 – Box 13
Format: Manuscript: transcript
Description: Professor of history, Duke University, Durham, N.C.
The papers of Dr. Paul Clyde, who was a Duke University professor of history, contain a transcript of Dr. Clyde’s oral history tape regarding his tenure with Duke, as well as his tenure as director of the Educational Division of the Duke Endowment. There is also a description by Mrs. Clyde relating to the launching and operating of the administrative areas of the Woman’s College (Duke University) in which she worked; information about her service as president of the Woman’s College Alumnae Association, (1966-67); and the initiation that year of the idea of a Continuing Education Program at Duke.
Subjects:
China–History–1928-1937
China–Religion
Clyde, Paul Hibbert–1896-
College teachers–Correspondence
Duke Endowment
Duke University–History–20th century
Duke University–Woman’s College
Japan–Foreign relations–20th century
Japan–History–1912-1945
Keenleyside, Hugh Llewellyn–1898-
Manchuria (China)–History–1931-1945
Semans, James H
Semans, Mary Duke Biddle Trent
Sino-Japanese War, 1937-1945
Unitarian churches–Florida–20th century


D

Julia Peaks de-Heer

Title: Oral history interview with Julia Peaks de-Heer, January 8, 1999 [electronic resource] : interview K-0146, Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007).
Author: De-Heer, Julia Peaks, 1946-. Interviewee
Other Author: Hemming, Jill, Interviewer.
Publisher: [Chapel Hill, N.C.] : University Library, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2008.
Location: Documenting the American South (website)
Call Number: http://docsouth.unc.edu/sohp/K-0146/menu.html
Format: internet resource (full text and audio)
Description: Julia Peaks de-Heer spent her early childhood years in Stagville, North Carolina, before moving to Hopkins Street in Durham, North Carolina, during the early 1950s. Her father’s new job at the Nello Teer Construction Company spurred the move, and de-Heer initially felt distraught over leaving the countryside. Nevertheless, she quickly felt at home in her neighborhood on Hopkins Street, largely because of the close-knit sense of community that developed among her neighbors. In addition to describing some of the activities, foodways, and the work of community leaders, de-Heer spends much of the interview discussing the role of the Greater Zion Wall Church, which was founded and built by the community members during her childhood. According to de-Heer, the community began to decline several years later when some of the homes were turned into boarding houses. The portrait she paints of Hopkins Street by the 1990s contrasts sharply with the neighborhood she knew in her childhood. After spending some time in Washington, D.C., and Virginia during the 1960s and 1970s, de-Heer returned to North Carolina in 1980 and began to attend the Greater Zion Wall Church again. de-Heer devotes the final third of the interview to a discussion of her continuing work with that church and her visions for its role in community improvement, focusing on the church’s efforts to help disadvantaged children in the community and their growing efforts to bridge divisions between the African Americans in the neighborhood and the rapidly growing Latino population. Researchers should take note that this interview is divided into two parts, with the second part occurring three months after the first. As a result, there is some repetition and variation in de-Heer’s recollections.
Time: 2:10:02
Subjects: De-Heer, Julia Peaks, 1946- — Interviews.
African American women — North Carolina — Durham.
African American neighborhoods — North Carolina — Durham.
Community development — North Carolina — Durham.
African Americans — North Carolina — Durham — Social life and customs.
African American women in church work — North Carolina — Durham.
Greater Zion Wall Church (Durham, North Carolina)
African Americans — North Carolina — Durham — Relations with Hispanic Americans.
Durham (N.C.) — Social conditions — 21st century.
Durham (N.C.) — Race relations.

Allyson Duncan

Title: Interview with Allyson Duncan
Author:
Mary Leazer-Rogers.
Duncan, Allyson K.
Law School Oral History Project (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)
Leazer-Rogers, Mary.
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. School of Law.
Publisher: [Chapel Hill, N.C.] : University of North Carolina, c1995.
Location: UNC – Chapel Hill Libraries: Law Library
Call Number: KFN7926.A8 D85 1995
Format: Photocopy of Transcript of interview
Item Description:
67 leaves ; 28 cm.
OCLC Number: 36853890
Notes:“Law School Oral History Project, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.”
“Original transcript on deposit at the Southern Historical Collection, Louis Round Wilson Library.”
Photocopy of the original typewritten transcript of the taped interview of Allyson K. Duncan at her home in Durham, N.C. on October 20, 1994 and October 27, 1994.
Subjects:
Duncan, Allyson K.
Duncan, Allyson K.–Interviews.
Lawyers–North Carolina–Interviews.
Minority women lawyers–North Carolina–Interviews.

Martina Dunford

Title: Oral history interview with Martina Dunford, February 18, 1999 [electronic resource] : interview K-0142, Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007).
Author: Dunford, Martina, 1956-. Interviewee
Other Author: Rouverol, Alicia J., 1961- Interviewer.
Publisher: [Chapel Hill, N.C.] : University Library, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2008.
Location: Documenting the American South (website)
Call Number: http://docsouth.unc.edu/sohp/K-0142/menu.html
Format: internet resource (full text and audio)
Description: Martina Dunford moved to Durham, North Carolina, in 1991. A graduate student at North Carolina Central, Dunford began to work for the Edgemont Community Center and had become the program director at the time of the interview in 1999. She begins the interview with a brief history of the Edgemont Community Center, which was founded in the early 1940s. From there, she begins to describe the characteristics of the community, which was predominantly African American, and some of the changes within the community she had witnessed over the course of the 1990s. In particular, Dunford focuses on some of the remaining obstacles that prevented people in the community from achieving true equality of opportunity, which she partially attributes to lingering cultural differences. In addition, Dunford discusses how the rapidly growing Latino population in Durham during the 1990s complicated dynamics within the community. While she does not identify any overt tensions between African Americans and Latinos in Edgemont, she does indicate that both communities remained largely isolated from one another. Dunford describes some of the efforts of the Edgemont Community Center towards rectifying those divisions, arguing that building a sense of rapport between different groups of people was the first crucial step. In addition, Dunford describes the various measures the center took to provide children in the community with opportunities they would otherwise have been denied. In addition to outlining the character of the community and lingering obstacles to solidarity, Dunford also offers memories of her childhood in Norfolk, Virginia. After describing the importance of education, the role of religion, and experiences with racial discrimination during her childhood and early adult years, Dunford argues that she was shocked by the “blatant” racism she witnessed upon moving to Durham and the challenges it posed for the work of the Edgemont Community Center.
Time:1:17:57
Subjects:
Dunford, Martina, 1956- — Interviews.
African American women civic leaders — North Carolina — Durham — Interviews.
Community activists — North Carolina — Durham — Interviews.
Community development — North Carolina — Durham.
Community centers — North Carolina — Durham.
African American neighborhoods — North Carolina — Durham.
African Americans — North Carolina — Durham — Social conditions.
Durham (N.C.) — Race relations.
African Americans — North Carolina — Durham — Relations with Hispanic Americans.
Cultural pluralism — United States.


E

E. Harvey Estes — 2004

Title: Oral history interview with E Harvey Estes, 2004.
Author: Estes, E. Harvey (Edward Harvey), 1925-
Location: Duke: Medical Center Library
Call Number: Oral History Collection, 7c Estes, 4/28/2004, Tape 1, Tape 2, Transcript
Format: Contains audiotapes and transcript of an oral history interview recorded on cassette tapes.
Description: Subjects include Duke University Medical Center, Durham (N.C.), Department of Community and Family Medicine, and certain restricted topics.
Subjects:
Estes, Edward Harvey–1925-
Duke University.
Duke University.–Dept. of Community and Family Medicine.
History of Medicine–North Carolina–Personal Narratives.
Physicians–Interview.

E. Harvey Estes — 2007

Title: Oral history interview with E Harvey Estes, 2007.
Author: Estes, E. Harvey (Edward Harvey), 1925-
Location: Online Exhibit, Transcript, Audio clip
Formats: Internet resource; Manuscript
Description: Contains CD and transcript of an oral history interview with E. Harvey Estes. Major subjects in this interview include his experiences in Duke’s Department of Community and Family Medicine and the women he worked with, including Dr. Grace Kerby, Dr. Eva Salber, and Bess Cebe.
Subjects:
Estes, Edward Harvey–1925-
Duke University.
Duke University.–Medical Center.
Duke University.–Dept. of Community and Family Medicine.
History of Medicine–North Carolina–Personal Narratives.
Physicians–Interview.
Women in Medicine.

Kathrine Robinson Everett — 1985

Title: Oral history interview with Kathrine Robinson Everett, April 30, 1985 [electronic resource] : interview C-0005, Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007).
Author: Everett, Kathrine R. (Kathrine Robinson), 1893-1992, Interviewee.
Other author: Dean, Pamela, Interviewer.
Publisher:[Chapel Hill, N.C.] : University Library, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2006.
Location: Southern Oral History Program Collection, (#4007), Series C, notable North Carolinians, interview C-0005, Manuscripts Department, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Original transcript: 32 p.
Call Number: http://docsouth.unc.edu/sohp/C-0005/menu.html
Summary: Kathrine Robinson Everett was born in Fayetteville, North Carolina, in 1894 into a Carolina family. A pioneer in women’s education, Everett was educated at Columbia and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, among other schools. In 1920, she became one of the first women to graduate from the UNC-CH law school and was ranked at the top of her class. In the 1920s, Everett practiced law with her father and worked to register women voters in Cumberland County. Following her marriage in 1926 and the birth of her son, Robinson, in 1928, Everett devoted her time to local politics. Among the things she discusses are her efforts to combine work and family.
Time: 01:05:13.
Subjects:
Everett, Kathrine R. (Kathrine Robinson), 1893-1992 — Interviews.
Women lawyers — North Carolina — Interviews.
Women lawyers — North Carolina — Biography.
Women politicians — North Carolina — Interviews.
Women’s rights — North Carolina.
Women in politics — North Carolina.
Women — Suffrage — North Carolina.
Voter registration — North Carolina.
Families — North Carolina — Social life and customs.
Chapel Hill (N.C.) — Social life and customs.
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. School of Law.

Kathrine Robinson Everett — 1986

Title: Oral history interview with Kathrine Robinson Everett, January 21, 1986 [electronic resource] : interview C-0006, Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007).
Author: Everett, Kathrine R. (Kathrine Robinson), 1893-1992. Interviewee
Other Author: Dean, Pamela, Interviewer.
Publisher: [Chapel Hill, N.C.] : University Library, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2008.
Location: Documenting the American South (website)
Call Number: http://docsouth.unc.edu/sohp/C-0006/menu.html
Format: internet resource (full text and audio)
Description: Kathrine Robinson Everett recalls a career as a trailblazing female lawyer and women’s rights activist, though she rejects the title of pioneer. Robinson seized on the new opportunities available for women during World War I, securing a legal education while many men were abroad fighting. Her education and upbringing shaped her belief that women deserve equal treatment in work and life, a belief that drove her to join the women’s movement, push for the Equal Rights Amendment, and join city politics in Durham, North Carolina. This interview offers researchers a perspective on the seeds of activism and, through one experience, the public lives of women in the twentieth century.
Time: 1:25:23
Subjects:
Everett, Kathrine R. (Kathrine Robinson), 1893-1992 — Interviews.
Women lawyers — North Carolina — Interviews.
Women lawyers — North Carolina — Biography.
Women politicians — North Carolina — Interviews.
Women’s rights — North Carolina.
Women in politics — North Carolina.
Women — Suffrage — North Carolina.
Voter registration — North Carolina.
Families — North Carolina — Social life and customs.
Chapel Hill (N.C.) — Social life and customs.
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. School of Law.


F

S.J. and Leonia Farrar

Title: Oral history interview with S. J. and Leonia Farrar, May 28, 2003 [electronic resource] : interview K-0652, Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007).
Author: Farrar, S. J. (Samuel James), 1927-2007. Interviewee
Other Author: Van Scoyoc, Peggy, Interviewer.
Publisher: [Chapel Hill, N.C.] : University Library, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2008.
Location: Documenting the American South (website)
Call Number: http://docsouth.unc.edu/sohp/K-0652/menu.html
Format: internet resource (full text and audio)
Description: This interview is a chronicle of a lifetime of hard work. Samuel and Leonia Farrar both grew up in poverty in rural Chatham County, North Carolina, although Samuel’s family was poorer than Leonia’s. Samuel tried to follow his father into the sharecropping business, but became so frustrated with his treatment by his white landlord he left his farm and tried to make his way in Durham, marrying Leonia in 1949 and taking her with him. By 1951, homesick and overworked, Samuel and Leonia returned to farm life. But racism drove the couple from their rented farmland, and in 1957 Farrar built the Cary home where the interview took place in 2003. The Farrars reflect upon their lives in this interview, recalling decades of manual labor, saving money, raising a family, and enduring racial discrimination from landlords, coworkers, and others. Their hard work, always a source of pride, eventually offered other rewards as well: Samuel became a minister, eventually supervising twenty-three churches, and after years of work as a beautician, Leonia found her calling in charitable work.
Time: 1:29:20
Subjects:
Farrar, S. J. (Samuel James), 1927-2007 — Interviews.
African Americans — North Carolina — Interviews.
African American farmers — North Carolina — Chatham County — Social conditions.
African Americans — North Carolina — Cary — Social conditions.
Farm life — North Carolina — Chatham County.
Farrar, Leonia — Interviews.

John Hope Franklin

Title: Oral History Interview with John Hope Franklin, July 27, 1990. Interview A-0339. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007).
Author: John Hope Franklin, Interviewee
Publisher: [Chapel Hill, N.C.] : University Library, UNC-Chapel Hill, 1990.
Location: Documenting the American South (website)
Call Number: http://docsouth.unc.edu/sohp/A-0339/menu.html
Format: internet resource (full text and audio)
Description: John Hope Franklin, legendary African American historian, shares some of his recollections from his early life in this interview, including his time spent as chairman of student government at Fisk, teaching at North Carolina College, and his record with the Southern Historical Association. The interviewer proposes some theses about race and history in the American South, and he and Franklin discuss various figures who flitted in and out of Franklin’s life, and in and out of southern politics and activism. While Franklin does not offer any lengthy thoughts on race or civil rights in the South, the interview does provide insightful anecdotes about the storied lives of Franklin and his contemporaries.
Time: 1 hr.
Subjects:
North Carolina–Race relations
African Americans–Political activity
Tennessee–Race relations
African American college teachers

Howard Fuller

Title: Oral history interview with Howard Fuller, December 14, 1996 [electronic resource] : interview O-0034, Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007).
Author: Fuller, Howard, 1941-
Publisher: [Chapel Hill, N.C.] : University Library, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2008.
Location: Documenting the American South (website)
Call Number: http://docsouth.unc.edu/sohp/O-0034/menu.html
Format: internet resource (full text and audio)
Description: The North Carolina Fund, a forerunner to President Lyndon Johnson’s War on Poverty, served as a bold experiment in fostering cooperation between government agencies and the private sector during the early 1960s. Along with federal, state, and institutional support, the Fund relied on the support of volunteers. Between 1963 and 1968, over 350 student volunteers traveled to rural and urban communities across North Carolina to help implement the Fund’s initiatives. Howard Fuller worked as a community organizer in Durham, North Carolina, setting up neighborhood councils as sounding boards for neighborhoods’ problems. His experiences with low-income black residents shaped his lifelong work and involvement in anti-poverty campaigns. Fuller came to realize the importance of training local residents to become economically self-sufficient and politically active in order to effect long-lasting structural changes in United States society. In 1968, he helped establish the Malcolm X Liberation University in Durham. After the University’s decline, Fuller moved to Wisconsin, where he served as the superintendent for the Milwaukee public schools from 1991 to 1995. In 1995, Fuller resigned and founded the Institute for the Transformation of Learning (ITL) at Marquette University to provide assistance to charter schools. Fuller’s support of parental choice and school vouchers confused his former activist allies, but remained consistent with his belief that local communities best obtain equitable resources with political power and choice. Because policymakers’ memory of the North Carolina Fund increasingly began to fade, Dr. James Leloudis, of the Department of History at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and Dr. Robert Korstad, of Duke University’s Sanford Institute of Public Policy, designed an oral history course titled “Race, Poverty, and the North Carolina Fund and Its Legacy” in the fall of 1996. Drs. Leloudis and Korstad developed the “No Easy Walk” conference composed from students’ interviews with former Fund participants and current policymakers. Fuller gave the closing speech at the conference on December 14, 1996. He offered suggestions on how to inspire continued and increased activism among the younger and older generations. Fuller’s remarks reflect his beliefs about the connection between economic and political power.
Time: 0:51:11
Subjects:
Fuller, Howard, 1941-
African American social reformers — North Carolina — Attitudes.
African American political activists — North Carolina — Attitudes.
Social justice.
Economic assistance, Domestic.
Educational vouchers.


H

Charles B. Hammond

Title: Oral history interview with Charles B Hammond, 2004.
Author: Hammond, Charles B. (Charles Bessellieu), 1936-
Location: Duke: Medical Center Library
Call Number: Oral History Collection, 7c Hammond, 6/2/2004, Tape 1, Tape 2, Transcript
Format: Contains audiotapes and transcript of an oral history interview recorded on cassette tapes.
Description: Major subjects in this interview include obstetrics and gynecology teaching and instruction, the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Duke University Medical Center, Duke University School of Medicine, administration, faculty, students, and history of medicine in North Carolina.
Subjects:
Hammond, Charles B.–(Charles Bessellieu)–1936-
Duke University.–School of Medicine.
Duke University.–Dept. of Obstetrics and Gynecology.
Obstetrics.
Gynecology.
Physicians–Interview.
History of Medicine–North Carolina–Personal Narratives.

Adetola Hassan

Title: Oral history interview with Adetola Hassan, December 16, 2001 [electronic resource] : interview R-0160, Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007).
Author: Hassan, Adetola, 1984?-. Interviewee
Other Author: Copeland, Barbara Anne, Interviewer.
Publisher: [Chapel Hill, N.C.] : University Library, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2008.
Location: Documenting the American South (website)
Call Number: http://docsouth.unc.edu/sohp/R-0160/menu.html
Format: internet resource (full text and audio)
Description: Adetola Hassan is a British citizen of Nigerian descent who grew up in Great Britain, Saudi Arabia, and Nigeria during the 1980s and early 1990s. She moved to the United States during the mid-1990s to live with her uncle in Missouri, and at the time of the interview in 2001 was a seventeen-year-old freshman at Duke University in Durham, North Carolina. Hassan begins the interview with a discussion of her family’s conversion to Mormonism and their practice of that faith in Great Britain, Saudi Arabia, and Nigeria. Although she focuses on some of the obstacles her family faced in practicing Mormonism in those countries, she argues that it was not until she attended a Presbyterian school in Missouri that she “experienced intense hatred of the church.” She was ultimately forced to leave the school because she refused to renounce her belief in Mormonism. Hassan’s recollections are revealing of some of the tensions between the Mormon Church and other Christian denominations in the South. Hassan also spends considerable time offering her thoughts on various practices within the Mormon Church, including the temple recommend and baptism of the dead. Additionally, she explains what it was like to be a young woman in the Mormon Church. In so doing, she focuses on her participation in church groups; the centrality of family to the Mormon church; expectations of dating and double standards for young men and young women in romantic relationships; and her belief that gender hierarchies in the Church would neither inhibit her independence nor prevent her from pursuing both a career and a family. Hassan also addresses the matter of race in the predominantly white Mormon church: she describes her own experience as a young black woman, and she discusses the Mormon ban on black men entering the priesthood prior to 1978. She also explains the precedence of faith over race when choosing a marriage partner. Throughout the interview, Hassan’s comments are revealing of the growing role of the Mormon Church in the American South at the end of the twentieth century.
Time: 1:53:36
Subjects:
Hassan, Adetola, 1984?- — Interviews.
Mormon women — Southern States — Interviews.
Women, Black — Southern States — Interviews.
Nigerians — Southern States — Interviews.
Mormon women — Religious life — North Carolina — Cary.
Women in the Mormon Church — Southern States.
Mormon Church — Customs and practices.

Richard Hicks

Title: Oral history interview with Richard Hicks, February 1, 1991 [electronic resource] : interview M-0023, Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007).
Author: Hicks, Richard. Interviewee
Other Author: Wells, Goldie F. (Goldie Frinks) Interviewer.
Publisher: [Chapel Hill, N.C.] : University Library, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2008.
Location: Documenting the American South (website)
Call Number: http://docsouth.unc.edu/sohp/M-0023/menu.html
Format: internet resource (full text and audio)
Time: 0:45:50
Description: Richard Hicks, the principal of Hillside High School in Durham, North Carolina, at the time of the interview, describes his management style, his approach to hiring and firing, his attention to discipline, and other details of his position. In 1990, Hillside High School had a 100% black student body, and 70% of its teachers were black. Hicks does not believe that the school’s racial composition has contributed to its success, though, and despite the uniqueness of his position, he does not speak a great deal about race or the legacy of desegregation. Researchers interested in these subjects will find some brief excerpts in which Hicks denies the influence of desegregation on his own career (although he concedes that black candidates for principal positions need to have unique qualities to be considered) and comments on the relationship between black students and black teachers. Topics not covered in this interview are resegregation and the effects of white flight.
Subjects:
Hicks, Richard — Interviews.
African American school principals — North Carolina — Durham — Interviews.
High schools — North Carolina — Durham — Administration.
African American schools — North Carolina — Durham.
Education, Secondary — North Carolina — Durham.
African Americans — Education (Secondary) — North Carolina — Durham.

George Watts Hills

Title: Oral history interview with George Watts Hill, January 30, 1986 [electronic resource] : interview C-0047, Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007).
Author: Hill, George Watts, 1901-1993. Interviewee
Other author: Leutze, James R., 1935- Interviewer.
Publisher: [Chapel Hill, N.C.] : University Library, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2008.
Location: Documenting the American South (website)
Call Number: http://docsouth.unc.edu/sohp/C-0047/menu.html
Format: internet resource (full text and audio)
Description: George Watts Hill, born in 1901, spent most of his childhood growing up in Durham, North Carolina. In 1918, Hill attended the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He describes what life was like in that community during the early twentieth century. Hill left UNC in 1924 after finishing both a bachelor’s degree and a law degree. After his marriage and subsequent ten-month honeymoon trip through parts of Asia and Europe in 1925, Hill returned to Durham, determined to continue in the footsteps of his father and his grandfather, both of whom had by that time become pillars of the business community in Durham. Hill describes how his family was responsible for the building of two hospitals in Durham and his father had begun to make a name for himself in banking, having established the Durham Loan and Trust Company (which later became Central Carolina Bank). Because of his perspective from a position of business leadership, Hill is able to offer a unique description of the development of Durham as a center of commerce during the early twentieth century. He describes the roles of various leaders in the area, such as C. C. Spaulding and members of the Duke family, and he discusses the impact of the tobacco and textile industries on the community’s growth. During the late 1920s and throughout the 1930s he pursued various business endeavors, notably in insurance and banking. He helped to found various insurance organizations in Durham, paving the way for the establishment and growth of North Carolina Blue Cross and Blue Shield. Simultaneously, he worked with his father to build their banking enterprises, and when the stock market crashed in 1929, they were in a position to offer loans to smaller banks, thus ensuring their economic survival. During World War II, Hill left North Carolina in order to work for the Office of Strategic Services. When he returned in 1945, he picked up his business endeavors where he had left off. To those efforts he added further forays into land and business development. During the 1950s, he was a prominent figure in the development and rapid growth of the Research Triangle Park. In addition, he tried his hand at dairy farming. Throughout the interview, Hill focuses on descriptions of business leadership and formulas for economic success. He also addresses such issues as balancing work and family, the importance of public service (such as his work with the UNC Board of Trustees), and changing ways of life in Durham and its surrounding areas.
Time: 7:11:55
Subjects:
Hill, George Watts, 1901-1993 — Interviews.
Businessmen — North Carolina — Durham — Interviews.
Philanthropists — North Carolina — Durham — Interviews.
Businessmen — North Carolina — Durham — Attitudes.
University of North Carolina (1793-1962)
College students — North Carolina — Chapel Hill.
Hospital benefactors — North Carolina — Durham.
Durham (N.C.) — Social conditions.
Durham (N.C.) — Commerce.
Banks and banking — North Carolina.
Blue Cross and Blue Shield of North Carolina.
World War, 1939-1945.
Committee to Defend America by Aiding the Allies.
Hill, John Sprunt, b. 1869.
Research Triangle Park (N.C.)
Dairy farms — North Carolina.
Duke family.

Wilbur Hobby — 1973

Title: Hobby, Wilbur, interviewee, December 18, 1973
Publisher: Southern Oral History Program Collection, UNC—Chapel Hill
Call Number: Bass Devries Interviews, 1973-1975, #A0125
Restrictions: No restrictions. Open to research.
Description: Former head of the North Carolina AFL-CIO discusses political work in region since 1949; effect of 1954 school desegregation decision; Frank Graham campaign; decreasing success of labor movement; TV as medium of communication; development of race issue; computerization of AFL-CIO roster; textile industry anti-labor activity; Hobby’s union background and growth as leader; effort to attract blacks to labor movement; strongest and weakest NC locals; Republican influence in labor movement; activity in legislation and campaigns; role in 1972 Democratic primary; labor’s priorities and concerns in legislation; Henry Howell; populist coalitions; Bob Morgan, Jim Hunt; Howard Lee; Bowles-Holshouser race; Governor Holshouser and Republican administration; 2-party politics in NC and the South; labor and black coalition; black-white incident at COPE meeting involving Bill Kirkland; political education goals; Claiborn Ellis as Klansman and union member; Kerr Scott administration; Sanford-Lake campaign.

Wilbur Hobby — 1975

Title: Oral history interview with Wilbur Hobby, March 13, 1975 [electronic resource] : interview E-0006, Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007).
Author: Hobby, Wilbur, 1925-. Interviewee
Other Author: Finger, William R, Interviewer.
Publisher: [Chapel Hill, N.C.] : University Library, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2008.
Location: Documenting the American South (website)
Call Number: http://docsouth.unc.edu/sohp/E-0006/menu.html
Format: internet resource (full text and audio)
Description: Wilbur Hobby was born in Durham, North Carolina, in 1925. In the early 1930s, Hobby’s father, a bricklayer, deserted his mother, leaving her to raise five sons on her own. Hobby describes growing up impoverished in the Edgemont section of Durham, where most of his friends had parents who worked in the tobacco or textile mills. Hobby remained in school through the ninth grade only, dropping out after spending a summer in Ohio working as a batboy for the Durham Bulls. Shortly after leaving school, Hobby’s mother signed a waiver for him to join the Navy at the age of seventeen, and he served in the South Pacific during World War II. He returned to Durham following the war and worked briefly with his father as a bricklayer before becoming employed by the American Tobacco Company. During these years, Hobby married. Although he argues that he had little awareness of the labor movement, with only foggy memories of the 1934 general strike as it occurred in Durham, Hobby explains how he became increasingly involved in labor politics during the late 1940s. Joining the union at the American Tobacco Company in 1946, he soon became actively involved and was eventually elected president of the night shift workers. From there, Hobby became an active participant in the Voters for Better Government in Durham, a coalition of laborers, African Americans, and liberal intellectuals from Duke University. Hobby describes how they became a formidable force in local politics during the late 1940s and 1950s. In addition, Hobby discusses his involvement with other labor organizations, such as Labor’s League for Political Education (LLPE) and the AFL-CIO Committee on Political Education (COPE). In 1958 and 1959, Hobby worked briefly for the textile unions in Florida and Georgia after he was fired from the American Tobacco Company. Because of his work with both tobacco and textile unions and the Voters for Better Government, Hobby had become well known enough in the movement to become elected as director of COPE in 1959—a position he held until 1969.
Time: 1:28:53
Subjects:
Hobby, Wilbur, 1925- — Interviews.
Labor unions — Southern States — Officials and employees — Interviews.
Labor unions — Southern States — Political activity.
Durham (N.C.) — Politics and government.
Political action committees — North Carolina — Durham.
Voters for Better Government (Durham, N.C.)
AFL-CIO. Committee on Political Education.

Betty Hodges

Title: Betty Hodges papers, 1987-1996 [manuscript].
Author: Hodges, Betty.
Location: UNC – Chapel Hill Libraries: Archival Materials (Wilson Library) Southern Historical Collection
Call Number: 4863
Format: Archival Materials; audio cassettes
Description: Journalist Betty Ann Arnold Hodges (1926- ) was born in Waynesboro, Va., where she apprenticed as a linotype operator during World War II when shortages forced employers to hire women for jobs traditionally held by men. She received an A.B. degree in English from the University of North Carolina in 1950. Moving to Durham, N.C., in 1954, Hodges worked at the Durham Morning Herald, where she served in several capacities, including style editor and, for 43 years, book columnist. Hodges married newspaperman Ed Hodges in 1954; they had two children.
Three audio cassettes of interviews Hodges conducted with writers, 1995-1996, and a scrapbook of Hodges’s Durham Morning Herald articles that were entered in the 1987 competition for the Lulu Award for fashion journalism.
Subjects:
Durham (N.C.)–Newspapers.
Hodges, Betty.
Journalists–North Carolina–History–20th century.
Women journalists–North Carolina–History–20th century.
Web address: http://search.trln.org/search?id=UNCb3732514 ; http://www.lib.unc.edu/mss/inv/h/Hodges,Betty.html
Restrictions: access restricted

Scott Hoyman — 1973

Title: Oral history interview with Scott Hoyman, Fall 1973 [electronic resource] : interview E-0009, Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007).
Author: Hoyman, Scott, Interviewee.
Other Author: Ashbaugh, Carolyn, Interviewer.
McCurry, Dan C, Interviewer.
Publisher: [Chapel Hill, N.C.] : University Library, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2007.
Format: full text and audio access
Description: Scott Hoyman was an organizer and bargainer for the Textile Workers Union of America (TWUA) beginning in the 1940s. In the 1950s, he began to organize textile mills in the South for TWUA before becoming the south regional director in the late 1960s. In this interview, he focuses on the TWUA’s role in the Oneita Knitting Mills strike in Andrews and Lane, South Carolina, in 1973. He begins by describing the situation for workers in these two plants, detailing racial dynamics in each plant: the Andrews plant consisted primarily of white women, whereas the Lane plant mainly employed African American women. After explaining how the International Ladies Garment Workers Union (ILGWU) became a less predominant force for these textile workers, Hoyman focuses on how the TWUA worked to help the striking workers. Throughout the interview, Hoyman describes various strategies and tactics for the organization of textile workers in the South. He stresses the conditions and activities leading up to a strike, the role of collective bargaining, and the impact of such factors as money and participation of workers. In addition, he stresses the importance of strong leadership and staff in successfully advocating for workers’ rights. Finally, Hoyman briefly addresses the history of the TWUA, describing interactions and tensions with similar organizations, such as the Textile Workers Organizing Committee (TWOC) and the United Textile Workers (UTW). He concludes the interview by stressing the importance of having a strong unified force for organizing textile workers and by offering an assessment of the TWUA’s work with major textile companies in the South at the time of the interview in the mid-1970s.
Time: 02:27:58.
Subjects:
Hoyman, Scott — Interviews.
Labor unions — Southern States — Officials and employees — Interviews.
Collective bargaining — Textile industry — Southern States.
Strikes and lockouts — Textile industry — South Carolina.
Textile workers — Labor unions — Organizing — Southern States — History.
Textile Workers Union of America.
Labor unions — Southern States.

Scott Hoyman — 1974

Title: Oral history interview with Scott Hoyman, July 16, 1974 [electronic resource] : interview E-0010, Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007).
Author: Hoyman, Scott. Interviewee
Other Author: Finger, William R, Interviewer.
Publisher: [Chapel Hill, N.C.] : University Library, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2008.
Location: Documenting the American South (website)
Call Number: http://docsouth.unc.edu/sohp/E-0010/menu.html
Format: internet resource (full text and audio)
Description: Scott Hoyman began working for the Textile Workers Union of America (TWUA) during the 1940s. He had first become aware of the labor movement while living in Philadelphia and attending the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania. During his first years of service with the TWUA, Hoyman worked in New England; however, he was transferred to the South during the early 1950s. Hoyman attributes this to divisions within the TWUA when two of its leaders, George Baldanzi and Emil Rieve, were at odds. The organization was divided in loyalty to these two factions, and Hoyman recalls that the division was largely regional in nature—more conservative New Englanders sided with Rieve in opposition to the more radical Baldanzi faction, which had a large following in the South. Hoyman speaks at length about the impact of this division on the TWUA, particularly on its membership and efforts to organize locals in the South during the 1950s and 1960s. Shortly after the initial split, Hoyman was sent to Greensboro and then Durham, North Carolina. In Durham, he worked with the Erwin Mills in order to keep them from defecting to the United Textile Workers (UTW). Hoyman discusses the challenges he faced at the Erwin Mills and then shifts his focus to his work with the Cone Mills in Greensboro, North Carolina. Hoyman was based in Greensboro from 1954 to 1960 but was never able to build a very firm basis of support for the TWUA among the Cone workers. Throughout the interview, he discusses the role of leadership within the TWUA and its efforts to organize in the South. In addition, he discusses how the labor movement evolved after he became the southern regional director of the TWUA in 1967. Focusing on his first major effort to organize workers as a regional director in Whiteville, North Carolina, Hoyman emphasizes the difficulties of organizing in the South after the Baldanzi-Rieve split.
Time: 2:06:52
Subjects:
Hoyman, Scott — Interviews.
Labor unions — Southern States — Officials and employees — Interviews.
Textile workers — Labor unions — Organizing — North Carolina.
Textile Workers Union of America.
Industrial relations — North Carolina.

Bill Hull

Title: Oral history interview with Bill Hull, June 21, 2001 [electronic resource] : interview K-0844, Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007).
Author: Hull, Bill, 1945-. Interviewee
Other author: McGinnis, Chris, Interviewer.
Publisher: [Chapel Hill, N.C.] : University Library, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2008.
Location: Documenting the American South (website)
Call Number: http://docsouth.unc.edu/sohp/K-0844/menu.html
Format: internet resource (full text and audio)
Description: Because he and all of his siblings were gay men, Bill Hull felt his sexuality was not unusual. Nonetheless, discretion was vital to southern gay men, say Hull. Public acknowledgement of homosexuality could result in economic recrimination or physical violence. He describes his coming-out experience as a teenager and the impact the liberating Chapel Hill atmosphere had on gay males. His experiences at the University of North Carolina and his participation in the local civil rights movement further awakened his sexual and social consciousness. Hull explains how the civil rights movement served as the basis for the later gay rights movement. He points to dominant gay personalities in Chapel Hill and the pivotal role early gay bars had on his sexual identity. The interview illuminates the public safe sexual havens on the UNC’s campus. He describes the fear of HIV and AIDS within the gay community in the early 1980s. Hull argues that the subsequent conservative backlash against gay culture negatively impacted the openness of the Chapel Hill gay community.
Time: 1:34:17
Subjects:
Hull, Bill, 1945- — Interviews.
Gay men — North Carolina — Chapel Hill — Interviews.
Gay men — North Carolina — Chapel Hill — Social life and customs.
Gay men — Sexual behavior — North Carolina — Chapel Hill.
Gay bars — North Carolina.
Gay men — North Carolina — Identity.
Gay men — Family relationships — North Carolina — Durham.


J

Charles M. Jones

Title: Oral history interview with Charles M. Jones, July 21, 1990 [electronic resource] : interview A-0335, Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007).
Author: Jones, Charles Miles, 1906-1993. Interviewee
Other Author: Egerton, John, Interviewer.
Jones, Dorcas, Interviewee.
Publisher: [Chapel Hill, N.C.] : University Library, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2008.
Location: Documenting the American South (website)
Call Number: http://docsouth.unc.edu/sohp/A-0335/menu.html
Format: internet resource (full text and audio)
Description: Charles Jones led the First Presbyterian Church in Chapel Hill during the late 1940s. In this interview, he briefly describes his education and how he entered the ministry. He spends most of the time discussing the controversies that occurred during his tenure at the church. The regional presbytery disapproved of his decision to allow African American Presbyterians to attend the church and to provide shelter to Freedom Riders after they left Durham, North Carolina. Jones also went against church rules by not having his members read the Article of Faith during service. He describes how the presbytery tried to force him to move to another church, pledge support for the Article of Faith, and segregate the church. Some local whites, including students and faculty at the University of North Carolina, supported Jones throughout this process. Nevertheless, he was eventually expelled from the Presbyterian Church for his views on race and faith. The interview closes with his opinions on the inevitable failure of the “separate but equal” doctrine and whether John Egerton, the interviewer, was correct in seeing the period between 1945 and 1950 as a missed opportunity for improvement in race relations.
Time: 1:02:34
Subjects:
Jones, Charles Miles, 1906-1993 — Interviews.
Jones, Dorcas — Interviews.
Chapel Hill Presbyterian Church (Chapel Hill, N.C.)
Civil rights workers — North Carolina — Chapel Hill — Interviews.
Presbyterians — North Carolina — Chapel Hill.
Race relations — Religious aspects — Christianity.
Civil rights movements — North Carolina — Chapel Hill.
Racism — North Carolina — Chapel Hill.
Graham, Frank Porter, 1886-1972.


K

Nannerl O. Keohane

Title: Oral history interview with Nannerl O Keohane, 2004.
Author: Keohane, Nannerl O., 1940-
Interviewed by: Walter E. Campbell in Durham, N.C. on May 26, 2004
Location: Duke: Medical Center Library
Call Number: Oral History Collection, 7c Keohane, 5/26/2004, Tape 1, Transcript
Format: Contains audiotapes and transcript of an oral history interview recorded on cassette tapes.
Description: Professor of political science and president of Duke University (1993 to 2004).
Contains audiotapes and transcript of an oral history interview recorded on cassette tapes. Major subjects in this interview include Duke University, Duke University Medical Center, Duke University Health System, managed health care, Ralph Snyderman, the Duke University Board of Trustees, Duke University School of Nursing, and translational medicine.
Subjects:
Keohane, Nannerl O.–1940-
Snyderman, Ralph.
Duke University.
Duke University Health System.
Duke University.–Board of Trustees.
Duke University.–Medical Center.
Duke University.–School of Nursing.
History of Medicine–North Carolina–Personal Narratives.

Clarence F. Korstian

Title: Clarence F. Korstian : forty years of forestry : an oral history interview, Durham, North Carolina, 16 February 1959
Author:
Elwood R. Maunder.
Maunder, Elwood R.
Forest History Society.
Korstian, Clarence F. (Clarence Ferdinand), 1889-1968.
Publisher: New Haven, [Conn.] : Forest History Society, Yale University, 1969.
Location: NC State: Satellite Shelving Facility
Call Number: SD129 .K6 M28 1969
Format: Book
Description: Clarence F. Korstian
Subjects:
Foresters–Interviews
Korstian, Clarence F.–(Clarence Ferdinand),–1889-1968
Web address: http://search.trln.org/search?id=NCSU416610

Juanita Kreps

Title: Oral history interview with Juanita Kreps, January 17, 1986 [electronic resource] : interview C-0011, Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007).
Author: Kreps, Juanita Morris. Interviewee
Other Author: Haessly, Lynn, Interviewer.
Publisher: [Chapel Hill, N.C.] : University Library, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2008.
Location: Documenting the American South (website)
Call Number: http://docsouth.unc.edu/sohp/C-0011/menu.html
Format: internet resource (full text and audio)
Description: Juanita Kreps grew up in coal-mining Harlan County, Kentucky, but eventually made her way to Durham, North Carolina, where she earned a Ph.D. in economics, and Washington, D.C., where she served as Secretary of Commerce in the Carter administration. In this interview, Kreps remembers a career, as she puts it, “of proposing things before people are ready to accept them.” Such things included the notion that women should seek out satisfying careers, a proposal to extend the age of eligibility for Social Security, and that day care should be provided for working women. Kreps herself, a female academic during World War II and already a professional success as women began to push for economic equality, was ahead of her time. This interview provides a brief biography of a woman who made a strong case for women’s rights before the women’s movement gained momentum.
Time: 1:19:54
Subjects:
Kreps, Juanita Morris — Interviews.
Women cabinet officers — United States — Interviews.
Women college administrators — North Carolina — Durham — Interviews.
Feminists — United States — Interviews.
United States — Economic policy — 1971-1981.
Women in politics — United States.


L

Jonathan Leiss

Title: Jonathan Leiss papers, 2002-2007
Author: Leiss, Jonathan.
Location: Duke: Special Collections Library
Call Number: Library Service Center Acc. 07/053: Box 1
Format: Manuscript
Description: Collection includes 15 oral history interviews on 19 cassette tapes, interview transcripts, and other papers related to Leiss’s research on Duke University administrator Jon Julian “Jake” Phelps and his experiences during the Civil Rights movement in Durham, N.C. Interview subjects include Jake Phelps, Howard Clement, Floyd McKissick, Jr., Bill Griffith, Stephen Phelps, Peggy Manring (Manning ?), Wayne King, and Trudy Minnear Smith. Use copies must be created before patrons may access the audiocassettes in the collection.
Subjects:
Civil rights movements–North Carolina–Durham–History–20th century
Durham (NC.)–Race relations.
Leiss, Jonathan
Phelps, Jon Julian
US. Southern History and Culture.

Kenneth Winstead Lewis

Title: Interview with Kenneth Winstead Lewis
Author:
Vincent J. Toussaint.
Lewis, Kenneth Winstead, 1961-
Law School Oral History Project (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)
Toussaint, Vincent J.
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. School of Law.
Publisher: [Chapel Hill, N.C.] : University of North Carolina, c1995.
Location: UNC – Chapel Hill Libraries: Law Library
Call Number: KFN7926.A8 L48 1995
Format: Book
Description: 46 leaves ; 28 cm.
Note: Photocopy of the original typewritten transcript of the taped interview of Kenneth Winstead Lewis in Durham, N.C. on November 15, 1994 and November 16, 1994.
“Original transcript on deposit at the Southern Historical Collection, Louis Round Wilson Library.”
Subjects:
Lewis, Kenneth Winstead, 1961-
Lewis, Kenneth Winstead, 1961- — Interviews.
Lawyers — North Carolina — Interviews.

Barbara Lorie

Title: Oral history interview with Barbara Lorie, February 26, 2001 [electronic resource] : interview K-0211, Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007).
Author: Lorie, Barbara. Interviewee
Publisher: [Chapel Hill, N.C.] : University Library, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2008.
Location: Documenting the American South (website)
Call Number: http://docsouth.unc.edu/sohp/K-0211/menu.html
Format: internet resource (full text and audio)
Description: After the assassination of John F. Kennedy, Barbara Lorie became radicalized. She worked at Durham Academy for a year before Chapel Hill High principal May Marshbanks hired her as a literature teacher at the newly built integrated high school. There she employed unconventional teaching methods to eliminate racial barriers within her classroom. The Chapel Hill superintendent of schools as well as white Chapel Hill parents questioned Lorie’s tactics because of the uncomfortable atmosphere they felt it created for blacks and whites. Following the resultant demotion, Lorie quit and worked for Pinecrest High School in Southern Pines. There she encountered similar racial tensions between the students, leading her to conclude that racism is endemic. She argues that racism breeds violence, and she blames television for perpetuating a dominant and violent white male culture. Lorie also contends that not only blacks but whites were psychologically damaged by segregation; she maintains that whites isolate themselves from other cultures and that blacks lose their cultural identities when not integrated into the dominant society. Lorie’s social justice activism continues into her old age: she joined a predominantly black church to maintain an intimate relationship with blacks, and she identifies herself as a left-wing, environmentalist radical feminist.
Time: 1:15:40


M

Brownie McGhee

Title: Brownie McGhee archive collection, 1987 [manuscript].
Author: McGhee, Brownie, 1915-1996.
Location: UNC – Chapel Hill Libraries: Manuscripts Dept Southern Folklife Collection
Call Number: FS351
Format: Archival Materials; sound recordings
Description: Recording of an interview and the music of Brownie McGhee, African-American blues guitarist and singer, originally from Tennessee, who spent many years living and performing in Durham, N.C.
Subjects:
African American musicians–Interviews.
African Americans–North Carolina–Music.
Blues (Music)–North Carolina.
Blues musicians–Interviews.
Durham County (N.C.)–Songs and music.
Guitar music (Blues)
McGhee, Brownie, 1915-1996.
Musicians–North Carolina–Interviews.
North Carolina–Songs and music.
Radio programs–North Carolina.
Web address: http://search.trln.org/search?id=UNCb2454244

Floyd B. McKissick, Sr.

Title: McKissick, Floyd B. Sr., interviewee, December 6, 1973
Publisher: Southern Oral History Program, UNC—Chapel Hill
Call Number: #A0134, Bass Devries Interviews, 1973-1973
Restrictions: No restrictions. Open to research.
Description: Floyd McKissick discusses a lifetime of politics and activism in this interview. McKissick was a devoted civil rights activist before and after World War II, integrating the law school of the University of North Carolina and aiding students in sit-ins in the 1960s. In 1966, he took over leadership of the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE), one of the nation’s most prominent civil rights organizations. Shortly thereafter, he left CORE to contribute to the development of Soul City, a town in rural North Carolina intended to showcase the economic potential of a new kind of community. In this 1973 interview, McKissick reflects on the civil rights movement and its legacies. McKissick held that African American leaders needed to find pragmatic solutions for solidifying the gains won with legal battles and public protests in the 1960s. One such solution, he believed, was to demonstrate the economic and social viability of a town free from racism: Soul City. In addition to considering broad themes of the civil rights movement and Soul City, McKissick moves through the interviewer’s list of questions about race and rights, answering queries about busing, averring his support for the legacy of former Governor Terry Sanford, and offering one civil rights leader’s evaluation of the movement and hopes for the future of economic and racial justice.

Louis B. Meyer

Title: Interview with Judge Louis B. Meyer
Author:
Reed Fountain.
Meyer, Louis B.
Fountain, Reed.
Law School Oral History Project (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. School of Law.
Publisher: [Chapel Hill, N.C.] : University of North Carolina, c1995.
Location: UNC – Chapel Hill Libraries: Law Library
Call Number: KFN7925 .M49 1995
Format: Book
Description: 11 leaves ; 28 cm.
Note: Photocopy of the original typewritten transcript of the taped interview of Judge Louis B. Meyer in Durham, N.C. on October 23, 1995 and January 5, 1996.
“Original transcript on deposit at the Southern Historical Collection, Louis Round Wilson Library.”
Subjects:
Meyer, Louis B., 1933-
Meyer, Louis B., 1933- — Interviews.
Judges — North Carolina — Interviews.
Lawyers — North Carolina — Interviews.

H.M. Micheax

Title: Oral history interview with H.M. Michaux, November 20, 1974 [electronic resource] : interview A-0135, Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007).
Author: Michaux, H. M. (Henry McKinley), 1930-. Interviewee
Other Author: Bass, Jack, Interviewer.
Publisher: [Chapel Hill, N.C.] : University Library, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2008.
Location: Documenting the American South (website)
Call Number: http://docsouth.unc.edu/sohp/A-0135/menu.html
Format: internet resource (full text and audio)
Description: H. M. Michaux discusses his role in black electoral politics in the urban South. His grassroots engagement with local Durham, North Carolina, politics helped to catapult him into the state House of Representatives, where he has served since 1972. Michaux explains that black politicians need to employ different campaign strategies in black and white communities. He also offers insight into the inner workings of black political alliances, as well as the internal decisions involved with political offices. He speculates on the permanence of the Republican Party in North Carolina. Despite some Republican success, Michaux contends that the Democratic Party will continue to dominate North Carolina politics. He stresses the need for a Democratic coalition and black political education in order to preserve black electoral power.
Time: 1:15:27
Subjects:
Michaux, H. M. (Henry McKinley), 1930- — Interviews.
African American legislators — North Carolina — Interviews.
African Americans — North Carolina — Political activity.
North Carolina — Politics and government — 1951-
Democratic Party (N.C.)
Durham Committee on Negro Affairs.
Durham Committee on the Affairs of Black People.
North Carolina — Race relations — Political aspects.

Dora Scott Miller

Title: Oral history interview with Dora Scott Miller, June 6, 1979 [electronic resource] : interview H-0211, Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007).
Author: Miller, Dora Scott, 1906-1992. Interviewee
Other Author: Jones, Beverly Washington, 1948- Interviewer.
Publisher: [Chapel Hill, N.C.] : University Library, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2008.
Location: Documenting the American South (website)
Call Number: http://docsouth.unc.edu/sohp/H-0211/menu.html
Format: internet resource (full text and audio)
Description: Dora Scott Miller grew up in Apex, North Carolina, and finished high school before marrying and taking a job at the Liggett and Myers Tobacco Company in Durham, where she spent nearly four decades. During her tenure there, Miller watched the company evolve into a racially integrated, unionized company. However, much of this interview focuses on her experiences there before World War II, when a non-union workforce primarily consisting of black women worked long hours for little pay under white foremen. Miller and her coworkers kept their mouths shut to keep their jobs, but maintained enough strength to vote in a union when it arrived and to form a supportive community outside of the workplace. This interview should prove a rich source of information for researchers interested in southern industrial work from the perspective of an African American woman.
Time: 1:17:18
Subjects:
Miller, Dora Scott, 1906-1992 — Interviews.
Women tobacco workers — North Carolina — Durham — Interviews.
African American women employees — North Carolina — Durham — Interviews.
Apex (N.C.) — Race relations.
Farm life — North Carolina — Apex.
Liggett & Myers Tobacco Company.
Women tobacco workers — North Carolina — Durham — Social conditions.
Tobacco industry — North Carolina — Durham.
Tobacco workers — Health and hygiene — North Carolina — Durham.
Tobacco workers — North Carolina — Durham — Race relations.
Tobacco workers — Labor unions — North Carolina — Durham.
Labor unions, Black — North Carolina — Durham.
Shop stewards — North Carolina — Durham.

John Thomas Moore

Title: Oral history interview with John Thomas Moore, October 18, 2000 [electronic resource] : interview R-0142, Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007).
Author: Moore, John Thomas, d. 2001. Interviewee
Other Author: Weber, Chris, Interviewer
Publisher: [Chapel Hill, N.C.] : University Library, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2008.
Location: Documenting the American South (website)
Call Number: http://docsouth.unc.edu/sohp/R-0142/menu.html
Format: internet resource (full text and audio)
Description: Bishop John Thomas Moore Jr. says that Jesus began speaking to him when he was still in high school. His peers did not understand him, but his faith gave him the strength to endure their puzzlement, and he entered the ministry in 1957, just after he graduated. He had an active career, much of it in Durham, North Carolina, where he eventually founded the New Gospel Horizon Resurrection Holy Church, Inc. Moore’s father died in a hospital when Moore was young, the victim of a brutal beating and an unsuccessful amputation. His father’s death may have inspired Moore to use his faith to heal his congregants, laying hands upon them, and to bring his religious devotion to elder care facilities, a practice he stopped shortly before this interview because of his own health problems. Moore is fiercely devoted to God and believes that God and the devil are at work in his daily life. This conviction drives this interview, as Moore recalls his career in the ministry and his struggle with diabetes, an ordeal that, according to Moore, pitted God and the devil against one another on the battlefield of Moore’s body. This belief gives Moore a split worldview, one that sees the glorious potential of God’s love, but also the insidious influence of the devil and a steady decline toward the apocalypse described in the book of Revelation. His struggles—including a troubled marriage and his efforts to uplift the black community—and his successes all inspire him to further devotion. This interview provides a detailed portrait of the role of religion in one man’s life and his efforts to use his devotion to shape the world around him.
Time: 1:29:33
Subjects:
Moore, John Thomas, d. 2001 — Interviews.
African American clergy — North Carolina — Durham — Interviews.
African American Pentecostals — North Carolina — Durham — Interviews.
African Americans — Religious life — North Carolina — Durham.

Pauli Murray

Title: Oral history interview with Pauli Murray, February 13, 1976 [electronic resource] : interview G-0044, Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007).
Author: Murray, Pauli, 1910-1985. Interviewee
Other Author: McNeil, Genna Rae, Interviewer.
Publisher: [Chapel Hill, N.C.] : University Library, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2008.
Location: Documenting the American South (website)
Call Number: http://docsouth.unc.edu/sohp/G-0044/menu.html
Format: internet resource (full text and audio)
Description: Pauli Murray was born in Baltimore, Maryland, in 1910. A few years thereafter, her mother died, and she went to live with her Aunt Pauline in Durham, North Carolina. Murray begins the interview with a discussion of her early memories of her family before shifting the focus to her childhood and adolescent years in Durham. Murray offers a vivid comparison of race relations in that area over the span of three generations, noting important class distinctions, hierarchies related to skin tone, and the evolution of racial violence. Murray recalls her early school years with fondness and argues that she was imbued with a strong sense of racial identity both at home and in school. Shortly following her graduation from high school, Murray turned down a full scholarship to Wilberforce University in Ohio because she had already determined that she no longer wanted to have a segregated education. During the late 1920s, Murray established residency in New York so she could attend Hunter College, a women’s school where she was one of a handful of African American students. Murray describes some of her experiences at Hunter College (she graduated in 1933) and her decision to stay in New York for a few years while working on her poetry.
During the late 1930s, Murray returned to North Carolina, partly at the behest of her Aunt Pauline, with the intention of pursuing graduate work at the University of North Carolina. In 1938, Murray was declined admittance to UNC because of her race. Her unsuccessful effort to challenge the decision was the first of three pivotal experiences in her journey towards pursuing a career in law. The second occurred shortly thereafter, in 1940, when Murray and a friend were arrested for violating segregation statutes and for creating a public disturbance when riding a Greyhound bus through Petersburg, Virginia. On the coattails of her arrest and short prison term, Murray began to work for the Workers Defense League, specifically with the legal defense effort for Odell Waller, an African American sharecropper sentenced to death for the murder of his white landlord. Her work on this case was the third pivotal incident, and it led her to meet Leon Ransom, who arranged for her to attend Howard University on a full scholarship. During her years in law school at Howard University, Murray continued to pursue her interests in matters of racial justice; however, it was also during those years that she became acutely aware of gender discrimination. After her graduation, Murray pursued further education at the University of California, Berkeley, and worked briefly as the Deputy Attorney General of California before accepting a position with a law firm in New York. During the early 1960s, Murray traveled to Ghana where she helped set up a law school. In addition to describing her work there, she also offers a unique perspective on African politics during the early 1960s. After her return to the United States, Murray worked as a law professor at Brandeis University and continued her political involvement on the Civil and Political Rights committee of the President’s Commission on the Status of Women and with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. In 1973, she left her position at Brandeis in order to enter the seminary, in part because she believed that the civil rights and women’s liberation movements had become too militant and that an emphasis on reconciliation would better result in equality. The remainder of the interview is devoted to a discussion of Murray’s poetry, her book Proud Shoes, and her views on racial and class differences within the women’s movement.
Time: 5:18:41
Subjects:
Murray, Pauli, 1910-1985 — Interviews.
African American women civil rights workers — United States — Interviews.
African American women lawyers — United States — Interviews.
African American women poets — United States — Interviews.
African American feminists — United States — Interviews.
African Americans — Civil rights — United States.
African Americans — Segregation — United States.
Civil rights movements — United States.
Women’s rights.
Durham (N.C.) — Race relations.
African American women law teachers — Ghana — Accra.
African American women clergy — United States.


N

Blaine Nashold

Title: Oral history interview with Blaine Nashold, 2004
Author: Nashold, Blaine S., 1923-
Location: Duke: Medical Center Library
Call Number: Oral History Collection, 7c Nashold, 2/13/2004, Tape 1, Tape 2, Transcript
Format: Contains audiotapes and transcript of an oral history interview recorded on cassette tapes. Description: Blaine S. Nashold is professor emeritus of the Department of Surgery, Division of Neurosurgery at Duke University Medical Center. Contains audiotapes and a transcript of an oral history interview. Major subjects in the interview include neurosurgery; stereotaxic techniques, history, and instrumentation; Guy L. Odom, Eugene A. Stead, and Barnes Woodhall. The interview was conducted on Feb. 13, 2004 by Jessica Roseberry.
Subjects:
Nashold, Blaine S.–1923-
Odom, Guy L.
Stead, Eugene A.
Woodhall, Barmes–1905-
Duke University.–Dept. of Surgery.–Division of Neurosurgery.
Physicians–Interview.
History of Medicine–North Carolina–Personal Narratives.
Neurosurgery.
Stereotaxic Techniques.
Stereotaxic Techniques–history.
Stereotaxic Techniques–instrumentation.

Patricia Neal

Title: Oral history interview with Patricia Neal, June 6, 1989 [electronic resource] : interview C-0068, Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007).
Author: Neal, Patricia, 1935-. Interviewee
Other Author: Nasstrom, Kathryn L, Interviewer.
Publisher: [Chapel Hill, N.C.] : University Library, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2008.
Location: Documenting the American South (website)
Call Number: http://docsouth.unc.edu/sohp/C-0068/menu.html
Format: internet resource (full text and audio)
Description: Patricia Neal moved to Durham, North Carolina, from Connecticut in 1953 to study nursing at Duke University. Shortly thereafter, she married, started a family, and left school to help support her husband while he finished his medical training. Neal and her family settled in Durham, and during the late 1950s and early 1960s she became involved in the Parent-Teacher Association and the League of Women’s Voters, and began working as a substitute teacher. In 1964, Neal spent a year monitoring the Durham County Board of Education for the League. Her dissatisfaction with their decisions led her to run for a position on the board as a Republican in 1968. Neal lost the election by a small margin, but was appointed several months later when one of the five seats was vacated. After serving nearly eighteen years on the board, and as the chair for five, Neal was appointed to the North Carolina Board of Directors of the North Carolina Board of Education Association. In this interview, she describes the role of the Durham County Board of Education in the process of integration in Durham schools during the 1960s and 1970s. In so doing, Neal pays particular attention to African American leadership, demographics, and community responses to integration. After briefly discussing the presence of African American students at one Durham school, Hope Valley School, Neal shifts the focus to the impact of Alexander v. Holmes (1969) on Durham schools. As Neal describes it, the board had no resistance to integration but wanted to postpone until the end of the school year so that the students would not be disrupted. Their request was denied, and just before schools broke for the Christmas holiday, the Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals ordered that they integrate by the first of the year. Neal describes the role of the board in this process and argues that integration occurred smoothly and with only one incident of racial tension at Northern High School, which she and the board helped to mediate. In addition, Neal discusses the decline of Durham city schools as a result of integration; her thoughts on problems facing education following integration, including the issue of busing; and the role of gender in her own career.
Time:1:26:42
Subjects:
Neal, Patricia, 1935- — Interviews.
School board members — North Carolina — Durham County — Interviews.
Women local officials and employees — North Carolina — Durham County — Interviews.
School integration — North Carolina — Durham.
Education, Secondary — North Carolina — Durham.
Education, Elementary — North Carolina — Durham.
Durham (N.C.) — Race relations.

Joyce Nichols

Title: Oral history interview with Joyce Nichols, 2006
Author: Nichols, Joyce.
Interviewed by Jessica Roseberry on October 31, 2006.
Location: Duke: Medical Center Library.
Finding aid in repository and on the Web.
Call Number: Oral History Collection Transcript and CD
Format: Includes a CD and transcript of an oral history interview with Joyce Nichols.
Description: First female to graduate from Duke University’s Physician Assistant Program, and the first African-American female to graduate from any physician assistant program.
Includes a CD and transcript of an oral history interview with Joyce Nichols. Major subjects in this interview include Nichols’ experiences as an African-American at Duke while studying to be a physician assistant and a licensed practical nurse, her experiences at Lincoln Community Health Center, and her struggles with the Housing Authority of Durham.
Subjects:
Nichols, Joyce.
Duke University.
Duke University.–Medical Center.
African Americans–Housing–North Carolina.
African Americans in medicine.
Durham (N.C.)
Durham Housing Authority.
Lincoln Community Health Center (Durham, N.C.)
Nursing, Practical.
Physician Assistants–education–North Carolina.
Women in medicine.
History of Medicine–North Carolina–Personal Narratives.


O

Katushka Olave

Title: Oral history interview with Katushka Olave, December 9, 1998 [electronic resource] : interview K-0659, Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007).
Author: Olave, Katushka. Interviewee
Other Author: Rouverol, Alicia J., 1961- Interviewer.
Publisher: [Chapel Hill, N.C.] : University Library, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2008.
Location: Documenting the American South (website)
Call Number: http://docsouth.unc.edu/sohp/K-0659/menu.html
Format: internet resource (full text and audio)
Description: Inspired by the leftist political traditions of her native Bolivia and by her mother’s political activism, Katushka Olave brought her devotion to social and racial justice to Durham, North Carolina. There she worked to promote these values through volunteering and work in community organizations. In this interview, she shares her opinions on social activism, aid organizations, and Latino cultural identity. Olave offers insight into race, identity, and activism, including her effort to bridge the gap between the African-American and Latino communities in Durham.
Time: 1:01:36
Subjects:
Olave, Katushka — Interviews.
Hispanic American women — North Carolina — Durham — Interviews.
Social reformers — North Carolina — Durham — Interviews.
Hispanic Americans — North Carolina — Durham — Political activity.
African Americans — North Carolina — Durham — Relations with Hispanic Americans.
Community-based social services — North Carolina — Durham.

B.B. Olive

Title: Interview with attorney B. B. Olive
Author:
Jennifer Marsico.
Olive, Billy Brown.
Law School Oral History Project (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)
Marsico, Jennifer.
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. School of Law.
Publisher: [Chapel Hill, N.C.] : University of North Carolina, c1994.
Location: UNC – Chapel Hill Libraries: Law Library
Call Number: KFN7926.A8 O55 1994
Format: Photocopy of Transcript of interview
Description: 71 leaves ; 28 cm.
Note: Photocopy of the original typewritten transcript of the taped interview of attorney B. B. Olive at his home in Durham, North Carolina on January 27, 1994 and February 15, 1994.
Subjects:
Olive, Billy Brown — Interviews.
Olive, Billy Brown.
Lawyers — North Carolina — Interviews.


P

Emory F. “Pap” Parker

Title: Interview with Emory F. “Pap” Parker [microfilm]
Author:
interviewers Christopher E. Allen [and] A. Dale Coats ; transcriber, Christopher E. Allen.
Parker, Emory F.
Allen, Christopher E.
Coats, A. Dale.
North Carolina. Historic Sites Section. Research Unit.
Reproduction Microfilm of a typescript. Raleigh, N.C. : Division of Archives and History, Archives and Records Section, 1990. 1 reel : negative ; 16 mm.
Location: UNC – Chapel Hill Libraries: North Carolina Collection
Call Number: C970 H673n2 reel 1
Format: microfilm
Description: 23 leaves ; 28 cm.
Series Research reports file
Subjects:
Parker, Emory F.
Tobacco workers–North Carolina–Durham.
Web address: http://search.trln.org/search?id=UNCb2389398

Conrad Odell Pearson

Title: Oral history interview with Conrad Odell Pearson, April 18, 1979 [electronic resource] : interview H-0218, Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007).
Author: Pearson, Conrad Odell, b. 1902. Interviewee
Other Author: Weare, Walter B, Interviewer.
Publisher: [Chapel Hill, N.C.] : University Library, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2008.
Location: Documenting the American South (website)
Call Number: http://docsouth.unc.edu/sohp/H-0218/menu.html
Format: internet resource (full text and audio)
Description: Conrad Odell Pearson grew up in Durham, North Carolina. In 1932, immediately following his graduation from Howard School of Law, Pearson became involved in legally challenging segregation in higher education. The first part of the interview is dedicated to a detailed discussion of his work with fellow attorney Cecil McCoy on a case that challenged the decision of the University of North Carolina to deny admission to Thomas Hocutt, an African American, to the school of pharmacy. After the case failed in the state legal system, Pearson helped to reintroduce it at the federal level as a challenge to the Fourteenth Amendment, where it was ultimately thrown out on a technicality. Pearson continued to litigate against institutional segregation from the 1930s on, and in 1935 he helped to found the Durham Committee on Negro Affairs. In addition to describing his legal and political work for civil rights, Pearson offers an insider’s perspective on race relations in Durham, primarily from the 1920s through the 1940s. Pearson devotes considerable attention to describing the ways in which James Shepard, president of the North Carolina College for Negroes (later North Carolina Central University), and C. C. Spaulding, president of North Carolina Mutual, were leading members within the African American community. In so doing, Pearson offers numerous examples of Shepard’s and Spaulding’s leadership qualities and their ability to work closely with white politicians for the benefit of African Americans. Throughout the interview, Pearson expresses admiration for the leadership capabilities of these men while simultaneously drawing distinctions between their moderate politics and his more radical politics regarding race relations. In addition, Pearson emphasizes that he saw Durham as more progressive in terms of race relations than many other southern communities, citing a general lack of racial discord as evidence. Whereas Pearson devotes considerable attention to describing the role of African American leaders in shaping race relations in Durham, he also offers commentary on the ways in which industrial leaders, like the Duke family and Julian Shakespeare Carr, also shaped the social and racial landscape of Durham. Finally, Pearson discusses the organization of tobacco workers as it affected African Americans in Durham. This interview offers a lively and complicated portrait of race relations in Durham, North Carolina, and the struggle for socioeconomic equality in that city.
Time: 3:18:40
Subjects:
Pearson, Conrad Odell, b. 1902 — Interviews.
African American civil rights workers — North Carolina — Durham — Interviews.
African American lawyers — North Carolina — Durham — Interviews.
Durham (N.C.) — Race relations.
Spaulding, C. C. (Charles Clinton), 1874-1952.
Shepard, James E.
African American civic leaders — North Carolina — Durham.
Durham Committee on Negro Affairs.
Civil rights movements — North Carolina.
African Americans — Civil rights — North Carolina.
Segregation in higher education — North Carolina.

Catherine Louise Peck

Title: Catherine Louise Peck collection, 1982 [manuscript].
Author:
Peck, Catherine Louise.
Caesar, Shirley, 1938-
Location: UNC – Chapel Hill Libraries: Archival Materials (Wilson Library) Southern Folklife Collection
Call Number: FS1266
Format: sound recording
Description: Interview with Shirley Caesar (1938- ), African American gospel singer and evangelist from Durham, N.C., about her experience and beliefs as a female evangelist and her views on women involved in ministries.
Subjects:
African American evangelists–North Carolina–Interviews.
African American singers–North Carolina–Interviews.
African American women–North Carolina–Interviews.
African American women–Religion.
African Americans–North Carolina–Religion.
Caesar, Shirley, 1938-
North Carolina–Religion–20th century.
Oral history.
Women and religion–North Carolina.
Women evangelists–North Carolina–Interviews.
Women singers–North Carolina–Interviews.
Web address: http://search.trln.org/search?id=UNCb2452628

Benjamin E. Powell

Title: Informal recollections [videocassette] : an interview with Dr Benjamin E. Powell, Duke University librarian, 1946-1975
Author:
Connie R. Dunlap, Duke University Librarian, 1975- [1981]
Dunlap, Connie R.
Powell, Benjamin Edward, 1905-
Publisher: [Durham? N.C. : Duke University?, 1977?]
Location: Duke University Archives:
Call Number: 027.7756563 I43, 1977 c.1
Format: Archival Materials; videocassette
Description: Dr. Powell’s recollections of the growth of Duke University Library during his tenure. Begins with a brief introduction to Dr. Powell’s professional career. The interview ends with the introduction of Mrs. Powell and their daughter, Lisa.
Subjects:
Duke University–Library
Librarians–North Carolina–Biography
Powell, Benjamin Edward–1905-
Web address: http://search.trln.org/search?id=DUKE000543110

Ella Fountain Pratt

Title: “I am Ella Fountain Keesler Pratt”: an oral history
Author: Pratt, Ella Fountain, 1914-
Publisher: Durham, NC: Durham Arts Council, Mary Duke Biddle Foundation, c1999.
Location: Duke: Special Collections Library
Call Number: E Pam #7467 c.1
Location 2: Duke University Archives
Call Number 2: S714E
Format: Book
Description:
interviews and editing by Alicia J. Rouverol ; foreword by Reynolds Price ; afterword by Jaki Shelton Green.
Pratt, Ella Fountain, 1914-
Durham Arts Council.
Green, Jaki Shelton, 1953-
Mary Duke Biddle Foundation.
Price, Reynolds, 1933-
Rouverol, Alicia J., 1961-
Subjects:
Durham (NC.)–Intellectual life.
Pratt, Ella Fountain–1914-
Web address: http://search.trln.org/search?id=DUKE003074346Durham County Library also owns this item.


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Lawrence Ridgle — June 3, 1999

Title: Oral history interview with Lawrence Ridgle, June 3, 1999 [electronic resource] : interview K-0143, Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007).
Author: Ridgle, Lawrence, 1931-. Interviewee
Other author: Rouverol, Alicia J., 1961- Interviewer.
Publisher: [Chapel Hill, N.C.] : University Library, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2008.
Location: Documenting the American South (website)
Call Number: http://docsouth.unc.edu/sohp/K-0143/menu.html
Format: internet resource (full text and audio)
Description: This is the first of two interviews with Lawrence Ridgle, who was born during the height of the Great Depression and spent his childhood on Fayetteville Street in Durham, North Carolina. Ridgle begins the interview by recalling that his neighborhood was impoverished but close-knit. Ridgle describes the various ways in which people made ends meet through innovation during the Depression and helping one another out, arguing that “getting by” constituted great success. Ridgle also asserts his admiration for the social welfare programs that Franklin Delano Roosevelt implemented during those years because they put people to work and helped to feed people. Nevertheless, Ridgle also notes that he felt deep disdain for the modern welfare system. In addition to emphasizing community togetherness, he also discusses his father’s job with the American Tobacco Company, which he later elaborates upon in his second interview. Ridgle devotes the second half of the interview to what he sees as decline within the African American community, particularly as a result of urban renewal projects that began during the 1960s. Ridgle argues that these projects created a disconnect between African Americans of different social classes, and that thriving African American business in Durham had all but disappeared during the period of urban renewal. He articulates his admiration for business owners who held out as long as possible. Ridgle concludes the interview by arguing that although many people initially understood urban renewal in a positive light, it ultimately served to isolate African American neighborhoods and communities.
Time: 1:03:50
Subjects:
Ridgle, Lawrence, 1931- — Interviews.
African American men — North Carolina — Durham — Interviews.
African Americans — North Carolina — Durham — Economic conditions.
African Americans — North Carolina — Durham — Social conditions.
Urban renewal — North Carolina — Durham.
African American neighborhoods — North Carolina — Durham.
New Deal, 1933-1939 — North Carolina — Durham.

Lawrence Ridgle — June 9, 1999

Title: Oral history interview with Lawrence Ridgle, June 9, 1999 [electronic resource] : interview K-0144, Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007).
Author: Ridgle, Lawrence, 1931-. Interviewee
Other Author: Rouverol, Alicia J., 1961- Interviewer.
Publisher: [Chapel Hill, N.C.] : University Library, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2008.
Location: Documenting the American South (website)
Call Number: http://docsouth.unc.edu/sohp/K-0144/menu.html
Format: internet resource (full text and audio)
Description: This is the second of two interviews with Lawrence Ridgle, who spent most of his life living in Durham, North Carolina. Ridgle begins this interview by offering a detailed description of his father’s work with the American Tobacco Company, explaining that his father had a fairly good job with the company, considering the opportunities open to African Americans at the time. Following in their father’s footsteps, Ridgle’s sister also worked for the American Tobacco Company, she for more than forty years. Initially employed as a cleaning woman, Ridgle’s sister eventually rose in the ranks of the company to become the first African American foreman. In chronicling her unique achievements, Ridgle argues that her success was a source of tension for some African American workers, who dubbed her “the slave driver.” Ridgle shifts to a discussion of his years spent in the army, arguing that much like his sister, he covered new ground in the area of African American leadership. After first serving as a noncommissioned officer over an all-black battalion in the army, Ridgle presided over one of the first integrated battalions during the early 1950s. He offers numerous anecdotes about his experiences in the army, including the racial tensions he witnessed. Ridgle devotes the last third of the interview to a discussion of his thoughts on the state of affairs for the African American community at the time of this 1999 interview, focusing primarily on the impact of demographic changes resulting from a rapidly growing Latino population. In outlining some of the emerging tensions between African Americans and Latinos, Ridgle argues that Latinos offered a good example of industrious behavior for African Americans and expresses his hope that the two groups could learn from one another. Asserting his belief that urban renewal in Durham was detrimental to African Americans, Ridgle also spends considerable time explaining his disdain for the current welfare system and his perception of drug abuse in Durham, arguing that both contributed to the decline of the African American community. The interview concludes with Ridgle’s ideas for promoting alliances between African Americans, Latinos, and poor whites to work together for the benefit of all three marginalized groups.
Time: 2:13:25
Subjects:
Ridgle, Lawrence, 1931- — Interviews.
African American men — North Carolina — Durham — Interviews.
African Americans — North Carolina — Durham — Social conditions.
Durham (N.C.) — Race relations.
Durham (N.C.) — Population.
African Americans — North Carolina — Durham — Relations with Hispanic Americans.
African American soldiers.
Tobacco workers — Employment — North Carolina — Durham.
Women tobacco workers — Employment — North Carolina — Durham.


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Evelyn Schmidt

Title: Oral history interview with Evelyn Schmidt, February 9, 1999 [electronic resource] : interview K-0137, Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007).
Author: Schmidt, Evelyn, 1926?-. Interviewee
Other Author: Kaplan, Ann, Interviewer.
Publisher: [Chapel Hill, N.C.] : University Library, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2008.
Location: Documenting the American South (website)
Call Number: http://docsouth.unc.edu/sohp/K-0137/menu.html
Format: internet resource (full text and audio)
Description: Dr. Evelyn Schmidt left the South after earning her undergraduate and medical degrees at Duke University, convinced that her liberal political views alienated her from a racially and economically polarized region. When she returned in the early 1970s to head the Durham Community Medical Center, she found a city transformed by desegregation, but with a new set of challenges posed by enduring poverty and an influx of new immigration. In this interview, Schmidt shares her beliefs about the importance of providing access to health care, the need for preventive medicine, her fears about a rising uninsured population, and the challenges of bilingualism. As she discusses these issues she describes not only her philosophy but also the needs of a changing community and the connections between race, class, nationality, and health.
Time: 0:59:34
Subjects:
Schmidt, Evelyn, 1926?- — Interviews.
Women pediatricians — Interviews.
Women physicians — Interviews.
Women pediatricians — North Carolina — Durham — Interviews.
Women physicians — North Carolina — Durham — Interviews.
Lincoln Community Health Center (Durham, N.C.)
Medical centers — North Carolina — Durham.
Durham (N.C.) — Social conditions.
Poor — Medical care — North Carolina — Durham.
Poor — Services for — North Carolina — Durham.
African Americans — Medical care — North Carolina — Durham.
Latin Americans — Medical care — North Carolina — Durham.
Equality — Health aspects — North Carolina — Durham.

Blanche Scott

Title: Oral history interview with Blanche Scott, July 11, 1979 [electronic resource] : interview H-0229, Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007).
Author: Scott, Blanche, 1906-. Interviewee
Other Author: Jones, Beverly Washington, 1948- Interviewer.
Publisher: [Chapel Hill, N.C.] : University Library, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2008.
Location: Documenting the American South (website)
Call Number: http://docsouth.unc.edu/sohp/H-0229/menu.html
Format: internet resource (full text and audio)
Description: Blanche Scott began working at the Liggett and Myers tobacco factory in Durham, North Carolina, at the age of twelve. She spent more than two decades there until she left to pursue a career as a beautician. In this interview, she recalls her two careers and her motivation to rise from poverty and her religious devotion. Researchers interested in the industrializing South will find her recollections of life as a child laborer in a tobacco factory particularly useful. She describes how relatively lax child labor laws enabled her to land a job, the dynamics of the factory floor and the influence of unions thereupon, and some of the details of tobacco work, including her handling of the noxious tobacco. This interview offers an interesting look at the tobacco industry, which dominated North Carolina for decades
Time: 0:57:14
Subjects:
Scott, Blanche, 1906- — Interviews.
Women tobacco workers — North Carolina — Durham — Interviews.
African American beauty operators — North Carolina — Durham — Interviews.
African American women — North Carolina — Durham — Interviews.
Tobacco industry — North Carolina — Durham.
Tobacco workers — Health and hygiene — North Carolina — Durham.
Tobacco workers — North Carolina — Durham — Social life and customs.
Child labor — North Carolina — Durham.
Beauty operators — Education — North Carolina — Durham.
Liggett & Myers Tobacco Company.

Ernest Seeman

Title: Oral history interview with Ernest Seeman, February 13, 1976 [electronic resource] : interview B-0012, Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007).
Author: Seeman, Ernest, 1886-1979. Interviewee
Other Author: Conway, Mimi, Interviewer.
Publisher: [Chapel Hill, N.C.] : University Library, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2008.
Location: Documenting the American South (website)
Call Number: http://docsouth.unc.edu/sohp/B-0012/menu.html
Format: internet resource (full text and audio)
Description: Born in 1887, Ernest Seeman grew up in Durham, North Carolina, as the American Tobacco Company grew to dominate the tobacco industry. Seeman begins with an overview of his family history. Although his father had migrated to North Carolina from Canada shortly before settling in Durham, his mother’s ancestors had lived and farmed in the area since the late seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries. Seeman describes briefly what it was like to grow up in Durham during the late nineteenth century. Around the turn of the twentieth century, Seeman left school to go to work for his father. In 1885, Seeman’s father established Seeman Printery, and the younger Seeman spent his adolescence learning the family trade with his brothers. During the early twentieth century, the Seeman Printery worked closely with the Duke family, particularly one of Buck Duke’s associates, C. W. Toms. Through several anecdotes about his father’s business transactions, Seeman offers some interesting insights into the rise of the American Tobacco Company and its relationship to the community. Seeman describes the transition of the printery as it evolved from a small establishment to a larger, mechanized business. Eventually, the Seemans employed more than fifty printers. Ernest Seeman assumed control of Seeman Printery in 1917 and ran it until 1923. Two years later he was hired as the head of Duke Press, where he worked until 1934. During his time at Duke Press, Seeman helped to found the Explorer’s Club and worked closely with students. By the end of his tenure at Duke Press, Seeman had cultivated a reputation as a radical on campus and was forced to resign following his support of Duke students who lampooned the University dean and president and participated in an uprising in support of labor activism. Shortly thereafter, Seeman moved to New York before settling in Tumbling Creek, Tennessee. Seeman devoted much of the rest of his days to writing, and published his novel American Gold (referred to as Tobacco Town in this interview) just before his death in 1979.
Time: 2:44:21
Subjects:
Seeman, Ernest, 1886-1979 — Interviews.
Printers — North Carolina — Durham — Interviews.
Printing industry — North Carolina — Durham.
Tobacco industry — North Carolina — Durham.
Durham (N.C.) — Economic conditions.
Seeman Printery.
Strikes and lockouts — Textile industry — North Carolina — Durham.
Duke University.
Student strikes — North Carolina — Durham.
African Americans — North Carolina — Durham.
Durham (N.C.) — Race relations.
Duke family.

Mary Duke Biddle Trent Semans — 2006

Title: Oral history interview with Mary Duke Biddle Trent Semans, 2006
Author: Semans, Mary Duke Biddle Trent.
Interviewed by Jessica Roseberry
Location: Duke: Medical Center Library
Web address : http://archives.mc.duke.edu/mcaoralsemansm2_html
Call Number: Oral History Collection Transcript and CD
Format: Includes a CD and transcript of an oral history interview with Mary Duke Biddle Trent Semans.
Description: Member of the Duke family and a female philanthropic leader in health care at Duke and in the Durham community. Includes a CD and transcript of an oral history interview with Mary Duke Biddle Trent Semans. Major subjects in this interview include Semans’ experiences with health care at Duke and in Durham throughout her lifetime.
Subjects:
Semans, Mary Duke Biddle Trent.
Duke University.
Duke University.–Medical Center.
Women in medicine.
History of Medicine–North Carolina–Personal Narratives.

Mary Duke Biddle Trent Semans — 2007

Title: Oral history interview with Mary Duke Biddle Trent Semans, 2007
Author: Semans, Mary Duke Biddle Trent.
Interviewed by Jessica Roseberry
Location: Duke: Medical Center Library
Web address : http://archives.mc.duke.edu/mcaoralsemansm2_html
Call Number: Oral History Collection Transcript and CD
Format: Includes a CD and transcript of an oral history interview with Mary Duke Biddle Trent Semans.
Description: Mary Duke Biddle Trent Semans is a member of the Duke family and a female philanthropic leader in health care at Duke and in the Durham community. Contains CD and transcript of an oral history interview with Mary Duke Biddle Trent Semans. Major subjects in this interview include Semans’s experiences with health care at Duke and in Durham throughout her lifetime.
Subjects:
Semans, Mary Duke Biddle Trent.
Duke University.
Duke University.–Medical Center.
Women in medicine.
History of Medicine–North Carolina–Personal Narratives.

Asa T. Spaulding — April 13, 1979

Title: Oral history interview with Asa T. Spaulding, April 13, 1979 [electronic resource] : interview C-0013-1, Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007).
Author: Spaulding, Asa T. (Asa Timothy), 1902-1990. Interviewee
Other author: Weare, Walter B, Interviewer.
Publisher: [Chapel Hill, N.C.] : University Library, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2008.
Location: Documenting the American South (website)
Call Number: http://docsouth.unc.edu/sohp/C-0013-1/menu.html
Format: internet resource (full text and audio)
Description: Asa T. Spaulding was born in rural North Carolina in 1902, but his scholastic aptitude soon removed him from the farm where he spent his childhood. After a high school education in Durham, North Carolina, Spaulding earned a degree from New York University and received training as an actuary at the University of Michigan. He returned to Durham to take a position at the North Carolina Mutual Life Insurance Company, a historically African American company where he spent his career seeking balance in his professional and personal life. He was president of the company from 1959 until he retired in 1969. Spaulding spends most of this interview describing his early life. He describes his rural community; he remembers applying his disciplined mind to his studies in New York City and Ann Arbor, Michigan, where he experienced some, but not much, racial discrimination; he recalls the transition from reliance on black burial associations to larger life insurance companies and his role in modernizing insurance practice; and he reflects on the nature of citizenship and humanity. Spaulding was a hard worker and a spiritual man who valued his time spent teaching the Bible. A self-reliant man, he cast his vote for Richard Nixon in 1972 but condemns him for his greed. This interview sheds light on a pioneering career and a set of beliefs behind a successful businessman and spiritually fulfilled person.
Time: 3:03:04
Subjects:
Spaulding, Asa T. (Asa Timothy), 1902-1990 — Interviews.
African American executives — North Carolina — Durham — Interviews.
North Carolina Mutual Life Insurance Company.
Life insurance — North Carolina.
African American business enterprises — North Carolina — Durham.
Farm life — North Carolina — Columbus County.
Columbus County (N.C.) — Social life and customs.
African American college students.
African Americans — North Carolina — Columbus County — Relations with Indians.

Asa T. Spaulding — April 14, 1979

Title: Oral history interview with Asa T. Spaulding, April 14, 1979 [electronic resource] : interview C-0013-2, Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007).
Author: Spaulding, Asa T. (Asa Timothy), 1902-1990. Interviewee
Other Author: Weare, Walter B, Interviewer.
Publisher: [Chapel Hill, N.C.] : University Library, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2008.
Location: Documenting the American South (website)
Call Number: http://docsouth.unc.edu/sohp/C-0013-2/menu.html
Format: internet resource (full text and audio)
Description: Asa T. Spaulding was born in rural North Carolina in 1902, but his scholastic aptitude soon removed him from the farm where he spent his childhood. After a high school education in Durham, North Carolina, Spaulding earned a degree from New York University and received training as an actuary at the University of Michigan. He returned to Durham to take a position at the North Carolina Mutual Life Insurance Company, a historically African American company where he spent his career seeking balance in his professional and personal life. He was president of the company from 1959 until he retired in 1969. Spaulding spends most of this interview describing his early life. He describes his rural community; he remembers applying his disciplined mind to his studies in New York City and Ann Arbor, Michigan, where he experienced some, but not much, racial discrimination; he recalls the transition from reliance on black burial associations to larger life insurance companies and his role in modernizing insurance practice; and he reflects on the nature of citizenship and humanity. Spaulding was a hard worker and a spiritual man who valued his time spent teaching the Bible. A self-reliant man, he cast his vote for Richard Nixon in 1972 but condemns him for his greed. This interview sheds light on a pioneering career and a set of beliefs behind a successful businessman and spiritually fulfilled person.
Time: 2:01:39
Subjects:
Spaulding, Asa T. (Asa Timothy), 1902-1990 — Interviews.
African American executives — North Carolina — Durham — Interviews.
Durham (N.C.) — Race relations.
African Americans — Civil rights — North Carolina — Durham.
Segregation — North Carolina — Durham.
Durham (N.C.) — Politics and government.
North Carolina Mutual Life Insurance Company.
African American business enterprises — North Carolina — Durham.
Lowry family.

Asa T. Spaulding — April 16, 1979

Title: Oral history interview with Asa T. Spaulding, April 16, 1979 [electronic resource] : interview C-0013-3, Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007).
Author: Spaulding, Asa T. (Asa Timothy), 1902-1990. Interviewee
Other Author: Weare, Walter B, Interviewer.
Publisher: [Chapel Hill, N.C.] : University Library, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2008.
Location: Documenting the American South (website)
Call Number: http://docsouth.unc.edu/sohp/C-0013-3/menu.html
Format: internet resource (full text and audio)
Description: Asa T. Spaulding was born in rural North Carolina in 1902, but his scholastic aptitude soon removed him from the farm where he spent his childhood. After a high school education in Durham, North Carolina, Spaulding earned a degree from New York University and received training as an actuary at the University of Michigan. He returned to Durham to take a position at the North Carolina Mutual Life Insurance Company, a historically African American company where he spent his career seeking balance in his professional and personal life. He was president of the company from 1959 until he retired in 1969. Spaulding spends most of this interview describing his early life. He describes his rural community; he remembers applying his disciplined mind to his studies in New York City and Ann Arbor, Michigan, where he experienced some, but not much, racial discrimination; he recalls the transition from reliance on black burial associations to larger life insurance companies and his role in modernizing insurance practice; and he reflects on the nature of citizenship and humanity. Spaulding was a hard worker and a spiritual man who valued his time spent teaching the Bible. A self-reliant man, he cast his vote for Richard Nixon in 1972 but condemns him for his greed. This interview sheds light on a pioneering career and a set of beliefs behind a successful businessman and spiritually fulfilled person.
Time: 4:24:17
Subjects:
Spaulding, Asa T. (Asa Timothy), 1902-1990 — Interviews.
African American executives — North Carolina — Durham — Interviews.
African American executives — North Carolina — Durham — Attitudes.
Durham (N.C.) — Race relations.
African Americans — Civil rights — North Carolina — Durham.
Segregation — North Carolina — Durham.
Durham Committee on Negro Affairs.
Durham (N.C.) — Politics and government.
North Carolina Mutual Life Insurance Company.
African American business enterprises — North Carolina — Durham.
African American politicians — North Carolina — Durham.
Wheeler, John H. (John Hervey)

Jean Spaulding

Title: Oral history interview with Jean Spaulding, 2006
Author: Spaulding, Jean.
Duke University. Medical Center. Archives and Memorabilia.
Location: Duke: Medical Center Library
Call Number: Oral History Collection Spaulding, 10/3/2006, Release Form, Transcript, CD
Location 2: Duke: Medical Center Library: http://medspace.mc.duke.edu/medwmn/gallery.php?id=23&cid=33&body=trans
Format: Book and online interview
Description: Jean Spaulding is the first African-American female to graduate from the Duke University School of Medicine, a member of the Duke University Health System Board of Directors, and a member of the Josiah Charles Trent Memorial Foundation, Inc. Board of Directors.Major subjects in this interview include Spaulding’s experiences as a woman and an African-American in Duke University’s Department of Psychiatry and the Durham community, as well as her administrative roles in the Duke University Health System. This interview was conducted on 3 October 2006 by Jessica Roseberry.
Subjects:
African Americans in Medicine
Duke University
Duke University Health System
Duke University–Dept of Psychiatry
Duke University–Medical Center
Duke University–School of Medicine
Durham (NC.)
History of Medicine–North Carolina–Personal Narratives
Hospital Administration
Spaulding, Jean
Women in Medicine

Jessie Streater

Title: Oral history interview with Jessie Streater, November 10, 2001 [electronic resource] : interview R-0165, Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007).
Author: Streater, Jessie. Interviewee
Other Author: Copeland, Barbara Anne, Interviewer.
Publisher: [Chapel Hill, N.C.] : University Library, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2008.
Location: Documenting the American South (website)
Call Number: http://docsouth.unc.edu/sohp/R-0165/menu.html
Format: internet resource (full text and audio)
Description: Jessie Streater, an African American mother of three, converted to Mormonism in 1979, just one year after the church relaxed its ban on African Americans holding the priesthood, a position in the church that conveys certain privileges and responsibilities. Streater had been a seeker, visiting churches of various denominations before finding Mormonism, a religion that offered her the religious community that she desired despite its relatively recent embrace of full membership for African American men. In this interview, Streater shares some observations about the growing African American population in the church, as well some descriptions of Mormon practices and church organization. African Americans’ greatest disadvantage is their relatively small number within the church, meaning that they often have to look outside Mormonism to find spouses. But overall, Streater has found only spiritual succor, and not discrimination, in her more than two decades with the church. Interviewers interested in race and religion, as well as some of the details of Mormon belief and practice, will find this interview useful.
Time: 1:14:10
Subjects:
Streater, Jessie — Interviews.
Mormon women — North Carolina — Durham — Interviews.
African American women — North Carolina — Durham — Interviews.
African American Mormons — Religious life — North Carolina — Durham.
Mormon women — Religious life — North Carolina — Durham.
Mormon Church — Customs and practices.
Race relations — Religious aspects.


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Josephine Turner

Title: : Oral history interview with Josephine Turner, June 7, 1976 [electronic resource] : interview H-0235-2, Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007).
Author: : Turner, Josephine, 1927-. Interviewee
Other Author: Sindelar, Karen, Interviewer
Publisher: : [Chapel Hill, N.C.] : University Library, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2008.
Location: : Documenting the American South (website)
Call Number: http://docsouth.unc.edu/sohp/H-0235-2/menu.html
Format: : internet resource (full text and audio)
Description: Josephine Turner was born in Durham, North Carolina, in 1927. At an early age, she experienced the sacrifices forced upon the poor, exemplified in her mother, who sought to impress upon Turner the value of education though she herself never made it past the third grade. She succeeded, but Turner followed in her mother’s footsteps when her father died, leaving school and inheriting her father’s job as a chauffeur at age fourteen. Turner’s ambition placed her in unique positions: a black female chauffeur, a businesswoman, a political aspirant. However, her willingness to experiment with different jobs, her devout religious faith, and her determination to succeed earned her more respect than wealth. In this interview she reflects on the fruits of her ambition, her background, her children, her working life, and her hopes for the future. This interview is more of a personal portrait than a window into labor, but it will be useful for researchers interested in life and work in North Carolina.
Time: 1:44:16
Subjects: Turner, Josephine, 1927- — Interviews.
African American women — North Carolina — Durham — Interviews.
African American women political activists — North Carolina — Durham — Interviews.
African Americans — North Carolina — Durham — Social conditions.
African Americans — North Carolina — Durham — Political activity.
African Americans — North Carolina — Durham — Social life and customs.

Viola Turner — April 15, 1979

Title: Oral history interview with Viola Turner, April 15, 1979 [electronic resource] : interview C-0015, Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007).
Author: Turner, Viola G., 1900-1988. Interviewee
Other Author: Weare, Walter B, Interviewer.
Publisher: [Chapel Hill, N.C.] : University Library, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2008.
Location: Documenting the American South (website)
Call Number: http://docsouth.unc.edu/sohp/C-0015/menu.html
Format: internet resource (full text and audio)
Description: In this part of an extended interview, Viola Turner, treasurer of North Carolina Mutual Insurance, reflects on her childhood in Macon, Georgia. Born on February 17, 1900, Turner was the only child of her African American teenage parents. Her remembrances are of those of a joyous childhood in which her mother encouraged her to excel in school. In her vivid depictions of Macon, Georgia, Turner describes a town in which segregation was not acutely visible. She was largely unaware of racial discrimination during her childhood. Nevertheless, she discusses at length her perceptions of skin color and the ways in which some of her lighter-toned African American friends were often treated differently from those with darker skin. Educated at the American Missionary Association schools and Morris Brown, Turner’s first job was as an administrative assistant at Tuskegee Institute in Alabama in the summer of 1920. Shortly thereafter she took a job working for the Superintendent of Negro Education for the State of Mississippi, which she held for six months before going to work for the new branch of North Carolina Mutual that opened in Oklahoma City in 1920. Turner eventually settled in Durham, North Carolina. The latter portion of this interview focuses on her descriptions of entertainment and race relations. Specifically, Turner describes her interaction with various black performers and her experiences attending both black and white theaters in Durham. In addition, she explains her friendship with Eula Perry—who could easily “pass” for white—and the reactions their friendship elicited from various observers.
Time: 3:52:00
Subjects:
Turner, Viola G., 1900-1988 — Interviews.
African American women executives — North Carolina — Durham — Interviews.
African Americans — Georgia — Macon — Social life and customs.
Macon (Ga.) — Race relations.
Segregation — Georgia — Macon.
African Americans — North Carolina — Durham — Social life and customs.
Durham (N.C.) — Race relations.
Segregation — North Carolina — Durham.
African Americans — Race identity — Southern States.

Viola Turner — April 17, 1979

Title: Oral history interview with Viola Turner, April 17, 1979 [electronic resource] : interview C-0016, Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007).
Author: Turner, Viola G., 1900-1988. Interviewee
Other Author: Weare, Walter B, Interviewer.
Publisher: [Chapel Hill, N.C.] : University Library, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2008.
Location: Documenting the American South (website)
Call Number: http://docsouth.unc.edu/sohp/C-0016/menu.html
Format: internet resource (full text and audio)
Description: This is the second part of an extensive two-part interview with Viola Turner, former treasurer of North Carolina Mutual in Durham and first woman on its executive board. Turner continues her vividly detailed discussion of early twentieth-century race relations from the first interview, beginning with several anecdotes about her experiences with racial discrimination while traveling by train in both the North and the South. She describes an itinerant musician she encountered in a Jim Crow train car while en route to Memphis, an experience she uses as a segue for discussing the Mississippi Blues as an especially unique form of regional African American popular culture. Although Turner argues that the Mississippi Blues was not pervasive in Durham (where she had settled in 1924), she explains that the city did have a thriving African American culture. After describing elaborate social gatherings for dancing and music within the African American community (particularly for the black middle class), Turner describes how community leaders worked to bring in prominent African American performers. According to Turner, the intricate social network of African Americans in Durham was integral in supporting African American professionals who traveled through the South. Turner also devotes considerable attention to describing the role of African American community leaders, including Dr. James E. Shepard of North Carolina Central University and C. C. Spaulding of North Carolina Mutual. As an employee of North Carolina Mutual, Turner had a unique relationship with Spaulding. She describes him as a paternal figure (she and other employees called him “Poppa”) and offers numerous anecdotes about how he looked out for his employees. She recounts, for instance, how Spaulding ensured that his employees had the opportunity to vote by personally accompanying them through the registration process. Turner provides insight into the inner operations of North Carolina Mutual as a landmark African American business in Durham, and stresses its central role within the community. In addition, she discusses her perception of nascent civil rights efforts, such as the formation of the Durham Committee on Negro Affairs; the effort of the NAACP on behalf of Thomas Hocutt to integrate the law school of the University of North Carolina; and lingering racial tensions in Durham. Finally, Turner offers commentary on gender dynamics, sharing her thoughts on instances of sex discrimination at North Carolina Mutual, expectations of single women workers within the community, and relationships: she describes her two short-term marriages in the 1920s, and concludes the interview with a long discussion of her third husband and his support of her work and in the home.
Time: 6:28:10
Subjects:
Turner, Viola G., 1900-1988 — Interviews.
African American women executives — North Carolina — Durham — Interviews.
African Americans — North Carolina — Durham — Social life and customs.
Durham (N.C.) — Race relations.
North Carolina Mutual Life Insurance Company — Employees.
African American women in the professions — North Carolina — Durham.
African Americans — Civil rights — North Carolina — Durham.
Spaulding, C. C. (Charles Clinton), 1874-1952.


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Gregory Weeks

Title: Interview with the Honorable Gregory A. Weeks
Author:
Yvone E. Bulluck.
Weeks, Gregory A.
Bulluck, Yvonne E.
Law School Oral History Project (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. School of Law.
Publisher: [Chapel Hill, N.C.] : University of North Carolina, c1994.
Location: UNC – Chapel Hill Libraries: Law Library
Call Number: KFN7925 .W44 1994
Format: Archival Materials: Photocopy of Transcript of interview
Description: 61 leaves ; 28 cm.
Note: Photocopy of the original typewritten transcript of the taped interview of the Honorable Gregory A. Weeks in Judges’ Chambers Durham County Judicial Building, Durham, North Carolina, April 12, 1994 and April 14, 1994.
“Original transcript on deposit at the Southern Historical Collection, Louis Round Wilson Library.”
Subjects:
Weeks, Gregory A. — Interviews.
Weeks, Gregory A.
Lawyers — North Carolina — Interviews.
Judges — North Carolina — Interviews.

Willis P. Whichard

Title: Interview with Justice Willis P. Whichard
Author:
Ryan Smith.
Whichard, Willis P.
Law School Oral History Project (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)
Smith, Ryan.
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. School of Law.
Publisher: [Chapel Hill, N.C.] : University of North Carolina, c1996.
Location: UNC – Chapel Hill Libraries: Law Library
Call Number: KFN7925 .W54 1996
Format: Book
Description: 8 leaves ; 28 cm.
Note: Photocopy of the original typewritten transcript of the taped interview of Justice Willis P. Whichard in Durham, N.C. on February 27, 1996, March 18, 1996 and March 25, 1996.”Original transcript on deposit at the Southern Historical Collection, Louis Round Wilson Library.”
Subjects:
Whichard, Willis P.
Whichard, Willis P. — Interviews.
Judges — North Carolina — Interviews.
Legislators — North Carolina — Interviews.
Lawyers — North Carolina — Interviews.

William E. White, Jr.

Title: Oral history interview with William E. White Jr., October 29, 2000 [electronic resource] : interview R-0147, Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007).
Author: White, William E. (William Earl). Interviewee
Other Author: Otto, Kent.
Crowe, Ashley, Interviewer.
Publisher: [Chapel Hill, N.C.] : University Library, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2008.
Location: Documenting the American South (website)
Call Number: http://docsouth.unc.edu/sohp/R-0147/menu.html
Format: internet resource (full text and audio)
Description: In this interview, William E. White Jr. describes his encounters with religion, race, and sexuality. Bored by the routines of his Baptist church, White sought something more energetic. He found this energy in the Charismatic Renewal movement, a fellowship of dissatisfied Christians seeking an intimate, powerful religious experience. White confronted his racial identity as a white student at Southern High School, one of the first high schools to integrate in the Durham, North Carolina, area, and at North Carolina Central University, a historically black school where his last name symbolized his outsider status. He also confronted his sexual identity as he struggled with being gay, but he eventually came to terms with what he calls his internalized homophobia. White discusses additional challenges, including his parents’ difficult divorce, a turbulent relationship with his father, and his struggle with AIDS, a disease that frightens him but which, he says, has enabled him to take risks he would not have taken before. This interview is an intimate portrait of a man standing at the intersection of spiritual fulfillment, race, and sexuality.
Time: 1:04:32
Subjects:
White, William E. (William Earl) — Interviews.
Christian gay men — North Carolina — Durham — Interviews.
Pentecostals — North Carolina — Durham — Interviews.
AIDS (Disease) — Patients — North Carolina — Durham — Interviews.
Gays — Identity.
Christian gay men — Family relationships — North Carolina — Durham.
Durham (N.C.) — Race relations.

Frances K. Widmann

Title: Oral history interview with Frances K Widmann, 2007.
Author: Widmann, Frances K.
Location: Duke: Medical Center Library
Call Number: Oral History Collection Transcript and CD
Format: Includes a CD and transcript. Finding aid in repository and on the Web.
Interviewed by Jessica Roseberry on November 28, 2007.
Description: Former director of the Durham Veterans Administration Hospital blood bank and faculty member in Duke’s Department of Pathology. Includes a CD and transcript of an oral history interview with Frances K. Widmann. Major subjects in this interview include Widmann’s experiences as a woman at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Duke University Medical Center, and the Durham Veterans Administration Hospital.
Subjects:
Widmann, Frances K.–1935-
Duke University.
Duke University.–Medical Center.
Duke University.–Dept. of Pathology.
Blood banks.
Veterans Administration Hospital (Durham, N.C.)
Women in medicine.
History of Medicine–North Carolina–Personal Narratives.

R. Sanders Williams

Title: Oral history interview with R Sanders Williams, 2004.
Author: Williams, R. Sanders (Robert Sanders), 1948-
Interviewed by Jessica Roseberry in Durham, N.C. on February 4, 2004.
Location: Duke: Medical Center Library
Call Number: Oral History Collection, 7c Williams, 2/4/04, Tape 1, Transcript
Format: Contains audiotapes and transcript of an oral history interview recorded on cassette tapes.
Description: Major subjects medical education, School of Medicine, and Duke University Medical Center administration.
Subjects:
Williams, R. Sanders–(Robert Sanders)–1948-
Duke University.–Medical Center.
Duke University.–School of Medicine.
Education, Medical.
History of Medicine–North Carolina–Personal Narratives.
Physicians–Interview.

James B. Wyngaarden — 1982

Title: Oral history interview with James B Wyngaarden, 1982.
Author: Wyngaarden, James B., 1924-
Location: Duke: Medical Center Library
Call Number: Oral History Collection, 7c Wyngaarden, 4/9/82, Tape 1Oral History Collection, 7c Wyngaarden, 4/9/82, Tape 1, Tape 2, Transcript
Format: Contains audiotapes and transcript of an oral history interview recorded on cassette tapes.
Description: Professor and administrator of Duke University Hospital and the Veteran’s Administration Hospital of Durham, N.C. . Major subjects in this interview include Duke University School of Medicine, the Department of Medicine, the research training program, clinical competencies, National Institutes of Health, and Eugene A. Stead, Jr.
Subjects:
Clinical Competence
Duke University
Duke University–Medical Center
Duke University–School of Medicine
History of Medicine–North Carolina–Personal Narratives
National Institutes of Health (US)
Physicians–Interview
Stead, Eugene A
Wyngaarden, James B,–1924-

James B. Wyngaarden — 2005

Title: Oral history interview with James B Wyngaarden, 2005
Author: Wyngaarden, James B., 1924-
Format: Manuscript
Location: Duke Medical Center Library
Description: Former professor and administrator of Duke University Medical Center.
Contains audiotape and transcript of an oral history interview with James B. Wyngaarden. Major subjects in this interview include Wyngaarden’s experiences as a physician and administrator in Duke University Medical Center’s Department of Medicine and at the National Institutes of Health, including his leadership of the human genome project.
Subjects:
Duke University.
Duke University.–Medical Center.
Duke University.–Medical Center.–Dept. Medicine.
Howard Hughes Medical Institute.
Human Genome Project.
Research.
National Institutes of Health (U.S.)
Wyngaarden, James B.–1924-
History of Medicine–North Carolina–Personal Narratives.

James B. Wyngaarden — 2007

Title: Oral history interview with James B Wyngaarden, 2007
Author: Wyngaarden, James B., 1924-
Location: Duke Medical Center Library
Format: Internet resource, Manuscript; Online Version includes Exhibit, Audio clip, Transcript
Description: Former professor and administrator of Duke University Medical Center.
Contains CD and transcript of an oral history interview with James B. Wyngaarden. Major subjects in this interview include Dr. Grace Kerby.
Subjects:
Duke University.
Duke University.–Medical Center.
Duke University.–Medical Center.–Dept. of Medicine.
Kerby, Grace P.
Women in medicine.
Wyngaarden, James B.–1924-
History of Medicine–North Carolina–Personal Narratives.


Interview Collections

Title: Allen Building Takeover collection, 1969-2002
Author: Duke University. University Archives.
Location: Duke University Archives
Call Number: Cage Box 1 c.1 and Cage Box 2 c.1
Format: Manuscript
Description: On February 13, 1969, Duke University students in the Afro-American Society occupied the the main administration building to bring attention to the needs of black students. This and subsequent events became known as the Allen Building Takeover.
Collection contains announcements, flyers, publications, correspondence, handouts, reports, transcripts, ephemera, clippings, a bibliography, WDBS radio broadcasts, oral histories, and photographs documenting Black Culture Week (Feb. 4-12, 1969), the Allen Building Takeover, student demands, statements by provost Marcus Hobbs and by Duke president Douglas Knight, student convocations and demonstrations both in support of and against the Takeover, and later events on the Duke campus and in Durham, N.C. In addition, the collection contains clippings and artwork related to remembering the Takeover, including the 2002 Allen Building lock-in. Major subjects include African American students and civil rights demonstrations.
Subjects:
African American student movements
African American students–North Carolina–Durham
African Americans–North Carolina–History–1964-
Civil rights demonstrations
College students, Black–North Carolina
Duke University–Administration
Duke University–Afro-American Society
Duke University–Buildings–History–20th century
Duke University–History
Duke University–Students–Social conditions
Hobbs, Marcus E,–1909-
Knight, Douglas M
Race relations
Student participation in administration
Students, Black–North Carolina
Students–Political activity
WDBS Radio (Radio station: Durham, NC)
Individual Names in Finding Aid:
Armstrong, Brenda — RESTRICTED: Transcript, no release form
Budd, Louis — Open: Transcript with release form; No cassette
Cahow, Clark — Open: Transcript with release form; Reference copy of cassette
Campbell, Tom — Open: Transcript with release form
DeMik, Harry — RESTRICTED: Transcript, no release form
Newsome, Clarence — RESTRICTED: Transcript, no release form
Pye, Kenneth — Open: Transcript, no release form (subject deceased)
Turner, Bill — RESTRICTED: Transcript, no release form; Reference copy of cassette
Williams, Fred — RESTRICTED: Transcript, no release form
Williams, Janice — Open: Transcript with release form
Griffith, William — RESTRICTED: No transcript or release form
Cell, John — Open: No transcript, no release form (subject deceased)
Cook, Samuel — RESTRICTED: No transcript, no release form
Hammond, Samuel — RESTRICTED: No transcript, no release form
Semans, Mary — RESTRICTED: No transcript, no release form; Reference copy of cassette
Kerckhoff, Alan — RESTRICTED: No transcript, no release form; Reference copy of cassette
Watson, Richard — RESTRICTED: No transcript, no release form; Reference copy of cassette
Web address: http://library.duke.edu/digitalcollections/rbmscl/uaallenbldg/inv/; http://search.trln.org/search?id=DUKE003309392#tab5
Persons from Durham:
Armstrong, Brenda
Budd, Louis
Cahow, Clark
Campbell, Tom
Cell, John
Cook, Samuel
DeMik, Harry
Griffith, William
Hammond, Samuel
Kerckhoff, Alan
Newsome, Clarence
Pye, Kenneth
Semans, Mary
Turner, Bill
Watson, Richard
Williams, Fred
Williams, Janice


Title: American Communities Oral History Collection, 1996-1997; * Behind the Veil: Documenting African-American Life in the Jim Crow South
Author: Duke University. Center for Documentary Studies; John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African-American Documentation.
Location: Duke: Special Collections Library
Call Number: Manuscripts: 6th 18:C (master copies, box 1)(00-183) items1-100 c.1, 2nd 69:K (use copies, boxes 2-3) (00-183) Box 2, 2nd 69:K (use copies, boxes 2-3) (00-183) Box 3
Format: Archival Materials, tapes, transcripts
Description: American Communities: An Oral History Approach was a course associated with the oral history project Behind the Veil at Duke’s Center for Documentary Studies. The course was taught by Paul Ortiz at Duke University in 1996-1997.
Collection (00-183) includes a course syllabus, interviews of African-American North Carolinians on cassette tapes, some student self-evaluations, contracts, indices, and transcript excerpts. The area most represented is Durham, N.C. Students were to aim for insight into how African-Americans built communities during an age of racial oppression. The interviews include much information about family history and social and community issues. Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African-American Documentation.
Subjects:
African American families–North Carolina
African Americans–Segregation
African Americans–Social conditions
African Americans–Social life and customs
Behind the Veil Project
Durham (NC.)–Social life and customs.
Oral history
Web address: http://search.trln.org/search?id=DUKE002779171
Restrictions: unprocessed collection


Title: Audio Documentary Institute student projects, 2003 Summer
Author: Duke University. Center for Documentary Studies.
Location: Duke: Special Collections Library
Call Number: Library Service Center Acc. 06/035: Box 1, c.1
Format: Archival Materials, tapes, transcripts
Description: Collection comprises 11 oral history projects on twenty-five audiocassette tapes and one 3.5 floppy computer disk. The segments were created for radio broadcast and the general theme for the histories is tobacco agriculture and production in Durham and Orange counties, North Carolina. Specific topics include: Durham Bulls, architecture, auctioneers, organic tobacco farming, American Spirit tobacco, and anti-smoking campaigns, among others. Use copies must be created before patrons may access the collection.
Subjects: Duke University–Center for Documentary Studies
Web address: http://search.trln.org/search?id=DUKE003797576
Restrictions: unprocessed collection


Title: Behind the Veil: Documenting African-American Life in the Jim Crow South 1940-1997 and n.d. (bulk 1993-1997).
Author: Duke University. Center for Documentary Studies. Behind the Veil Project. John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African-American Documentation.
Location: Duke: Special Collections Library
Call Number: 2nd 93:G-S, OC:VI:14 c.1, Library Service Center Fully Processed:Box MT 1 c.1 – Box MT 14 c.1, Library Service Center Acc. 04/344: Box 1 c. 1 – Box 5 c.1, 2nd 93:G-J UT 1 – 14, 2nd 93:G-J PM1 – 9, 2nd 91:F Box TR1 – TR18
Location 2: finding aid: http://library.duke.edu/digitalcollections/rbmscl/btv/inv/
Format: Archival Materials, tapes, transcripts
Description: The Behind the Veil Oral History Project was undertaken by Duke University’s Lyndhurst Center for Documentary Studies in 1990. It seeks to record and preserve the living memory of African-American life during the age of legal segregation in the American South, from the 1890s to the 1950.
Addition (04-344) (3000 items, 3 lin. ft.; dated 1940-1997) comprises slides related to African American life in the 20th century with a focus on the Jim Crow Era.
Subjects:
African Americans–Segregation
African Americans–Social conditions
African Americans–Social life and customs
Albany (Ga)–Social life and customs.
Behind the Veil Project
Birmingham (Ala)–Social life and customs.
Charlotte (NC.)–Social life and customs.
Columbia (SC.)–Social life and customs.
Duke University–Center for Documentary Studies
Durham (NC.)–Social life and customs.
Enfield (NC.)–Social life and customs.
Fargo (Ark)–Social life and customs.
Kentucky–Social life and customs
Memphis (Tenn)–Social life and customs.
New Bern (NC.)–Social life and customs.
New Iberia (La)–Social life and customs.
New Orleans (La)–Social life and customs.
Norfolk (Va)–Social life and customs.
Oral history
Orangeburg (SC.)–Social life and customs.
Racism–Southern States
Segregation–Southern States
St Helena (S.C.)–Social life and customs.
Summerton (SC.)–Social life and customs.
Tallahassee (Fla)–Social life and customs.
Tuskegee (Ala)–Social life and customs.
United States–Race relations
Wilmington (NC.)–Social life and customs.
Individual Names in Finding Aid:
Atwater, Ann
Blue, Ila
Blunt, Russell
Brinkley, Harriette
Brodie, Arthur
Bryant, Artelia
Bryant, R.
Butterfield, George
Bynum, Ernestine
Cherry, Willie
Clement, William
Crockett, Manuel
Davis, Willie, Jr.
Duncan, Anne
Edmonds, Vivian
Fitts, Howard, Jr.
Garrett, York
Hinton, Collins
Hughley, Sadie
Knight, Christopher
Lee, James
Livingston, Omeda
Lucas, Julia
Lyons, Theresa
Malone, Calvin
McCandies, Emily
McCoy, Vivian
McCullers, Henderson
McCullers, Patricia
Mimms, Horace
Moore, III, Malvin
Owens, Sam
Page, Benjamin
Page, Mildred
Price, Hastie
Quigless, Milton
Rivera, Alexander
Sanders, Easter
Sanders, James
Scarborough, George
Tapp, Peggy
Taylor, Jennie
Turner, Margaret
West End Oral History Project
White, Clarence
White, Nathaniel
Wilson, Sandra
Web address: http://search.trln.org/search?id=DUKE002520450


Title: Bill Phillips collection, 1973-1975 [manuscript].
Author:
Phillips, Bill.
Lukas, Vic.
Poss, Barry.
Pridgen, Sam, 1910-
Roberts, Dink.
Trice, Willie, 1910-1976.
Location: UNC – Chapel Hill Libraries: Archival Materials (Wilson Library) Southern Folklife Collection
Call Number: FT1709- 1720
Format: Archival Materials, audio recordings
Description: Recordings of Dink Roberts, African American banjo player, slide guitarist, and singer, of Haw River, N.C., joined by family and friends, playing blues, old-time, and sacred music, with dancing, patting, and information interviews; Sam Pridgen (1910- ), Anglo-American string band guitarist, of Durham, N.C., discussing work in the hosiery mill in Durham, N.C., and his musical career in the 1930s and 1940s with string bands such as the Tobacco Tags and the Swingbillies in North Carolina and Richmond, Va.; and Willy Trice (1910-1976), African American blues singer and guitarist, of Durham County, N.C., performing blues.
Subjects:
African American musicians–North Carolina–Interviews.
African Americans–North Carolina–Music.
Alamance County (N.C.)–Songs and music.
Banjo music.
Blues (Music)–North Carolina.
Dance music–North Carolina.
Durham County (N.C.)–Songs and music.
Guitar music (Blues)
Musicians–North Carolina–Interviews.
North Carolina–Songs and music.
Old-time music–North Carolina.
Oral history.
Pridgen, Sam, 1910-
Richmond (Va.)–Songs and music.
Roberts, Dink, 1894-1989.
Sacred songs.
Textile workers–North Carolina–Social conditions.
Trice, Willie, 1910-1976.
Web address: http://search.trln.org/search?id=UNCb2454196


Title: Bones & burials [sound recording]
Author: Gwendolyn Parker ; John Gregory Brown. Speaking freely / Vincent Blasi.
Publisher: R.T.P. [i.e. Research Triangle Park], NC : National Humanities Center, 1994.
Location: Duke University Archives: Library Service Center (Reading Room only)
Call Number: CD R736 1994 Oct. 30, Nov. 6 c.1
Format: Music Vinyl Record
Description: Program 735 (29 min.) : Gwendolyn Parker’s first novel These Same Long Bones has as its theme loss and healing. John Gregory Brown is the author of Decorations in a Ruined Cemetery, a story of race and personal identity in the context of a Southern family. Program 736 (29 min.) : Vincent Blasi examines the limits and meaning of the free speech clause of the First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution.
Subjects:
Parker, Gwendolyn M.
Blasi, Vincent, 1943-
Brown, John Gregory.
Pond, Wayne Johnston.
Authors, American–20th century–Interviews
Family–North Carolina–Durham
Fathers and daughters
Freedom of speech–United States
Southern States–Race relations
African Americans–North Carolina–Durham
Web address: http://search.trln.org/search?id=DUKE001761495


Title: Brett Sutton and Peter Hartman collection, 1976 [manuscript].
Author:
Hartman, Peter, 1959-
Sutton, Brett.
Location: UNC – Chapel Hill Libraries: Manuscripts Dept Southern Folklife Collection
Call Number: 20042
Format: Archival Materials; sound recordings
Description: Brett Sutton (1948- ) was born and raised in Champaign-Urbana, Ill. He eared as Masters degree in 1976 from the Curriculum of Folklore at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. His thesis focused on African American spiritual folk singing around Raleigh and Durham, N.C. Peter Hartman (1959- ) earned a B.S. in 1975 UNC. Hartman, also a banjo player, joined Brett Sutton to explore their mutual interest in religious folk music. In 1976, they moved to southwestern Virginia where they worked on an NEH-funded project called “Religious Folksongs in the Virginia Mountains.” From this research, they produced a book and LP recording called Primitive Baptist Hymns of the Blue Ridge (UNC Press, 1982).
Sound recordings and documentation relating to Sutton and Hartman’s NEH project. The folk hymn singing tradition of conservative Baptists in southwestern Virginia in worship services and congregational meetings were recorded in rural churches, and interviews and songs were collected in congregation members’ homes. Supplemental information and transcripts include indices of texts, songs, and informants. Also available is an inventory and comparative summary of tunes collected and the NEH grant application, which includes a narrative about the purpose, significance, and scope of the project.
Subjects:
African American Baptists–Virginia.
African Americans–Virginia–Religion.
Blue Ridge Mountains–Religious life and customs.
Blue Ridge Mountains–Social life and customs.
Church music–Primitive Baptists.
Church music–Virginia.
Folk music–Virginia.
Folklorists.
Gospel music–Virginia.
Hartman, Peter, 1959-
Hymns, English–Virginia.
Primitive Baptists–Hymns.
Primitive Baptists–Virginia.
Shape-note singing.
Spirituals (Songs)–Virginia.
Sutton, Brett.
Virginia, Southwest–Social life and customs.
Virginia–Religious life and customs.
Virginia–Social life and customs.
Virginia–Songs and music.
Web address: http://search.trln.org/search?id=UNCb4484549; http://www.lib.unc.edu/mss/inv/s/Sutton,Brett_and_Peter_Hartman.html


Title: Collection, 1973-1978, 1992, and nd.
Author: Duke University. Oral History Program.
Location: Duke: Special Collections Library
Call Number: 2nd 52:C, 70:D items1-810 c.1
Location 2: http://library.duke.edu/digitalcollections/rbmscl/duohp/inv/
Format: Audiotapes, Transcripts, and Research Files.
Description: Collection containing 238 oral history interviews conducted by project participants in the years 1973-1978 and 1992. Most interviews deal with the civil rights movement in North Carolina, especially Durham, Chapel Hill, and Greensboro. Thirteen interviews deal with the Tulsa Race Riots, and fourteen cover miscellaneous North Carolina topics. Collection also includes transcripts and research files related to the civil rights movement in North Carolina.
Subjects:
African Americans–Civil rights–North Carolina
Agriculture–North Carolina–History
Baker, Ella–1903-1986
Civil rights demonstrations–North Carolina
Civil rights movements–North Carolina–Chapel Hill–History–20th century
Civil rights movements–North Carolina–Durham–History–20th century
Civil rights movements–North Carolina–Greensboro–History–20th century
Civil rights workers–North Carolina
Ellsworth, Scott–Death in the Promised Land
Haley, Alex–Roots
North Carolina–History–20th century
North Carolina–Race relations
Riots–Oklahoma–Tulsa
Sanford, Terry–1917-1998
Individual Names in Finding Aid:
Adams, Charlotte
Albright, J. W.
Ashby, Warren
Atwater, Ann
Atwater, Lula
Augustine, Joe (2 cassettes)
Baker, Ella (4 cassettes)
Baker, Quinton (2 cassettes)
Quinton Baker/Pat Cusick (2 cassettes)
Black & White Duke Students & Employees
Boulware, C. E.
Bowers, Wayne & Mary (2 cassettes)
Bowles, Charles (Mrs.)
Brown, Bob
Bulkley, Joel
Bynum, Barbara
Bynum, Sheila
Caldwell, Edwin Jr. (3 cassettes)
Caldwell, Hillard (2 cassettes)
Calhoun, Dick
Campbell, Sharon
Carswell, John
Clarence & Wife
Clark, A. D.
Collier, Cobb III
Cotton, Charlie Pearl
Curitan, William (2 cassettes)
Cusick, Pat (4 cassettes)
Dansby, David
Dowdy, Lewis
Dunne, John
Evans, Docea
Fitts, Howard
Foster, Haddie B. (2 cassettes)
Foster, Harold (3 cassettes)
Foster, J., N. Coley & K. Troxler
Foushee, Charles (2 cassettes)
Foushee, James
Foushee, Vivian (2 cassettes)
Foushee, W. R. (2 cassettes)
Foushee, W. M.
French, Virginia (2 cassettes)
Giduz, Roland (3 cassettes)
Gulick, Margaret (2 cassettes)
Harris, Maggie Scott
Hicks, Charles and “Tink” Farrell
Hill, George Watts
Hill, Watts Jr.
Hudgens, Eula
Hughley, Sadie
Jarrett, H. & E. Edmonds
Jones, Charles (3 cassettes)
Kerley, Jack
Khazan, J. (formerly Ezell Blair, Jr.)
Klopfer, Peter
Lassiter, Gaitha (2 cassettes)
Lee, Howard (2 cassettes)
Lineberry, Al
Malone, C. C. (2 cassettes)
Manley, J. R. (2 cassettes)
Mark, Carolyn
McClamrock, Sandy? (3 cassettes)
McCoy, Cleo
McDougall, C. A. and wife
McLaurin, Bessie
Morehead, David
Moseley, Alexander
Osborne, Robert
Perry, Velma
Phelps, Jake (2 cassettes)
Phelps, Jon
Queen, Anne
Richardson, John
Ruffin, Ben
Sanford, Terry
Schumaker, Jim (2 cassettes)
Scroggs, Ross (2 cassettes)
Box 2
Seiber, Hal
Smith, David
Smith, Reginald (2 cassettes)
Snider, William (2 cassettes)
Spearman, Walter
Straley, Joe (2 cassettes)
Strowd, Gene
Sturdivant & Jones, Carrboro Barber
Timerlake or Timberlake, Phyllis
Wager, Paul
Wallace, James
Walters, Adelaide
Weaver, Susie
Williams, P. A.
Wilson, Hugh (3 cassettes)
Unidentified (2 cassettes)
North Carolina Civil Rights Movement: Marcellus Barksdale Tapes
Arrington, M & S. J. Cochran, L. Cooke (2 cassettes)
Bazemore, P. E.
Belton, Edward (2 cassettes)
Caldwell, Hilliard
Campbell, J. A. and A. C. Cofield
Clemonts, J. and M. Boone
Cochran, Doris (2 cassettes)
Cofield, A. C. and daughter
Costy, W. and Mrs. A. C. Mathews
Faison, John W.
Hathaway, A. and E. Rushing
Hilliard, I. H.
Matthews, A. C. (Mrs.)
Moseley, Leroy
Robinson, Louisiana
Rorie, Magadalen Gillespie
Rushing, James
Sada, Rev.
Walker, James R. (3 cassettes)
Weaver, P. and R. D. Smith
Wilson, Woodrow
Winfield, B. J.
North Carolina Civil Rights Movement: Timothy Tyson & Larry Thomas Tapes
Banks, Daniel [pseudonym?] (2 cassettes)
Bordeaux, Walter
“C-Man”
Grant, Jim
Shepherd, A./Anon. [black male] (2 cassettes)
Templeton, Eugene (2 cassettes)
Yopp, Abbot D.
Web address: http://search.trln.org/search?id=DUKE002494272


Title: Cuentos de la comunidad: interviews, poetry and oral history from Durham’s Latino community
Author: compiled by Durham Latino youth ages 12-15 = Cuentos de la comunidad : entrevistas, poesía e historias orales de la comunidad latina en Durham / realizado por jovenes latinos en Durham de edades 12 á 15.
Publisher: Durham, N.C. : Duke University Center for Documentary Studies, [1998]
Location: UNC – Chapel Hill Libraries: North Carolina Collection
Call Number: Cp810.8 C965d
Format: Book
Subjects:
Durham (N.C.)–Social life and customs.
Hispanic American youth’s writings–North Carolina–Durham.
Hispanic American youth–North Carolina–Durham.
Web address: http://search.trln.org/search?id=UNCb4769685


Title: Cultural Perspectives of the 20th Century U.S. South Student Papers, 1997.
Author: Duke University. Dept. of History.
Location: Duke: Special Collections Library
Call Number: Library Service Center Box1 c.1
Format: Manuscript
Description: Cultural Perspectives of the 20th Century U.S. South was an course taught by professor John Howard at Duke University in Fall 1997. Includes eight term papers composed based on oral interviews students conducted as a course requirement. Five of the papers include transcriptions of the interviews held, but no audio tapes. Three papers contain only indexes to taped interviews, no audio tapes or transcripts are present. One paper includes three audio cassettes, with an index, from the interview conducted. Topics include “Southern Woman as Politician and Mother;” “Women’s Perspective of Duke in the 1970s;” a history of the Glen Raven Textile Mills near Burlington, N.C.; African-Americans and racism in the workforce; Durham, N.C., school desegregation; and church-and-state issues in the South. (01-065)
Subjects:
Discrimination in employment–United States
Duke University–Dept of History
Duke University–History–20th century
Durham (NC.)–Race relations.
Glen Raven Mills Inc
Minorities–Employment–United States
Racism
Racism–Southern States–History–20th century
Religion and state–United States
School integration–North Carolina–Durham
Southern States–History–20th century
Southern States–Social conditions
Textile factories–North Carolina
Women–Southern States
Web address: http://search.trln.org/search?id=DUKE003067411#tab5
Restrictions: Unprocessed collection


Durham Civil Rights Heritage Project Oral Histories, Durham County Library

DURHAM COUNTY LIBRARY OWNS THESE ITEMS

Interviewee: Naomi Goldston
Interviewer:Will Atwater
Date: Jan. 19, 2004
Location: North Carolina Collection, Durham County Library
Description: Ms. Goldston talks about her experiences in the civil rights movement, the changes it brought about, and her belief in the importance of God and religion for society.

Interviewee: Kristin Herzog
Interviewer:Barbara Lau
Date: Nov. 14, 2003
Location: North Carolina Collection, Durham County Library
Description: Herzog, a German citizen who moved with her husband to Durham in 1960, worked with African-American children in Durham. Her husband, Duke divinity professor Frederick Herzog, advocated for integration in the area. They attended Pilgrim United Church of Christ, where they supported integration, and they once attended Covenant Church, the first attempt to start a racially mixed church in the area. Mr. Herzog was involved in the protests at Watts Motel and Restaurant south of Chapel Hill, which resulted in a prominent court case.

Interviewee: Luther Holman, Jr., and Mary Holman, mother
Interviewer:Will Atwater
Date: Jan. 18, 2004
Location: North Carolina Collection, Durham County Library
Description: Holman, Jr., talks primarily about family activities related to civil rights and neighborhood improvement as he was growing up. His father, Luther Holman, Sr., was a civil rights activist, neighborhood organizer, and advocate for Durham youth. His mother was the first black at the company where she worked.

Interviewee: Peter Klopfer
Interviewer:Jim Wise
Date: Nov. 15, 2003
Location: North Carolina Collection, Durham County Library
Description: Duke zoology professor Peter Klopfer speaks about the shock of coming to the South in the late 1950s and seeing integration first hand. He and his wife were among the founders of the Carolina Friends School, which from the beginning operated according to Quaker principles and admitted black and white children. He was involved in civil rights demonstrations and other activities in the area, including the Watts Motel and Restaurant demonstrations and subsequent court case. Klopfer’s case went all the way to the United States Supreme Court, which ruled in his favor. He also talks about his personal relationship with his black neighbors.

Interviewee: Charles Leslie
Interviewer:Will Atwater
Date: Jan. 18, 2004
Location: North Carolina Collection, Durham County Library
Description: Mr. Leslie speaks about his experiences in the Civil Rights Movement, including trips to Washington and other places to march, where he saw Dr. King. He also talks briefly about leaders of the Durham movement.

Interviewee: Oren Marsh
Interviewer:Cathy Abernathy
Date: Jan. 18, 2004
Location: North Carolina Collection, Durham County Library
Description: Mr. Marsh talks about starting first grade in Durham as a precocious five-year-old. He discusses his musical career as part of a band that opened for the Temptations, Four Tops, and Tina Turner, among other famous musicians. He relates his experience at one of the mass demonstrations at Durham’s Howard Johnson Restaurant and being relegated to the balcony at Durham’s Carolina Theatre. He talks about his aunt and uncle, who worked for the Nello Teer family and lived on the premises for many years, and and the irony when, years later, his son became close friends with Nello Teer IV. Another interesting family story concerns his daughter, who married a white man from Monroe, in Union County, NC. He talks about all his uneducated, determined parents did to make sure their children had a better life than they had had. He talks about being the musician for Durham’s annual Civil Rights Workers Reunion and his reading of and love for black history.

Interviewee: Beulah Mason
Interviewer:Spencie Love
Date: Jan. 18, 2004
Location: North Carolina Collection, Durham County Library
Description: Mrs. Mason talks about how she did not participate in civil rights activities because of her parents and her own fears for her safety and reviews some of her memories of the civil rights era.

Interviewee: Evelyn McKissick, Charmaine McKissick-Melton
Interviewer:Barbara Lau
Date: Nov. 15, 2003
Location: North Carolina Collection, Durham County Library
Description: Mrs. McKissick speaks about her efforts to get Durham schools integrated and her children’s experiences as pioneers in school integration. She talks frankly about the way they were treated and how she was a sort of caretaker for all the children in the early years of school integration, not just her own. She relates information about growing up in Asheville as a child of privilege. She talks about what it was like to be the wife of Floyd McKissick, a prominent lawyer and an activist in the local and national Civil Rights Movement—from the early years of their marriage to feeding 50 or 100 people who got invited home to dinner after a meeting to watching over his health in later years during his tenure as a judge. She talks about how she is different from other people both in her privileged background and her assertiveness and tells interesting stories to illustrate these qualities.

Interviewee: Fay Bryant Mayo
Interviewer:Jim Wise
Date: Nov. 14, 2003
Location: North Carolina Collection, Durham County Library
Access Restricted
Description: Ms. Mayo grew up in Wilson, NC, and came to Durham to attend North Carolina Central. She was very involved in Durham demonstrations, especially during her senior year at NCC. She also attended the 1963 March on Washington and took trips to Mississippi during that year. She worked briefly for the North Carolina Fund, which was created as a non-profit corporation with a mandate to create experimental projects in education, health, job training, housing, and community development. Ms. Mayo worked for many years in the Durham Public School system where she was a guidance counselor. During her time in the schools she conducted programs and activities for students about civil rights issues. She also reflects on how Durham has changed, especially in the areas of economic, housing, educational opportunities. She relates many interesting anecdotes.

Interviewee: Phyllis Nuchurch
Interviewer:Melissa Johnson and David Cecelski
Date: Oct. 3, 2003
Location: North Carolina Collection, Durham County Library
Description: Mrs. Nuchurch talks about her father, Fred Hines, who was vice-president of the AFL-CIO when American Tobacco and Liggett and Myers were unionized. He also belonged to the Durham Committee on Negro Affairs and the NAACP, worked to get people to the polls on election day, and was very active in his church, St. Mark AME Zion Church. Mrs. Nuchurch relates how her youngest daughter was one of the first black children to attend a traditionally white New Orleans school. She tells how she moved back to Durham to care for her father in the late sixties and the changes that had occurred in Durham during her time living elsewhere.

Interviewee: Jane Ryan
Interviewer:Melanie Wilmer
Date: Oct. 2, 2003
Location: North Carolina Collection, Durham County Library
Description: Ms. Ryan, white and in her late 70s, grew up in Charleston, South Carolina. She was living in Willamette, Illinois during the 1960s with her husband and seven children when she went south to Mississippi and Alabama to assist with civil rights activities. She marched many times , including with Martin Luther King, Jr. She moved to Durham in 1970 to attend North Carolina Central University in health education and has lived in Durham since. In her interview she reflects on these experiences, the impact of the movement on the country and on Durham. She was not involved in any organizing in Durham.

Interviewee: Annie C. Smith
Interviewer:Jim Wise
Date: Nov. 14, 2003
Location: North Carolina Collection, Durham County Library
Description: Mrs. Smith (black) was employed at Woolworth’s in Durham when the 1960 sit-ins took place. She relates her memories of the sit-ins and her rise from a maid to manager of the lunch counter. She talks about her and her family’s interactions with white people and her generally positive feelings about them. She came from a rural family and was not involved in the Civil Rights Movement.

Interviewee: Nathan L. Thomas
Interviewer:Jim Wise
Date: Nov. 15, 2003
Location: North Carolina Collection, Durham County Library
Description: Mr. Thomas, African American, was born and reared in south central Alabama. After high school he was drafted and then went to college in West Virginia. He came to Durham in 1959 to work at NC Mutual as a printer and in advertising/communications. He was involved in civil rights work in Alabama (helped drive people during the Montgomery bus boycott) and in North Carolina where he helped drive people sitting in and protesting downtown and at Howard Johnson. He worked on many local political campaigns including those for Gene Hampton, Josephine Clement, Bill Bell and Willie Lovett. In his interview he also discusses his feelings about the “non-violence” approach, his involvement in a Presbyterian Church discussion group, and his thoughts about the legacy of the Civil Rights Movement and how things are for African Americans today.

Interviewee: Virginia Williams
Interviewer:Barbara Lau
Date: Oct. 3, 2003
Location: North Carolina Collection, Durham County Library
Description: Ms. Williams was one of the students who participated in Durham’s June 1957 sit-in at the Royal Ice Cream Company. She relates her memories of that day, her father’s background as an NAACP in the 1940s and 50s and his pride in her activism, and her continued activism in Durham.

Interviewee: Jennifer Smith Wyatt
Interviewer:Barbara Lau, Brandon Dorsey
Date: Oct. 3, 2003
Location: North Carolina Collection, Durham Public Library
Description: Mrs. Wyatt talks about being in the first group of students to integrate Brogden Junior High School . She gives detailed information about growing up in Walltown—going to the various stores, playing with neighborhood children. She talks about race relations, including relationships with the white children at Brogden and Durham High and an incident at Duke Hospital where she and her sister were removed from the waiting room and taken to a waiting room for blacks while their mother was visiting someone. She discusses how much of Durham’s black history has been erased.


Title: Earlie E. Thorpe Oral History Collection, 1990-1992 [manuscript].
Location: UNC – Chapel Hill Libraries: Archival Materials (Wilson Library) Southern Historical Collection
Call Number: 4927
Format:
1. Audiotapes
2. Transcripts
2.1. Transcripts Corresponding to Series 1 Audiotapes
2.2. Other Transcripts
Description: Audiocassettes and transcripts of oral history interviews collected by students in Social Science courses taught by Alice Eley Jones at North Carolina Central University, Durham, N.C., 1990-1992. Interviewees are African Americans in North Carolina and other states. Interviews cover general life experiences and include discussions about race relations, civil rights, education, economics, social life, family life, and other topics.
Subjects:
African American families–North Carolina.
African Americans–Civil rights–History–20th century.
African Americans–Economic conditions–20th century.
African Americans–Education–History–20th century.
African Americans–North Carolina–Durham.
African Americans–North Carolina–History–20th century.
African Americans–Race relations–20th century.
African Americans–Social conditions–20th century.
African Americans–Social life and customs–20th century.
Jones, Alice Eley.
North Carolina–Race relations.
Oral history.
Race relations–History–20th century.
Individual Names in Finding Aid:
C-4927/01 Audiotaped interview by Roderick Daye with Alfred J. Daye, Jr., 6 December 1990.
C-4927/002 Audiotaped interview by James Walker, Jr., with Maelene Ellis and Betty Walker, 7 December 1990.
C-4927/003 Audiotaped interview by Tammy Cherry with Lenny B. Brown, 25 November 1990.
C-4927/004 Audiotaped interview by Kara Ann Fenner, with Mr. and Mrs. Elverse Fenner, 2 December 1990.
C-4927/005 Audiotaped interview by Yvette Charisse Smith with Loretta Britt, 23 November 1990.
C-4927/006 Audiotaped interview by Yvette Charisse Smith with Clarence Britt, 23 November 1990.
C-4927/007 Audiotaped interview by Etherose Rogers with Charlie E. Amos, 6 December 1990.
C-4927/008 Audiotaped interview by LaShawnya C. Lassiter with Pauline Freeman.
C-4927/009 Audiotaped interview by Michael Mills with Phillip Daye, 5 December 1990.
C-4927/010 Audiotaped interview by Walter R. Johnson with Gerth L. Mathis, 27 October 1990.
C-4927/011 Audiotaped interview by Yolanda Williams with Mae Alice Funderburk, 30 November 1990.
C-4927/012 Audiotaped interview by Barry S. Mims with William Peten, 2 November 1990.
C-4927/013 Audiotaped interview by Camille LaVelle Shepherd with Verna Mae Speight, 2 December 1990.
C-4927/014 Audiotaped interview by Felicia Lavonne Tillery with Cary Lou Tillery and Mary Lee James, 2 December 1990.
C-4927/015 Audiotaped interview by Keith Spencer with Myrtle Weeks, Goldie Spencer, and Mary Spencer, 7 December 1990.
C-4927/016 Audiotaped interview by Keith Spencer Keith with Myrtle Weeks, 9 April 1991.
C-4927/017 Audiotaped interview by Mable Ashford with Reginald Ashford, 7 December 1990.
C-4927/018 Audiotaped interview by Carson Wise with Carson E. Wise, 2 April 1991.
C-4927/019 Audiotaped interview by Coswaylo Harris with Doris Beckett, 30 November 1991.
C-4927/020 Audiotaped interview by Johnny Dempson with Paul A. Barbee, 10 November 1991.
C-4927/021 Audiotaped interview by Marilyn J. Walston with Benson N. Barnes, 30 November 1991.
C-4927/022 Audiotaped interview by Braunski Hall with Lolabelle Bynam, 27 November 1991.
C-4927/023 Audiotaped interview by Sharon Hart with Cynthia Baines, 1 December 1991.
C-4927/024 Audiotaped interview by Nicole Tillery with Rollin Buchanan, 5 December 1991.
C-4927/025 Audiotaped interview by Veronica Williamson with Lillie Anderson, 25 November 1991.
C-4927/026 Audiotaped interview by Yvette Brown with Kay Brown-Mills, 2 December 1991.
C-4927/027 Audiotaped interview by Keeya T. Gregory with Ellis L. Allen, 2 December 1991.
C-4927/028 Audiotaped interview by Lillian Hawk with Lilly Jane Allsbrooks, 2 December 1991.
C-4927/029 Audiotaped interview by Crystal Gilreath with Warren H. Brown, 29 November 1991.
C-4927/030 Audiotaped interview by Wanda Ford with Zorata Andrews, 30 November 1991.
C-4927/031 Audiotaped interview by Sylvia T. Kelly with Rennie C. Galbreath, 3 December 1991.
C-4927/032 Audiotaped interview by Tiffaney Edwards with Shirley Coley, 30 November 1991.
C-4927/033 Audiotaped interview by Rosalyn Penn with Willie P. Foy, 30 November 1991.
C-4927/034 Audiotaped interview by Greg C. McNeill with Donnie Cox, 5 December 1991.
C-4927/035 Audiotaped interview by Misty Chandrell Chambers with Elsie Poston, 6 December 1991.
C-4927/036 Audiotaped interview by Dawn Daughty with Mavis J. Daughtry, 1 December 1991.
C-4927/037 Audiotaped interview by Michael Kirk Daye with Marion Johnson Greer, 2 December 1991.
C-4927/038 Audiotaped interview by Sean Coward with Adolph Coward, 1 December 1991.
C-4927/039 Audiotaped interview by Shanel Smith with William S. Frederick, 2 December 1991.
C-4927/040 Audiotaped interview by Colonda LaToya Barnes with Mattie Pearl Deberry, 27 November 1991.
C-4927/041 Audiotaped interview by Holly Jarrett with Alfonso Jarerett, Sr., 1991.
C-4927/042 Audiotaped interview by Nelson Demond Adams with William Thomas Hargrove, 29 November 1991. The tape of this interview is broken; no listening copy is available.
C-4927/043 Audiotaped interview by Wanda Kaye Johnson with Betsy R. Johnson, 29 November 1991.
C-4927/044 Audiotaped interview by Charles Hammond with Anita W. Hammond, 5 December 1991.
C-4927/045 Audiotaped interview by Monique L. Hall with Gladys Renee Hall, 2 December 1991.
C-4927/046 Audiotaped interview by LaVinia Jackson with Earnest Horton, 10 November 1991.
C-4927/047 Audiotaped interview by Mark J. Manson with David L. Harrison, 5 December 1991.
C-4927/048 Audiotaped interview by Lakecia Y. Burden with Edna M. Hines, 1 December 1991.
C-4927/049 Audiotaped interview by Memo Kim-Marie Miller with Lucy Rebecca Cross Jones, 29 November 1991.
C-4927/050 Audiotaped interview by Marlana Devette Johnson with William Hall, 30 November 1991.
C-4927/051 Audiotaped interview by Toni Harris with Gloria Harris, 2 December 1991.
C-4927/052 Audiotaped interview by Tonya Joyner with Adell Joyner, 6 December 1991.
C-4927/053 Audiotaped interview by John Howard, Sr., with John E. Howard, Sr., 30 November 1991.
C-4927/054 Audiotaped interview by Shawna Lee with La-Belle Lee, 24 November 1991.
C-4927/055 Audiotaped interview by Daneen L. Carroll with Fay Kincaid, 20 November 1991.
C-4927/056 Audiotaped interview by Dezmona J. Mizelle with Richard M. Mizelle, 30 November 1991.
C-4927/057 Audiotaped interview by Bianca Barnes with Ruth McKeithan Mial, 4 December 1991.
C-4927/058 Audiotaped interview by Thim L. McLeod with Gene A. McLeod, 30 November 1991.
C-4927/059 Audiotaped interview by R. Wayne Johnson with Carrie B. McClellan.
C-4927/060 Audiotaped interview by Melodie Regina Richardson with Lillian E. T. Moore, 2 December 1991.
C-4927/061 Audiotaped interview by Renita A. Yates with Clara O. M. H. Roberson, 6 December 1991.
C-4927/062 Audiotaped interview by Dawn A. McClammy with William J. Stewart, Jr., 30 November 1991.
C-4927/063 Audiotaped interview by Rodney A. Edmonds with Henry C. Lattimore, 6 December 1991.
C-4927/064 Audiotaped interview by Ronda T. Alexander with Frances G. Simpson, 27 November 1991.
C-4927/065 Audiotaped interview by Rhonda R. Wilson with Margaret L. Perry, 4 December 1991.
C-4927/066 Audiotaped interview by Gwen L. Jackson with Henry L. Lucas, 1 December 1991.
C-4927/067 Audiotaped interview by Louis B. Perkins with Harriette Kennebrew Perkins, 23 November 1991.
C-4927/068 Audiotaped interview by Erica F. Daves with Mary W. Smith, 28 November 1991.
C-4927/069 Audiotaped interview by Ronderic Suggs with Mattie Pridgen, 29 November 1991.
C-4927/070 Audiotaped interview by Brian D. Patterson with James D. Patterson, Sr., 28 November 1991.
C-4927/071 Audiotaped interview by Milton Gainey with Laura Smith, 2 December 1991.
C-4927/072 Audiotaped interview by Tonya Stancil with Clifton R. Stancil, 30 November 1991.
C-4927/073 Audiotaped interview by Lena Foushee with Verlena Simmons, 2 December 1991.
C-4927/074 Audiotaped interview by Rhonda D. Leake with Phyllis Stark, 25 November 1991.
C-4927/075 Audiotaped interview by Tracey Spivey-White with Margaret H. Turner, 1 December 1991.
C-4927/076 Audiotaped interview by Nichelle Dodson with Otis B. Scott, 29 November 1991.
C-4927/077 Audiotaped interview by Roderick Green with Lucille R. Richardson, 20 November 1991.
C-4927/078 Audiotaped interview by Gary Murphy with Bertis Michaux, 29 November 1991.
C-4927/079 Audiotaped interview by Laurie N. Robinson with Frances P. Robinson, 26 November 1991.
C-4927/080 Audiotaped interview by Tiffani M. Guy with Elaine Tucker, 26 November 1991.
C-4927/081 Audiotaped interview by Tangelique M. Williams with Angela Williams, 1 December 1991.
C-4927/082 Audiotaped interview by Twanna L. Vann with George Vann, Jr., 1 December 1991.
C-4927/083 Audiotaped interview by Tiffany Yvonne Williams with Isaac A. Taft, 29 November 1991.
C-4927/084 Audiotaped interview by Joann Kelly Ziegler with Ethel Frances Whittington, 2 December 1991.
C-4927/085 Audiotaped interview by Katina Nicole Peacock with Lener Cole Williams, 30 November 1991.
C-4927/086 Audiotaped interview by Shanna Ford with Dorothy White, 30 November 1991.
C-4927/087 Audiotaped interview by Chinita Whitaker with Arthur Wilson, 30 November 1991.
C-4927/088 Audiotaped interview by William Williams with Matlene Williams, 1991.
C-4927/089 Audiotaped interview by Yvette Wills with Edward Wills, 30 November 1991.
C-4927/090 Audiotaped interview by Kirby Ballard with Emmitt Tilley, 4 December 1991. The tape of this interview is broken; no listening copy is available.
C-4927/091 Audiotaped interview by Tarris Xavier Jones with Richard Trice, 5 December 1991.
C-4927/092 Audiotaped interview by William Brown with Anna Walls, 1 December 1991.
C-4927/093 Audiotaped interview by Tracey Spivey-White with Beatrice Brewington-Farmer, 25 March 1991.
C-4927/094 Audiotaped interview by Brian Scott Chappell with John W. Chappell, 2 April 1991.
C-4927/095 Audiotaped interview by Melanie H. Brown with Calvin L. Brown, Sr., 31 March 1991.
C-4927/096 Audiotaped interview by Tonya P. Nolon with Mr. And Mrs. Cassie Bennett [Ethel], 9 March 1991.
C-4927/097 Audiotaped interview by Emmanuel Ngeve with Shirley Craven, 2 April 1991.
C-4927/098 Audiotaped interview by Jocelyn Bullock Thornton with James Bullock, 24 March 1991.
C-4927/099 Audiotaped interview by H. Christine Bradley with Helen Mae Swepson Bradley, 22 March 1991.
C-4927/100 Audiotaped interview by Rodney Hopkins with Alma Hopkins, 6 March 1991.
C-4927/101 Audiotaped interview by Memoree Wilson with Margaret Harrington, 1991.
C-4927/102 Audiotaped interview by Tonya R. Bennett with Sadie Jeter, 4 April 1991.
C-4927/103 Audiotaped interview by Shalonda Hicks with Josephine Hicks, 29 March 1991.
C-4927/104 Audiotaped interview by Shannon D. McNeill with Daniel W. McNeill, 30 March 1991.
C-4927/105 Audiotaped interview by Louise Walker with Ruth Maddox Wilkerson, 13 March 1991.
C-4927/106 Audiotaped interview by Chonita Copeland with Fred Lee, 1991.
C-4927/107 Audiotaped interview by Nathaniel E. Lindsey with Sophonia Kelly Speed, 4 April 1991.
C-4927/108 Audiotaped interview by Todd Michael Wall with John McDowell, 6 March 1991.
C-4927/109 Audiotaped interview by Patricia Ann House with Mary Little, 4 April 1991.
C-4927/110 Audiotaped interview by David Hester with Alice Revels, 1 April 1991.
C-4927/111 Audiotaped interview by Michelle D. Arnold with Malinda Amanda Sherrod, 2 April 1991.
C-4927/112 Audiotaped interview by Trina Satterwhite with Rossetta C. Amis, 14 October 1991.
C-4927/113 Audiotaped interview by Tim(?) Smith with Charles C. Burns.
C-4927/114 Audiotaped interview by Monica B. Perry with Elizabeth Ruth Begle Cobbs, 30 November 1991.
C-4927/115 Audiotaped interview by Tony Terrell Sawyer with William Cornigan, 4 December 1991.
C-4927/116 Audiotaped interview by Contina Clark with Essie Lee Rhodes Clark, 30 November 1991.
C-4927/117 Audiotaped interview by Jacqueline Denise Murphy with Eula Carr, 1 December 1991.
C-4927/118 Audiotaped interview by Derric B. Brown with Virgina W. Brown, 6 December 1991.
C-4927/119 Audiotaped interview by Tania Butler with Joseph Roscoe Butler, 27 November 1991.
C-4927/120 Audiotaped interview by Candace Y. Cabey with Flora Bowens, 1 December 1991.
C-4927/121 Audiotaped interview by Eric Jerome Oates with Joseph J. Gordan, 31 November 1991.
C-4927/122 Audiotaped interview by Stacy Anne Reid with Eugene Eves, 6 December 1991.
C-4927/123 Audiotaped interview by Eddie Greene with Hattie C. Greene, 29 November 1991.
C-4927/124 Audiotaped interview by Terryl Simpson with Beverly Ann Smith Evans, 2 December 1991.
C-4927/125 Audiotaped interview by Jacquette Danielle Britto with Rebecca Flowers, 30 November 1991.
C-4927/126 Audiotaped interview by Valeri Denise Taylor with Servater Evans, 30 November 1991.
C-4927/127 Audiotaped interview by Vickie M. Porter with Mary Ervin, 6 December 1991.
C-4927/128 Audiotaped interview by Stacey Etheridge with St. Joseph Etheridge, 29 November 1991. The tape of this interview is broken; no listening copy is available.
C-4927/129 Audiotaped interview by Keith Alexander Ragland with Mary Battle Harris, 30 November 1991.
C-4927/130 Audiotaped interview by Kandace Janel Wright with Sallie B. Hampton, 1 December 1991.
C-4927/131 Audiotaped interview by Evangela Booker with Mr. and Mrs. Charlie Hill [Annie Mae] and Shirley Booker, 1 December 1991.
C-4927/132 Audiotaped interview by Pamela Harris with Rander H. Harris, 27 November 1991.
C-4927/133 Audiotaped interview by Salise M. Haith with Beverly Haith, 1 December 1991.
C-4927/134 Audiotaped interview by Alexis Katrina Brown with Beverly Jean Jones, 2 December 1991.
C-4927/135 Audiotaped interview by Phyllis Thompson with Betty Kelly, 3 December 1991.
C-4927/136 Audiotaped interview by Tonia Ray Hinton with Joseph L. Jones, 29 November 1991.
C-4927/137 Audiotaped interview by Deidre Jones with Elizabeth Jones, 30 November 1991.
C-4927/138 Audiotaped interview by Gary L. Johnson with Gloria E. Johnson, 6 December 1991.
C-4927/139 Audiotaped interview by Tarsha S. Barnes with Eula Mae Jenkins, 28 November 1991.
C-4927/140 Audiotaped interview by Colinda Katrice Howard with Wiallian Howard Gatewood, 3 April 1991.
C-4927/141 Audiotaped interview by Tyson King-Meadows with Anne Delores King, 29 November 1991.
C-4927/142 Audiotaped interview by Tyronne Johnson with Napoleon Jackson, 29 November 1991.
C-4927/143 Audiotaped interview by Eathan C. Johnson with Melvin R. Johnson, 29 November 1991.
C-4927/144 Audiotaped interview by Kimberly Washington with Maggie Washburn, 1991.
C-4927/145 Audiotaped interview by Vancer C. Meaders with Vancer Allen Meaders, 6 December 1991.
C-4927/146 Audiotaped interview by Eric Jerome Williams with EDD Dudley Monk, 30 November 1991.
C-4927/147 Audiotaped interview by Robbin Camille Lyon with Lucille H. Lyon, 5 December 1991.
C-4927/148 Audiotaped interview by Erica R. Carson with Lena Leach, 30 November 1991.
C-4927/149 Audiotaped interview by Victoria N. Pearson with Calvin Lee Pearson, 29 November 1991.
C-4927/150 Audiotaped interview by Erskine Shoulars with Nathaniel Manley, 1991.
C-4927/151 Audiotaped interview by Keith Patterson with Patsy Wade, 6 December 1991.
C-4927/152 Audiotaped interview by Colina Katrice Howard with Lorese J. Knight, October 1991.
C-4927/153 Audiotaped interview by Herbert Vanzell Woodard with Shirley S. Woodard, 1991.
C-4927/154 Audiotaped interview by Renane L. Simmons with Robert L. Smith, 1 December 1991.
C-4927/155 Audiotaped interview by Phillip L. Garrett with Mena T. Sellars, 5 December 1991.
C-4927/156 Audiotaped interview by Pamela Irene Woodbury with Shirley Woodbury, 30 November 1991.
C-4927/157 Audiotaped interview by Pamela Crumbley with Idell Randall, 6 December 1991.
C-4927/158 Audiotaped interview by Keith Spencer with Myrtle Weeks, 6 December 1991.
C-4927/159 Audiotaped interview by Charlene D. Coles with Randolph T. Spicer, 12 November 1991.
C-4927/160 Audiotaped interview by Mellinee Simmons with Janie Ernestine Robinson, 7 November 1991.
C-4927/161 Audiotaped interview by Steven M. Williams with Charles Williams, Sr., 5 December 1991.
C-4927/162 Audiotaped interview by Danielle Andrea Kimber with Lucy Scott, 28 November 1991.
C-4927/163 Audiotaped interview by Dana Andrea Whitt with Elvor L. Whitt and Samuel L. Whitt, 5 December 1990.
C-4927/164 Audiotaped interview by Charles Dingle with Elroy Lewis, 28 March 1991.
C-4927/165 Audiotaped interview by Patti Thompson with Anita M. Thompson, 3 April 1991.
C-4927/166 Audiotaped interview by Staris O’Nita Best with Dazie S. Robertson, 3 April 1991.
C-4927/167 Audiotaped interview by Lance R. Albright with Linda P. Albright, 13 March 1992.
C-4927/168 Audiotaped interview by Rodney Ellis with Willis E. Baird, 1992.
C-4927/169 Audiotaped interview by Cynthia S. Poe with Harriett M. Alston, 1992.
C-4927/170 Audiotaped interview by Erica L. Jessie with Agin Alshakir, 1992.
C-4927/171 Audiotaped interview by Dwayne K. Pendergrass with Roberta Ballard, 1992.
C-4927/172 Audiotaped interview by Sonya Bartell with Sandra C. Bartell, 1992.
C-4927/173 Audiotaped interview by Maureen L. Bell with Rosa B. Bell, 1992.
C-4927/174 Audiotaped interview by KaSandra Maria Bryant with Mary Belle Beaufort, 1992.
C-4927/175 Audiotaped interview by E’lise Romaine Keyes with Walter Bell, Sr., 28 March 1992.
C-4927/176 Audiotaped interview by Keith A. Ragland with Maria Basket Blackwell, 1992.
C-4927/177 Audiotaped interview by Tracy Blue with Roseanna Blake, 7 April 1992.
C-4927/178 Audiotaped interview by Sonja Laney with Quessie D. Brown, 1992.
C-4927/179 Audiotaped interview by Veronica M. Bryant with Mr. and Mrs. William S. Bryant, 1992.
C-4927/180 Audiotaped interview by Deidre Jones with Carol Broadnax, 14 March 1992.
C-4927/181 Audiotaped interview by Darren Brown with Susie Brown, 1992.
C-4927/182 Audiotaped interview by Aaron Speller with Eli Brown, 4 April 1992.
C-4927/182 Audiotaped interview by Aaron Speller with Mykal Hicks, 4 April 1992.
C-4927/183 Audiotaped interview by Michelle L. Dalton with Joyce Ann Bowman and Sible Farrior Peterson, 1992.
C-4927/184 Audiotaped interview by Angela Braswell with Sam Bryant, 1992.
C-4927/185 Audiotaped interview by Tammy R. Cherry with Letha Mae Cherry, 15 March 1992. The tape of this interview is broken; no listening copy is available.
C-4927/186 Audiotaped interview by Nancy Clyburn with Betty Clyburn, 14 March 1992.
C-4927/187 Audiotaped interview by James A. Campbell with Joyce W. Campbell, 1992.
C-4927/188 Audiotaped interview by John E., Chandler, Jr., with John E. Chandler, Sr., 1992.
C-4927/189 Audiotaped interview by Dena Moss with Charles Clinton, 1992.
C-4927/190 Audiotaped interview by Wanda Nichols with Raleigh C. Cherry, 28 March 1992.
C-4927/191 Audiotaped interview by Donitta M. Gillespie with Glendora Clark, 1992.
C-4927/192 Audiotaped interview by Lisa A. Clark with Mary F. Clark, 1992.
C-4927/193 Audiotaped interview by Tyese Rechell Cameron with Lena Cuffie, 14 March 1992.
C-4927/194 Audiotaped interview by Brent T. Brandon with Donnie Cox, 1992.
C-4927/195 Audiotaped interview by Craig L. Crutchfield with Shelby Jean Crutchfield, 2 April 1992.
C-4927/196 Audiotaped interview by Patrice S. Banks with Vivan S. Cooper, 1992.
C-4927/197 Audiotaped interview by Veronica Brimmer with James Connaway, 29 March 1992.
C-4927/198 Audiotaped interview by Donald Spicer with Rice Deloatche, 1992. The tape of this interview is broken; no listening copy is available.
C-4927/199 Audiotaped interview by Monica Leigh Chase with Jo Ann Davis, 12 March 1992.
C-4927/200 Audiotaped interview by Junetta Harrell with Leroy Davis, 1992.
C-4927/201 Audiotaped interview by Ymani Satterwhite with Elizabeth S. Deloatche, 1992.
C-4927/202 Audiotaped interview by Dicie V. Latham with Sue Davis, 8 April 1992.
C-4927/203 Audiotaped interview by Beatrice Darden with Percy L. Darden, 1992.
C-4927/204 Audiotaped interview by Eric J. Williams with Eugene L. Dixon, 13 April 1992.
C-4927/205 Audiotaped interview by Joy A. Stevenson with Courtney Eisbey, 1992.
C-4927/206 Audiotaped interview by Patricia A. Mathis with Nettie Miller Dobson, 4 April 1992.
C-4927/207 Audiotaped interview by Olivia D. Duff with Alice H. Duff, 16 March 1992.
C-4927/208 Audiotaped interview by Kendra Edwards with Barbara Quince Everett, 3 April 1992.
C-4927/209 Audiotaped interview by Sterling T. Edwards with Robert Glen Edwards, 6 April 1992.
C-4927/210 Audiotaped interview by Sonya Squires with Gene Squires, 25 November 1991.
C-4927/211 Audiotaped interview by Lekeisha King with Mary B. Faison, 10 March 1992.
C-4927/212 Audiotaped interview by Katrina L. Fox with Doris T. Fox, 1992.
C-4927/213 Audiotaped interview by Kifu Kamau Faruq with Muata Faruq Farrow, 1992.
C-4927/214 Audiotaped interview by Wilbert Bryant, Jr. with George Ewings.
C-4927/215 Audiotaped interview by Connie Ellis with Charles B. Robinson, Jr., 20 April 1992.
C-4927/216 Audiotaped interview by Enes Harper with Reginald Harper, 14 March 1992.
C-4927/217 Audiotaped interview by Tymeka Y. Whiteside with Barbra Gordan-Payne, 1992.
C-4927/218 Audiotaped interview by T. (Nicki) Berry with Johnnie D. Hargrove, 1992.
C-4927/219 Audiotaped interview by Trina Beatty with Levi Hackney, 1992.
C-4927/220 Audiotaped interview by Stacy Anne Reid with Louis Gilmore, 1992.
C-4927/221 Audiotaped interview by Rodney Lee Galloway with Ethen Ann Green, 1 April 1992.
C-4927/222 Audiotaped interview by Jody Grandy with Doris Grandy, 10 April 1992.
C-4927/223 Audiotaped interview by Diedra Highsmith with Barbara Ann Highsmith, 5 April 1992.
C-4927/224 Audiotaped interview by Heather Howell with Rubye R. Hudson, 1992.
C-4927/225 Audiotaped interview by Marcos Hatten with Barbara Hatten, 1992.
C-4927/226 Audiotaped interview by Jerry Hayden with Shirley Gale Hayden, 1992.
C-4927/227 Audiotaped interview by Douglas Melton with Pete Holman, 1992.
C-4927/228 Audiotaped interview by Miriam M. Morgan with Pearlie M. Herndon, 21 March 1992.
C-4927/229 Audiotaped interview by Brian Williams with Eleanor Harrington-Auston, 5 April 1992.
C-4927/230 Audiotaped interview by Kesha Harris with Alberta Harris, 1992.
C-4927/231 Audiotaped interview by Candace R. Houston with Donald T. Houston, 1992.
C-4927/232 Audiotaped interview by Whitney Rich with Marcus Ingram, 1992.
C-4927/233 Audiotaped interview by Malika Hunte with Stephen Fortune, 1992.
C-4927/234 Audiotaped interview by Fred Martin Shankle, Jr., with Faye Kincaid, 1992.
C-4927/235 Audiotaped interview by Kwame T. Lawson with Hester B. Jones, 1992.
C-4927/236 Audiotaped interview by David E. Jordan with Martha Jordan, 1992.
C-4927/237 Audiotaped interview by Carla D. Jefferson with Eloise Jefferson, 7 April 1992.
C-4927/238 Audiotaped interview by E. Richele James with Richard D. James, Jr., 1992.
C-4927/239 Audiotaped interview by Dwayne Young with Janice Judge, 1992.
C-4927/240 Audiotaped interview by Gerry Jones with R. B. Jones, 8 April 1992.
C-4927/241 Audiotaped interview by Keisha Jones with Isolene Jones, 1992.
C-4927/242 Audiotaped interview by Lori L. King with Guinevere L. King, 1992.
C-4927/243 Audiotaped interview by Leslie Michand Jones with Lea Dora Daye, 30 March 1991.
C-4927/244 Audiotaped interview by Kalvin Sparrow with Janice James, 1992.
C-4927/245 Audiotaped interview by Isaiah Williams III with Clarence Jordan, Sr., 1992.
C-4927/246 Audiotaped interview by Norman Lovick, Jr., with Norman Lovick, Sr., 1992.
C-4927/247 Audiotaped interview by Cerise J. Little with Sally Mae Little, 1992.
C-4927/248 Audiotaped interview by Melissa Y. Tillery with Bernice Lucas, 4 April 1992.
C-4927/249 Audiotaped interview by Tracy L. Pierce with Davesene W. Lawson, 1992.
C-4927/250 Audiotaped interview by Jerome M. Leathers with Carolyn H. Leathers, 1992.
C-4927/251 Audiotaped interview by Vickie Porter with Jean Leathers, 5 April 1992.
C-4927/252 Audiotaped interview by Raquel Janice Spence with Jimmie Leonard, 1992.
C-4927/253 Audiotaped interview by Carla A. Harris with Mary Henery Mathews, 1992.
C-4927/254 Audiotaped interview by Natasha D. Pitts with Annie McKinnon, 1992.
C-4927/255 Audiotaped interview by Ramone Givens with Ernest D. Mason, 1992.
C-4927/256 Audiotaped interview by Naima J. Smith with Robert Louis McAdams, 1992.
C-4927/257 Audiotaped interview by Andrea McCollum with Larry and Sandra McCollum, 1992.
C-4927/258 Audiotaped interview by Anissa D. Johnson with Juanita B. Massenburg, 6 April 1992.
C-4927/259 Audiotaped interview by Sherri Miles with Ester Elliot McKinsey, 1992.
C-4927/260 Audiotaped interview by Michael A. McDowell with Michael Murray, 1992.
C-4927/261 Audiotaped interview by Marlon Brim with Alonzo Morrow, Sr., 1992.
C-4927/262 Audiotaped interview by Equence McArthur with Dollie M. Parker, 1992.
C-4927/263 Audiotaped interview by Tracy W. Young with Jermaine Nicholason and Bob Rogers, 1992.
C-4927/264 Audiotaped interview by LaTonya Michelle Everett with Clara Owens, 1992.
C-4927/265 Audiotaped interview by Artimus Neal with Artelia Neal, 1992.
C-4927/266 Audiotaped interview by Rosalind Owens with Alma Nabinett, 1992.
C-4927/267 Audiotaped interview by Victoria N. Pearson with Merrill C. Pearson, 28 March 1992.
C-4927/268 Audiotaped interview by Patrice R. Raynor with Willie Parker, 1992.
C-4927/269 Audiotaped interview by Johnny Johnson with Aleta and Lloyd Ross, 10 April 1992.
C-4927/270 Audiotaped interview by Angela M. Hill with Thurman Prescott, 1992.
C-4927/271 Audiotaped interview by Kimberly C. Washington, with William R. Russell.
C-4927/272 Audiotaped interview by Vanessa D. Jarrell with Miriam Gwinette Ricks, 1992.
C-4927/273 Audiotaped interview by Angela T. Bailey with Mary Pugh-Bailey, 10 April 1992. The tape of this interview is broken; no listening copy is available.
C-4927/274 Audiotaped interview by Shelby A. Smith with Ernestine J. Smith, 14 March 1992.
C-4927/275 Audiotaped interview by Alexis Brown with Margret Patricia Williams Saunders, 1992.
C-4927/276 Audiotaped interview by Coleen Bannister with Viola J. Simmons, 1992.
C-4927/277 Audiotaped interview by Roblyn Mitchell with Amelia Scott Shepperson, 1992.
C-4927/278 Audiotaped interview by Chavora Jones with Isaac Sims, 1992.
C-4927/279 Audiotaped interview by Veronica L. Snipes with Odessa B. Snipes, 1992.
C-4927/280 Audiotaped interview by Bridget Devonnia Perry with Mary E. Seward, 1992.
C-4927/281 Audiotaped interview by Michelle E. Brooks with Ollie Samuels, 14 March 1992.
C-4927/282 Audiotaped interview by Keyshia Small with Dorothy Small, 7 April 1992.
C-4927/283 Audiotaped interview by Angelia T. Ball with Mable Willie Sumrall, 1992.
C-4927/284 Audiotaped interview by Shelton B. Slade with Dorothy Thompson, 1992.
C-4927/285 Audiotaped interview by Sheryl Bailey with Virginia Thomas, 1992.
C-4927/286 Audiotaped interview by Alisha Brown with Bobby Spruill, 11 April 1992.
C-4927/287 Audiotaped interview by Charlette Tuggle with Carl Tuggle, 10 March 1992.
C-4927/288 Audiotaped interview by Vanita Morrison with Monie Swepson, 1992.
C-4927/289 Audiotaped interview by Dana A. Whitt with Lottie Whitt Sydnor, 1992.
C-4927/290 Audiotaped interview by Crystal O. Spears with Ardella B. Spears, 1992.
C-4927/291 Audiotaped interview by Juanda L. Scotland with Alice D. Torian, 25 March 1992.
C-4927/292 Audiotaped interview by Murray McKeithan with John Staten, 1992.
C-4927/293 Audiotaped interview by Gary Hughes with Melvin Vass, 1992.
C-4927/294 Audiotaped interview by Frederick E. Barnes with Charles P. Watson, 1992.
C-4927/295 Audiotaped interview by Michelle Walker with Madeline Walker, 1992.
C-4927/296 Audiotaped interview by Marie Melanie Brown with Nathaniel Walker, 3 April 1992.
C-4927/297 Audiotaped interview by Janine Rozier with Connia Henry Watson, Jr., 29 March 1992.
C-4927/298 Audiotaped interview by Marcus Watkins with Lula Mae Watkins, 1992.
C-4927/299 Audiotaped interview by Brian Ganges with Norfley Williams and Dan Harris, 1992.
C-4927/300 Audiotaped interview by Michele R. McCoy with James Edward Yancey, Jr., 1992.
C-4927/301 Audiotaped interview by Tarsha S. Barnes with Mary H. Willis, 1992.
C-4927/302 Audiotaped interview by Shavis D. Cole with Janet M. Young, 1992.
C-4927/303 Audiotaped interview by Carla Bryant with Addie Wiggins, 4 April 1992.
C-4927/304 Audiotaped interview by Michelle Ross with Grace and Raymond Williams, 1992.
C-4927/305 Audiotaped interview by Jason D. Evans with Levester White, 1992.
C-4927/306 Audiotaped interview by Yolanda Williams with Earlden F. Williams, 11 April 1992.
C-4927/307 Audiotaped interview by Beverly C. Williamson with Mary P. Williamson, 1992.
C-4927/308 Audiotaped interview by Marlan L. Copeland with Elwood Yellock, 1992.
C-4927/309 Audiotaped interview by Tracie Worsley with Jeraldine Worsley, 12 April 1992.
C-4927/310 Audiotaped interview by Frazier Ben Beatty with Thorny T. Birdsong Barnes.
C-4927/311 Audiotaped interview by Carlotta Tuggle with Elizabeth Jane Tuggle, 10 March 1992.
C-4927/312 Audiotaped interview by Tyese Rechell Cameron with Monnie Whitehurst, 30 November 1991.
C-4927/313 Audiotaped interview by Pelitha Armstrong with Maurice Hinton, 22 July 1976.
C-4927/314 Audiotaped interview by Shalon Bobbitt with Edgar Daye, 4 December 1991.
C-4927/315 Audiotaped interview by Dwayne Kennedy with Mr. Brown.
C-4927/316 Audiotaped interview by Monty Walker with Lawrence Walker.
C-4927/317 Audiotaped interview by Thomas Strickland with Melvin Riggs.
C-4927/318 Audiotaped interview by Lisa Jones with Peter Randolph Gaines.
C-4927/319 Audiotaped interview by Aleem El-Amin with Beverly El-Amin, 1991.
C-4927/320 Audiotaped interview by Brent Brandon with Miss. Reynolds.
C-4927/321 Audiotaped interview by Kim Council with John Richard(?) Rosser, 1991.
C-4927/322 Audiotaped interview by Fronza Edward Kirkpatrick with Mabel Brown and Thomas Covington, 26 March 1991.
C-4927/323 Audiotaped interview by Sheile Harrell with Mr. and Mrs. Harrell.
C-4927/324 Audiotaped interview by Jason Evans with Alvin Curry Decker, 1991.
C-4927/325 Audiotaped interview by Omega Smith with Silas Hunt.
C-4927/326 Audiotaped interview by Kathie McLean with James C. McLean, 1 December 1991.
C-4927/327 Audiotaped interview by Lynetta Parker with Beulah H. Parker, 30 October 1991.
C-4927/328 Audiotaped interview by Valerie Perkins with Perry Perkins.
C-4927/329 Audiotaped interview by Tammorah DeVane and David Jones with Senesta Hankins.
C-4927/330 Audiotaped interview by Marc Clarke with Dr. Lovett.
C-4927/331 Audiotaped interview by Freddie Sturdivant with unidentified woman, 30 November 1991.
Web address: http://www.lib.unc.edu/mss/inv/e/Earlie_E.Thorpe_Oral_History_Collection.html


Title: Faith stories : interviews, writing, and artwork from young members of Durham’s faith communities.
Author: Duke University. Center for Documentary Studies.
Publisher: [Durham, N.C. : Duke University Center for Documentary Studies, 1998]
Location: UNC – Chapel Hill Libraries: North Carolina Collection
Call Number: Cp971.32 D96f
Format: book
Subjects:
Durham (N.C.)–Religion.
Durham (N.C.)–Social life and customs.
Religious life.


Title: First-person America
Author: edited and with an introd. by Ann Banks.
Banks, Ann.
Federal Writers’ Project.
Publisher: New York : Knopf : distributed by Random House, 1980.
Location: UNC – Chapel Hill Libraries: Davis Library
Call Number: E169 .F56
Location 2: Duke University: Perkins/Bostock Library : E169 .F56 1980 c.1
Format: Book
Subjects:
Oral history.
United States–Social life and customs–1918-1945.
United States–Social life and customs–1865-1918.
United States–Biography.
Durham (N.C.)–Social life and customs.


Title: Foundation history: North Carolina Fund, 1995-1996 (Series O).
Author:
Southern Oral History Program.
Korstad, Robert Rodgers.
Leloudis, James L.
Location: UNC – Chapel Hill Libraries: Archival Materials (Wilson Library) Southern Historical Collection
Call Number: 4007.O
Format: Archival Materials
Description:
Interviews conducted as part of a project on race, poverty, and the North Carolina Fund (NCF) and in relation to the “No Easy Walk” conference, held in Durham, N.C., in 1996. The NCF, established in 1963, was a forerunner of Lyndon Johnson’s War on Poverty. It not only established and supported community action agencies that still operate today, but it operated manpower development programs, conducted important research on poverty, trained community organizers, and sent racially integrated teams of student volunteers into rural communities to help local people fight poverty and racism. The project, coordinated by James Leloudis of the UNC-Chapel Hill history department and Robert Korstad of the Terry Sanford Institute of Public Policy at Duke University, interviewed former student volunteers, foundation officers, federal and state policy makers, and residents of the communities touched by the NCF’s work to assess the significance of the Fund’s position as an intermediary between local organizations and communities, on one hand, and the federal government and private philanthropy on the other, and ask whether the Fund’s experience might inform creative policy-making today. The conference also related to the NCF’s work.
Subjects:
Atwater, Ann.
Barnes, Billy E.
Clayton, Eva M.
Community development–North Carolina–History–20th century.
Community leadership–North Carolina–History–20th century.
Ehle, John, 1925-
Fuller, Howard, 1941-
Kahn, Si.
Lambeth, Thomas W.
Manpower policy–North Carolina–History–20th century.
North Carolina Fund.
North Carolina–Economic conditions.
North Carolina–Race relations.
North Carolina–Rural conditions.
North Carolina–Social conditions.
Poverty–North Carolina–History–20th century.
Sanford, Terry, 1917-1998.
Seymour, Robert E.–(Robert Edward), 1925-
Volunteer workers in community development–North Carolina–History–20th century.
Individual Names in Finding Aid: Folder O-i
Invitation letter, conference program, and syllabus
Interview O-0001 – Addo, Linda Powell: North Carolina Volunteer, 1964
Interview O-0002 – Amey, Dorothy: North Carolina Volunteer, 1964, Harnett County
Interview O-0003, O-0004 – Atwater, Ann: Community organizer, Durham, N.C.
Interview O-0005 – Barnes, Billy E.: Photographer; Director of Public Information, North Carolina Fund; See also O-37, O-38
Interview O-0006 – Berkeley, Mildred: Volunteer, Interfaith Council for Social Service and founding member of BAAG (Black Alcoholism Awareness Group), Chapel Hill, N.C.
Interview O-0007 – Bishop, Brenda Kay Johnson: North Carolina Volunteer, 1965
Interview O-0008 – Clayton, Joyce: Director of Upward Bound, UNC-Chapel Hill; work-study student, North Carolina Fund and Operation Breakthrough, 1960s
Interview O-0009 – Coble, Emily Ruth: North Carolina Volunteer, 1964
Interview O-0010 – Cogswell, Arthur R.: Architect
Interview O-0011 – Dixon, Naomi Ferne Thorpe (*): North Carolina Volunteer, 1965
Interview O-0012 – Ehle, John: Special assistant to Governor Terry Sanford
Interview O-0013 – Fields, Johnette Ingold: North Carolina Volunteer, 1965
Interview O-0014 – Fuller, Howard: Marquette University professor; former antipoverty activist, Durham, N.C.
Interview O-0015 – Garrett, Nathan: Deputy director, North Carolina Fund
Interview O-0016 – Hughes, I. Harding: Durham city manager, 1963-1977
Interview O-0017 – Justice, John: Film writer, North Carolina Fund
Interview O-0018 – Lail, Bill: Director, FRC, Siler City, N.C.
Interview O-0019 – Lambeth, Thomas W.: Director, Z. Smith Reynolds Foundations
Interview O-0020 – McKinney, Lois M.: Mountain craftsperson who participates in the Mt. Mitchell Crafts Fair annually and learned skills in WAMY’s Mountain Handicrafts Program in the 1960s
Interview O-0021 – Miller, Hollis: North Carolina Volunteer, 1965
Interview O-0022 – Moretz, H. C.: Former executive director of WAMY Community Action Agency
Interview O-0023 – Norwood, Bernice
Interview O-0024 – Powell, Susie R.: North Carolina Volunteer
Interview O-0025 – Sasson, Diane: North Carolina Volunteer, 1965
Interview O-0026 – Seymour, Robert: Pastor emeritus of Binkley Baptist Church and first president of the Interfaith Council for Social Service, Chapel Hill, N.C.
Interview O-0027 – Shelburne, Katherine P. (*): North Carolina Volunteer, 1964
Interview O-0028 – Smith, Walter L.: Director, Low Income Housing Development Corporation
Interview O-0029 – Whitson, Betty: Case manager for WAMY Community Action, Inc., Yancey County Office
Interview O-0030 – Wilson, Lonnie: Community organizer, volunteer and then employee at Operation Breakthrough, Durham, N.C.
Interview O-0031 – Camm, S. Esther Tyler: North Carolina Volunteer, 1965
Interview O-0032 – Drake, Annie Rose: North Carolina Volunteer, 1965
Interview O-0033 – Clayton, Eva M.: Keynote address, 13 December 1996
Interview O-0034 – Fuller, Howard: Closing speech, 14 December 1996
Interview O-0035 – Kahn, Si: “Music and Change,” 13 December 1996
Interview O-0036 – Sanford, Terry: Storytelling session, 13 December 1996
Interview O-0037, O-0038 – Barnes, Billy E.: Photographer; Director of Public Information, North Carolina Fund; See also O-5


DURHAM COUNTY LIBRARY OWNS THIS ITEM:

Title: From Pine Street to Watts Street : an oral history of the Jews of Durham, North Carolina
Author:
Robin Gruber.
Gruber, Robin.
Duke University. Dept. of History.
Publisher: 1986
Location: Duke University Archives
Call Number: 904 D877, 1986-GR c.1
Format: Manuscript
Subjects:
Jews–North Carolina–Durham–History.
African Americans–North Carolina–Durham–Relations with Jews.
Individual Names in Finding Aid


Title: Glenn Hinson collection, 1978-1979 [manuscript].
Author:
Hinson, Glenn.
Burt, Thomas, 1900-1987.
Harris, Irving Paca.
Smith, James Shout.
Location: UNC – Chapel Hill Libraries: Archival Materials (Wilson Library) Southern Folklife Collection
Call Number: FT2842- 2846
Format: 5 sound recordings
Description: Recordings of Thomas Burt, African American country blues guitarist, of Durham, Durham County, N.C., playing country blues and ragtime on the guitar, both songs and instrumentals. Also included are recordings of James (“Shout”) Smith, African American hambone player, and Irving (“Paca”) Harris, African American spoons player, both of Durham, N.C., playing hambone rhythms and spoons, respectively. Smith and Harris also tell jokes and rhymes.
Subjects:
African American wit and humor.
African Americans–North Carolina–Music.
Blues (Music)–North Carolina.
Bones (Musical instrument)
Burt, Thomas, 1900-1987.
Durham County (N.C.)–Songs and music.
Folk music–North Carolina.
Folk poetry, American–North Carolina.
Guitar music (Blues)
Guitar music (Ragtime)
Harris, Irving Paca.
North Carolina–Songs and music.
Percussion music.
Ragtime music–North Carolina.
Smith, James Shout.
Songs, English–North Carolina.
Individual Names in Finding Aid:
Hinson, Glenn.
Burt, Thomas, 1900-1987.
Harris, Irving Paca.
Smith, James Shout.
Persons from Durham:
Thomas Burt
Irving “Paca” Harris
James “Shout” Smith


Title: Glenn Hinson Folklife section collection, 1980 June 13 [manuscript].
Author:
Hinson, Glenn.
Markham, Pigmeat.
Location: UNC – Chapel Hill Libraries: Archival Materials (Wilson Library) Southern Folklife Collection
Call Number: PM358-361
Format: Archival Materials, 4 audio recordings
Description: Extensive oral history of Dewey “Pigmeat” Markham (1904-1981) of Bronx, N.Y., originally of Durham N.C. Markham was an African American medicine show and vaudeville performer, singer, dancer, and comedian. The oral history focuses on his career, his early work in medicine shows and in carnivals, and his later work on Broadway and on radio and television.
Subjects:
African American entertainers–Interviews.
African Americans in radio broadcasting.
African Americans in television broadcasting.
Entertainers–United States–Interviews.
Markham, Pigmeat.
Medicine shows.
Oral history.


Title: The Hayti spectrum: Documenting negro life of the 1920s, ’30s, and ’40s in Durham, N.C., 2000s (Series V).
Author: Southern Oral History Program.
Location: UNC – Chapel Hill Libraries: Archival Materials (Wilson Library) Southern Historical Collection
Call Number: 4007.V
Format: Archival Materials, tapes, transcripts
Description: The Hayti Spectrum oral history project, conducted by interviewer Brenda L. Williams, explores life in the Hayti Community of Durham, N.C., from the 1920s to the 1960s. Also included are by 37 folders of introductory materials compiled by the interviewer. These materials include newspaper clippings, church and funeral programs, photographs, and items related to some of the interviewees in the collection.
Subjects:
African Americans–North Carolina–Durham.
Durham (N.C.)–History.
Durham (N.C.)–Race relations.
Durham (N.C.)–Social life and customs.
Hayti (Durham, N.C.)–History.
Hayti (Durham, N.C.)–Race relations.
Hayti (Durham, N.C.)–Social life and customs.
North Carolina–History.
North Carolina–Race relations.
North Carolina–Social life and customs.
Oral history.
Individual Names in Finding Aid:
Folder V-i – Hayti Memorabilia Inventory
Folder V-ii – Alston, Lathrop (Lath)
Folder V-iii – Baptist Supply Store
Folder V-iv – Bryant, R. Kelly
Folder V-v – Caesar, Shirley
Folder V-vi – Clement, Josephine Dobbs
Folder V-vii – Clubs and Leisure
Folder V-viii – Culture and Traditions
Folder V-vix – Edmonds, Helen G.
Folder V-x – Education
Folder V-xi – Family life
Folder V-xii – Federation of Negro Women
Folder V-xiii – Firemen
Folder V-xiv – First Calvary Baptist Church yearbook
Folder V-xv – Franklin, John Hope
Folder V-xvi – Funeral pamphlets and other funeral materials
Folder V-xvi – Garden Club, Year Round
Folder V-xvii – Garrett, York D., Jr.
Folder V-xix – Hayti Spectrum Flyer
Folder V-xx – Health and Hospitals
Folder V-xxi – Holmes, Althea
Folder V-xxii – Interdenominational Ministerial Alliance of Durham and Vicinity
Folder V-xxiii – Masons
Folder V-xxiv – Mechanics and Farmers Bank
Folder V-xxv – Miscellaneous
Folder V-xxvi – Music (Gospel): lyric sheets and sheet music
Folder V-xxvii – Newspaper clippings (miscellaneous)
Folder V-xxviii – North Carolina Central University
Folder V-xxix – Obituaries
Folder V-xxx -“Other Faces and Places Outside Durham”
Folder V-xxxi – Parker-White Rock
Folder V-xxxii – Photocopies of photographs (miscellaneous)
Folder V-xxxiii – Photographs
Folder V-xxxiv – Political Life
Folder V-xxxv – Rivera, Alex
Folder V-xxxvi – Tobacco and other business materials
Folder V-xxxvi – Union Baptist Church
Interview V-0001 – Allison, Geneva B.
Interview V-0002 – Alston, Christine
Interview V-0003 – Austin, Lodius and Austin, DeNina
Interview V-0004 -Bagley, Montez Bates
Interview V-0005 – Baines, Mary and Baines, Lucille
Interview V-0006 – Barnes, Fannie M.
Interview V-0007 – Blunt, Russell E.
Interview V-0008 – Boxley, Pauline R.
Interview V-0009 – Bryant, R. Kelly
Interview V-0010 – Burnett, Frank
Interview V-0011 – Carrington, J.W.
Interview V-0012 – Clement, Josephine Dobbs
Interview V-0013 – Coward, Adolph M.
Interview V-0014 – Dillard, Geneva L.
Interview V-0015 – Dillard, Samuel
Interview V-0016 – Edwards, Lillie
Interview V-0017 – Frazier, L.B.
Interview V-0018 – Frazier, Sarah B.
Interview V-0019 – Hammond, Kenneth Ray
Interview V-0020 – Haskins, Willie E.
Interview V-0021 – Holloway, Gladys P. and Holloway, Travis
Interview V-0022 – Holmes, Althea M.
Interview V-0023 – Lloyd, Clyde
Interview V-0024 – McCullough, Roxie W.
Interview V-0025 – Michaux, Manley
Interview V-0026 – Page, Benjamin
Interview V-0027 – Parker, Lydia Lavinia
Interview V-0028 – Peay, Lorenzo
Interview V-0029 – Plummer, Artis
Interview V-0030 – Pratt, Eva M.
Interview V-0031 – Ray, Loris Shaw
Interview V-0032 – Reaves, Ruth G.
Interview V-0033 – Rivera, Alex M.
Interview V-0034 – Sampson, Daniel George
Interview V-0035 – Schooler, James M.
Interview V-0036 – Smith, Mary Hester
Interview V-0037 – Spaulding, Adeline R.
Interview V-0038 – Spaulding, Booker B.
Interview V-0039 – Speight, Theodore
Interview V-0040 – Turner, Billie
Interview V-0041 – Watts, Constance M.
Interview V-0042 – Wheeler, Selena
Interview V-0043 – White, Nathaniel B., Sr.
Interview V-0044 – Williams, Hattie B.
Interview V-0045 – Yarborough, Charles
Interview V-0046 – Bennett, Frank
Web address: http://www.lib.unc.edu/mss/inv/s/Southern_Oral_History_Program_Collection.html : http://search.trln.org/search?id=UNCb4904326


Title: In search of prosperity : oral histories of Black migrants from sharecropping to wage labor in tobacco factories in Durham, 1925-1950
Author:
Jasmine Spring McGhee.
McGhee, Jasmine Spring.
Publisher: 2003
Location: North Carolina Collection, UNC—Chapel Hill
Call Number: C378 UO7 2003 v. 3
Format: Theses and Dissertations
Subjects:
African Americans–North Carolina–Economic conditions–20th century.
Durham (N.C.)–Emigration and immigration–Economic aspects.
Sharecroppers–North Carolina.
Tobacco workers–North Carolina–Durham.
Walls family.
Young family.


DURHAM COUNTY LIBRARY OWNS THIS ITEM:

Title: Juntos con nuestra herencia : interviews, poetry and oral history from Durham’s Latino community
Author: compiled by Durham Latino youth ages 12-15 = Juntos con nuestra herencia : entrevistas, poesias e historias orales de la comunidad latina en Durham / realizado por jovenes latinos en Durham de 12-15 anos.
Publisher: Durham, N.C. : Duke University Center for Documentary Studies, [1999]
Location: North Carolina Collection, UNC—Chapel Hill
Call Number: Cp810.8 J95d
Format: Book
Description: 55 p. : ill. ; 28 cm.
Subjects:
Youths’ writings, American–North Carolina–Durham.
African American youth–North Carolina–Durham.
Youths’ writings, African American.
Hispanic American youth–North Carolina–Durham.
Youths’ writings, Spanish American.
Durham (N.C.)–Social life and customs.


DURHAM COUNTY LIBRARY OWNS THIS ITEM:

Title: Let’s talk tobacco : tobacco talk community stories, 1998
Author: Duke University. Center for Documentary Studies.
Publisher: [Durham, N.C. : Duke University Center for Documentary Studies, 1998]
Location: North Carolina Collection, UNC—Chapel Hill
Call Number: Cp971.32 D96L
Format: Book
Description: 63 p. : ill. ; 22 cm.
Note: A collection of interviews, biographies, art, poems and creative writing of students who participated in the Community Stories: Tobacco Talk Project.
Subjects:
Tobacco — North Carolina — Durham — History.
Durham (N.C.) — History.
Durham (N.C.) — Social life and customs.
Durham (N.C.) — Social conditions.


DURHAM COUNTY LIBRARY OWNS THIS ITEM:

Title: Life as we see it : writing, photography and oral history from our communities by African American and Latino youth in Durham ages 9 to 14 = Como vemos la vida : narracion, poesia, e historias orales de nuestras comunidades por jovenes Latinos e Afro-Americanos en Durham de edades 9 a 14.
Publisher: Durham, N.C. : Duke University Center for Documentary Studies, 1999.
Location: North Carolina Collection, UNC—Chapel Hill
Call Number: C810.8 L72d
Location 2: Duke University: Perkins/Bostock Library: PS508.Y68 L54 1999
Format: Book
Description: 55 p. : ill. ; 28 cm.
Subjects:
African American youth — North Carolina — Durham.
African American youth’s writings — North Carolina — Durham.
Hispanic American youth — North Carolina — Durham.
Hispanic American youth’s writings — North Carolina — Durham.
Durham (N.C.) — Social life and customs.


DURHAM COUNTY LIBRARY OWNS THIS ITEM:

Title: Listen for change : a look at social activism in Northeast Central Durham : Old Five Points community stories, 1998.
Author: Duke University. Center for Documentary Studies.
Publisher: [Durham, N.C. : Duke University Center for Documentary Studies, 1998]
Location: North Carolina Collection, UNC—Chapel Hill
Call Number: Cp971.32 D96L1
Format: Book
Description: 100 p. : ill. ; 22 cm.
Notes:“A blend of oral histories, visual images, and poetry stressing social change in Old Five Points”–P. 100.
Subjects:
Social action — North Carolina — Durham.
African American neighborhoods — North Carolina — Durham — History.
Durham (N.C.) — History.
Durham (N.C.) — Social life and customs.
Durham (N.C.) — Social conditions.


Title: The Long Civil Rights Movement: The South Since the 1960s: Gender and sexuality, 2007 (Series U.11).
Author: Southern Oral History Program.
Location: UNC – Chapel Hill Libraries: Archival Materials (Wilson Library) Southern Historical Collection
Call Number: 4007.U.11
Format: Archival Materials, tapes, transcripts
Description: This series explores how the South played a critical yet contradictory role in shaping both the women’s movement and the gay liberation movement. Many second-wave feminists and gay rights activists first gained experience as grassroots organizers in the South’s African American freedom movement of the 1960s. The South earned a reputation for its adherence to traditional notions of womanhood and masculinity and for its organized resistance to the Equal Rights Amendment and gay rights initiatives. It was in that southern context that many activists began to extend the goals of freedom and equality to questions of gender and sexuality. This series contains 25 interviews conducted by students and interns under the direction of Dr. Sarah Thuesen during the summer 2006 and spring 2007 semesters at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The students chose a broad range of feminists and gay rights activists as interviewees. Most were residents of the Raleigh-Durham-Chapel Hill area. Interviewees include one of the first women to integrate the United States Military Academy in 1976 and a male professor at the Academy who witnessed that change; two ministers of local churches affiliated with the Metropolitan Community Church, a predominantly gay denomination; several grassroots leaders within the local gay rights movement; participants in the women’s health and reproductive rights movements of the 1970s; former employees of Ladyslipper Music in Durham; Karen Parker, the first female African American to receive an undergraduate degree at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; the co-founders of Mothers Against Jesse in Congress, which organized in the mid-1990s against the homophobic rhetoric of North Carolina Senator Jesse Helms; an advocate for women’s collegiate athletics; activists with the Orange County (N.C.) Women’s Center; members of the Triangle-area Common Woman Chorus; veterans of the Southern Folk Cultural Revival Project, including Alice Gerrard; advocates for women’s involvement in politics, especially through the North Carolina Women’s Political Caucus; local organizers for National Organization for Women; and local participants in the Equal Rights Amendment campaigns of the 1970s.
Subjects:
African American college students–North Carolina–Chapel Hill.
African American college students–North Carolina–History–20th century.
African American women–Civil rights.
African Americans–Civil rights–North Carolina.
African Americans–North Carolina.
Chapel Hill (N.C.)–History.
Chapel Hill (N.C.)–Race relations.
Chapel Hill (N.C.)–Social conditions.
Civil rights movements–North Carolina.
Durham (N.C.)–History.
Durham (N.C.)–Race relations.
Durham (N.C.)–Social conditions.
Equal rights amendments–United States.
Feminism–North Carolina.
Gay activists–North Carolina.
Gay liberation movement–North Carolina.
Gerrard, Alice, 1934-
Helms, Jesse–Views on homosexuality.
Lesbian activists–North Carolina.
Metropolitan Community Church.
Mothers Against Jesse in Congress (Political action committee)
National Organization for Women.
North Carolina Women’s Political Caucus.
North Carolina–Race relations.
North Carolina–Social conditions.
Oral history.
Orange County Women’s Center.
Parker, Karen L.
Raleigh (N.C.)–History.
Raleigh (N.C.)–Race relations.
Raleigh (N.C.)–Social conditions.
Reproductive rights–Women.
Segregation in higher education–North Carolina.
Southern Folk Cultural Revival Project, Inc.
United States Military Academy.
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill–African American students.
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill–History–20th century.
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill–Women students.
Women clergy–North Carolina.
Women college students–North Carolina–Chapel Hill.
Women college students–North Carolina–History–20th century.
Women in community organization.
Women musicians–North Carolina.
Women–Health and hygiene.
Women–North Carolina–Social conditions.
Women–North Carolina–Social life and customs.
Individual Names in Finding Aid:
Interview U-0197 – Abel, Joanne: Founder of Ladyslipper Music; gay rights activist, 3 April 2007
Interview U-0198 – Agnew, Nancy L. and Karen Dold: Founders of the Common Woman Chorus in Durham, N.C.; gay rights activists, 13 March 2007
Interview U-0199 – Allen, Calvin: Gay rights activist, 3 April 2007
Interview U-0200 – Allen, Jan (*): Founder of Lillian’s List; local organizer for the National Organization for Women; gay rights activist, 5 July 2006
Interview U-0217, U-0218, U-0219 – Barney, Elaine: Founding board member of the Orange County Women’s Center; women’s reproductive rights activist, 1 March 2007; 31 May 2007; 21 June 2007
Interview U-0209 – Beasley, Joseph: Vietnam veteran, professor of history and ethics at the United States Military Academy, 18 April 2007
Interview U-0201 – Boone, Belva (*): First African American female pastor at Saint John’s Metropolitan Community Church in Raleigh, N.C., 21 March 2007
Interview U-0202 – Clarke, Patsy: Founder of MAJIC (Mothers Against Jesse in Congress), 19 February 2007
Interview U-0203 – Fisher-Borne, Marcie: Gay rights activist; founder of Safe Zone for LGBT students at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Planned Parenthood outreach coordinator, 19 February 2007
Interview U-0204 – Floyd, Wanda: Founder of Imani Metropolitan Community Church in Durham, N.C.; gay rights activist, 22 February 2007
Interview U-0205 – Gerrard, Alice: Musician and veteran of the Southern Folk Cultural Revival Project, 2 March 2007
Interview U-0206 – Gerstein, Kathy (*): Female cadet at the United States Military Academy at West Point in the 1970s, 5 March 2007
Interview U-0207 – Glasser, Florence: Women’s rights activist; founding member of Women’s Forum and of the North Carolina Women’s Political Caucus, 11 July 2006
Interview U-0208 – Hall, Mary Frances: Advocate for women’s collegiate athletics; director of a summer camp for girls’ leadership training, 17 February 2007
Interview U-0210 – Knudsen, Betty and Beth McAllister: Civil rights and women’s rights activists; members of the League of Women Voters, 25 July 2006
Interview U-0220 – Nickolson, Catherine: Co-founder of Sinister Wisdom, a multicultural lesbian literary and art journal, 9 April 2007
Interview U-0211, U-0212 – Parker, Karen L.: The first African American woman undergraduate student at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 16 April 2007 and 18 February 2007
Interview U-0221 – Rucker, Rhonda: African American musician and veteran of the Southern Folk Cultural Revival Project, 14 April 2007
Interview U-0213 – Rudy, Kathy: Assistant professor of ethics and women’s studies at Duke University in Durham, N.C.; associated with Ladyslipper Music in the 1980s, 5 March 2007
Interview U-0214 – Sved, Margery: Psychiatrist; women’s rights and gay rights activist; founding member of the Durham Women’s Health Cooperative, 8 March 2007
Interview U-0215 – Vaughn, Eloise M.: Co-founder of MAJIC (Mothers Against Jesse in Congress), 30 March 2007
Interview U-0216 – Wells, Darlene: Women’s rights activist; former director of the Women’s Center and the Coalition for Battered Women in Chapel Hill, N.C., 14 March 2007


Title:The Long Civil Rights Movement: The South Since the 1960s: Hillside High School, 2004-2005 (Series U.10).
Author: Southern Oral History Program.
Location: UNC – Chapel Hill Libraries: Archival Materials (Wilson Library) Southern Historical Collection
Call Number: 4007.U.10
Format: Archival Materials, tapes, transcripts
Description: These interviews were conducted by Gerrelyn Chunn Patterson as part of her research for her dissertation, Brown Can’t Close Us Down: The Invincible Pride of Hillside High School (University of North Carolina, 2005). Patterson, who attended Hillside High School in Durham, N.C., 1972-1975, interviewed other Hillside alumni about the historically African-American high school during school desegregation. Interviewees represent alumni from the 1950s to the 1970s, some of them teachers at Hillside at the time of the interviews. The interview with Evalee Parker discusses the experience of a white student at the school in the 1970s.
Subjects:
African American high school students–North Carolina.
African Americans–Education–North Carolina–Durham.
African Americans–Education–North Carolina–History–20th century.
African Americans–North Carolina–Durham.
Civil rights movements–North Carolina–History–20th century.
Discrimination in education–North Carolina.
Durham (N.C.)–History.
Durham (N.C.)–Social life and customs.
Education–North Carolina–Durham.
Education–North Carolina–History–20th century.
High schools–North Carolina–Durham.
Hillside High School (Durham, N.C.)
North Carolina–Race relations.
Oral history.
Public schools–North Carolina–Durham.
Public schools–North Carolina–History–20th century.
School integration–North Carolina–Durham.
School integration–North Carolina–History–20th century.
Schools–North Carolina–Durham.
Schools–North Carolina–History–20th century.
Segregation in education–North Carolina–History–20th century.
Individual Names in Finding Aid:
Interview U-0115 – Chunn, Gwendolyn Curlee, 17 July 2004
Interview U-0116 – Ford, Yolanda E., 11 March 2005
Interview U-0117 – Forte, Minnie M., 10 February 2005
Interview U-0118 – Foskey, Barbara P., 3 February 2005
Interview U-0119 – Holt, Sterlin, 18 February 2005
Interview U-0120 – Johnson, Eleanor, 11 March 2005
Interview U-0121 – Jones, Beverly Washington, 5 April 2005
Interview U-0122 – Lucas, Jeanne H., 15 April 2005
Interview U-0123 – Miller-Cox, Valerie J., 10 April 2005
Interview U-0124 – O’Neal, Elton M., 22 July 2004
Interview U-0125 – Parker, Evalee S., 5 February 2005
Interview U-0126 – Pointer, James E., 13 February 2005
Interview U-0127 – Pugh-Du Ewa, Heshima, 18 February 2005
Interview U-0128 – Robinson, Jackie, 11 February 2005
Interview U-0129 – Smith, Ellis H., 11 August 2004
Interview U-0130 – Stanback, Barry, 9 February 2005
Interview U-0131 – Thornton, Carolyn, 13 August 2004
Interview U-0132 – Williams, Jacqueline and Marva Shuler, 9 February 2005


Title: The Long Civil Rights Movement: The South Since the 1960s: Oral history and the modern South, 2007 (Series U.13).
Author: Southern Oral History Program.
Location: UNC – Chapel Hill Libraries: Archival Materials (Wilson Library) Southern Historical Collection
Call Number: 4007.U.13
Format: Archival Materials, tapes, transcripts
Description: This series contains a group of 43 interviews conducted by students under the direction of Dr. Jacquelyn Hall during the Spring 2008 semester at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Topics bear on the history of the American South and are related to themes emphasized by the Southern Oral History Program. These themes include, among many others, women’s leadership from the 1920s to the present, second wave feminism, labor and working class history, the history of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, journalism, the legal profession, environmental issues, and southern politics. These class materials are related to the SOHP’s “The Long Civil Rights Movement” initiative, which aims to expand the understanding of the civil rights movement far beyond the dramatic decade of mass protests against segregation, stressing the struggle that began in the 1930s and spawned a series of other social movements from the 1960s onward. Students chose a broad range of topics related to “The Long Civil Rights Movement” including, but are not limited to, post-secondary school desegregation; politics and race relations in Durham, N.C., and Winston-Salem, N.C.; medicine and medical education at Duke University, gender, and race; the sit-in movement in North Carolina; the gay, lesbian, and transgender community in North Carolina; race and gender in athletics; and Spanish-language media. Also included in this series are 25 interviews by Rob Lalka with individuals active in the Orleans Parish Public Schools reform effort. Please see Series U.13 for interviews from Dr. Hall’s Spring 2008 course that do not pertain to “The Long Civil Rights Movement.”
Subjects:
African American athletes.
African American physicians.
Discrimination in medical education.
Discrimination in sports.
Durham (N.C.)–History.
Durham (N.C.)–Politics and government.
Durham (N.C.)–Race relations.
Durham (N.C.)–Social conditions.
Educational change–Louisiana.
Gays–North Carolina.
Hispanic Americans and mass media.
Lesbians–North Carolina.
Medical education–North Carolina.
New Orleans (La.)–History.
Segregation in higher education–Southern States.
Transgender people–North Carolina.
Winston-Salem (N.C.)–History.
Winston-Salem (N.C.)–Politics and government.
Winston-Salem (N.C.)–Race relations.
Winston-Salem (N.C.)–Social conditions.
Women athletes.
Women in medicine.
Individual Names in Finding Aid:
Interview U-0279 – Arakaki, Mia (interviewed by Robert Lalka): Public school reform in New Orleans, La., 11 March 2008
Interview U-0280- Armstrong, Brenda: African American physician at Duke Hospital in Durham, N.C., 29 February 2008
Interview U-0281 – Berger, John Paul, Deanna Leint, Stephanie Marrone, and Cherie Elizabeth Rankin (interviewed by Robert Lalka): Public school reform in New Orleans, La., 7 March 2008
Interview U-0282 – Chastain, Mary (interviewed by Robert Lalka): Public school reform in New Orleans, La., 14 February 2008
Interview U-0283 – Chen, Justin, Justin Lamb, Andrew Sullivan, and Sabrina Sambola (*) (interviewed by Robert Lalka): Public school reform in New Orleans, La., 16 February 2008
Interview U-0284 – Dodson, Daryn and Miji Michelle Park (interviewed by Robert Lalka): Public school reform in New Orleans, La., 6 March 2008
Interview U-0285 – Everett, Robinson O. (*): Politics and race relations in Durham, N.C., 29 February 2008
Interview U-0286, U-0331 – Eversley, Carleton A. G.: Politics and race relations in Durham, N.C., 27 February 2008 and 28 February 2008
Interview U-0287 – Floyd, Kwame A. (interviewed by Robert Lalka): Public school reform in New Orleans, La., 14 February 2008
Interview U-0288 – Freund, Sean (interviewed by Robert Lalka): Public school reform in New Orleans, La., 8 March 2008
Interview U-0289 – Greiner, Charles E. (interviewed by Robert Lalka): Public school reform in New Orleans, La., 16 February 2008
Interview U-0290 – Guitterrez, Kevin (interviewed by Robert Lalka): Public school reform in New Orleans, La., 12 March 2008
Interview U-0291 – Halls, Justin (*) (interviewed by Robert Lalka): Public school reform in New Orleans, La., 16 February 2008
Interview U-0283 – Hammer, Karl-Peter and Rachel Hammer(*) (interviewed by Robert Lalka), 16 February 2008
Interview U-0295 – Johnson, Charles (*): African American professor at Duke University School of Medicine in Durham, N.C., 16 April 2008
Interview U-0296 – Kingsland, Neerav (*) (interviewed by Robert Lalka): Public school reform in New Orleans, La., 10 March 2008
Interview U-0298 – Lee, Howard: Former mayor of Chapel Hill, N.C., 29 February 2008
Interview U-0299 – Leint, Deanna and Cherie Rankin (interviewed by Robert Lalka): Public school reform in New Orleans, La., 7 March 2008
Interview U-0300 – Marley, Melvin B.: Civil rights activism and race relations in Asheboro and Randolph County, N.C., 8 March 2008
Interview U-0302 – Mason, Aria Monette (interviewed by Robert Lalka): Public school reform in New Orleans, La., 13 February 2008
Interview U-0303 – Meinig, Adam (interviewed by Robert Lalka): Public school reform in New Orleans, La., 14 February 2008
Interview U-0304 – Mendez, John (*): Politics and race relations in Wilmington, N.C., 6 February 2008
Interview U-0306 – Mosley, Ann: Race relations and school integration in Asheboro, N.C., 26 February 2008
Interview U-0307 – Muller, Jan: Gay rights and the gay community in the American South, 4 March 2008
Interview U-0308 – Newell, Tyra M. (*) (interviewed by Robert Lalka): Public school reform in New Orleans, La., 11 March 2008
Interview U-0309 – Nix, Megan (interviewed by Robert Lalka): Public school reform in New Orleans, La., 10 March 2008
Interview U-0310 – Orange-Jones, Kira (*) (interviewed by Robert Lalka): Public school reform in New Orleans, La., 12 March 2008
Interview U-0312 – Pearlman, Alexander (interviewed by Robert Lalka): Public school reform in New Orleans, La., 8 March 2008
Interview U-0313 – Pullen, Kendrick D. and Nathan Rothstein (interviewed by Robert Lalka): Public school reform in New Orleans, La., 15 February 2008
Interview U-0315, U-0316 – Rivers, Carithia L.: African American basketball player at North Carolina State University, 28 February 2008 and 3 April 2008
Interview U-0317 – Roberts, Sarah Anne (interviewed by Robert Lalka): Public school reform in New Orleans, La., 14 February 2008
Interview U-0318 – Rok, Megan (interviewed by Robert Lalka): Public school reform in New Orleans, La., 10 March 2008
Interview U-0320 – Sawyer, Llewlee L.: Transgender and lesbian culture in the American South, 21 March 2008
Interview U-0321 – Schum, Debbie (*) (interviewed by Robert Lalka): Public school reform in New Orleans, La., 11 March 2008
Interview U-0323, U-0324 – Sutton, Crystal Lee (*): Trade unions and textile workers in North Carolina, 6 April 2008 and 13 April 2008
Interview U-0325 – Usdin, Sarah (interviewed by Robert Lalka): Public school reform in New Orleans, La., 10 March 2008
Interview U-0326 – Van Gelderen, Federico: Employed in Latino-immigrant broadcast media in the Research Triangle, N.C., 28 February 2008
Interview U-0327 – Williams, John Cardenas, Jr. (interviewed by Robert Lalka): Public school reform in New Orleans, La., 10 March 2008
Interview U-0328 – Wilson, Joanne A. P.: Second African American woman to graduate from Duke University School of Medicine, 21 February 2008
Interview U-0329 – Zartha, Rafael Prieto: Employed in Latino-immigrant press in Charlotte, N.C., 28 March 2008


Title: Mary Ann McDonald collection of Orange Factory oral history materials, 1852-1983.
Author: McDonald, Mary Ann,. collector.
Location: UNC – Chapel Hill Libraries: Archival Materials (Wilson Library) Southern Historical Collection
Call Number: 4381
Format: Archival Materials
Description: In 1978, the city of Durham’s plan to construct a dam and reservoir on the Little River, which would eradicate the textile mill village of Orange Factory, eight miles north of Durham, motivated the people of the village to form the Orange Factory Preservation Society. They obtained nomination for the inclusion of Orange Factory on the National Register of Historic Places. As a result, the engineering company hired to build the dam financed an archeological investigation of the area and a social and economic historical study that included oral history interviews with Orange Factory inhabitants. The findings, however, were not considered sufficiently “historically significant” and, in 1983, Orange Factory’s residents were moved to other homes and construction of the dam began.
Transcripts of interviews conducted in April-May 1983 and a report written in August 1983 by Mary Ann McDonald, a graduate student in folklore at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. McDonald was hired by Mid-Atlantic Archeological Research Inc., of Delaware. She interviewed five men and six women from Orange Factory, N.C., whose dates of birth ranged from 1892 to 1921, all of whom had worked in the Orange Factory mill. Topics of the interviews included physical layout of the mill and its surroundings; relations with co-workers and supervisors; local health care; midwifery; recreational activities, including hunting, fishing, dancing, and crafts such as quilting; religion; and the 1983 closing of the mill and why many people chose to remain in Orange Factory instead of going elsewhere.
Subjects:
Handicraft–North Carolina.
McDonald, Mary Ann.
Mid-Atlantic Archaeological Research, Inc.
Midwives–North Carolina–History.
North Carolina–Religion–20th century.
Obstetrics–North Carolina–History.
Oral history.
Orange County (N.C.)–Social conditions.
Orange County (N.C.)–Social life and customs.
Quilting–North Carolina.
Recreation–North Carolina.
Textile factories–North Carolina–History–20th century.
Textile workers–Health and hygiene–North Carolina.
Textile workers–North Carolina–History–20th century.
Individual Names in Finding Aid:
Effie Roberts Castle
Odell Castle
William Henry Castle
Albert G. Cox, Jr.
Grace Johnson Crabtree
Virginia Johnson Dixon
Chester Ellis
Janie Roberts Ellis
Vesta Roberts Ellis
Vesta Roberts Ellis (Part II)
Beatrice Dixon Lanier
Garland Roberts
Ruth Johnson Suggs


Title: Neighborhood voices : new immigrants in northeast central Durham = Voces del barrio : nuevos immigrantes en noreste central de Durham.
Author:
Hemming, Jill.
Hornsby-Gutting, Angela.
Rouverol, Alicia J., 1961-
Publisher: Durham, NC : Laser Image Corporate Publishing, 2001.
Location: North Carolina Collection, UNC—Chapel Hill
Call Number: Cp325 N397h
Format: Book
Description: 71 p. : ill. ; 21 x 21 cm.
Subjects:
Hispanic Americans — North Carolina — Durham.
Hispanic American neighborhoods — North Carolina — Durham.
Community life — North Carolina — Durham.
Neighborhoods — North Carolina — Durham.


Title: Neighborhood voices [electronic resource] : new immigrants in northeast central Durham = Voces del barrio : nuevos immigrantes en la zona noreste del centro de Durham.
Publisher: Chapel Hill, N.C. : Southern Oral History Program at UNC-Chapel Hill, c2004.
Location: North Carolina Collection, UNC—Chapel Hill
Call Number: CD-ROM C325 N397r
Format: Software
Description: 1 CD-ROM : ill. ; 4 3/4 in.
Note: “A multimedia study of northeast central Durham; Un estudio multi-media del noreste del centro de Durham.”
Description: This CD explores the impacts of rapid Latino immigration into northeast central Durham, long ago a mostly white neighborhood and for many decades a predominately African-American community, and presents a compelling portrait of the community’s past, present, and future.
Contents Durham history/Historia de Durham — New immigrants/Nuevos immigrantes — Future visions/Visiones del futuro.
Subjects:
Hispanic Americans — North Carolina — Durham.
Hispanic American neighborhoods — North Carolina — Durham.
Community life — North Carolina — Durham.
Neighborhoods — North Carolina — Durham.
Durham (N.C.) — Social life and customs.


Title: Oral History Collection, 1933-1978 and nd.
Author: Chafe, William Henry.
Location: Duke: Special Collections Library
Call Number: 2nd 25:B Acc. 87/85: Box 1 c.1, Box 2 c.2; Library Service Center Acc. 03/158:Box 1 c.1
Location 2: Finding aid: http://library.duke.edu/digitalcollections/rbmscl/chafe/inv/
Format: Addition (03-158)(24 items, .6 lin. ft.; dated 1963-1977) contains additional audiocassettes for the collection. Some tapes may duplicate material already in the collection.
Description: The William Henry Chafe Oral History Collection spans the years 1933 through 1978, with most of the materials dated between 1972 and 1978. The collection consists mainly of oral history interview tapes and transcripts, but also includes interview notes and research files related to Chafe’s book Civilities and Civil Rights: Greensboro, North Carolina, and the Black Struggle for Freedom.
Subjects:
Chafe, William Henry.–Civilities and civil rights.
African Americans–Civil rights–North Carolina.
African Americans–North Carolina–Greensboro–Social conditions.
Civil rights–North Carolina–Greensboro.
Greensboro (N.C.)–Race relations.
North Carolina–Politics and government–1951-
Individual Names in Finding Aid:
Allen, Carolyn
Bailey, Tom
Bishop, Cecil
Brandon, Lewis
Breathett, George/Troxler, Kay
Chavis, Vance
Elam, Jack
English, Ike/Notes on C of C docs.
Ford, Robert
Foster, John (2 tapes)
Hariston, Otis
Hudgkins, R. E./Brown, W. R. (KKK)
Jackson, William
Johnson, Walter/Johnson, Nelson
Jones, Mrs. David
Knox, Joe
McNeill, Joseph
Parker, Mrs. Franklin
Player, Willa
Price, Jim
Sanford, Terry/Johnson, Nelson
Schenck, David
Smith, Louise
Taylor, John and Betsy
Troxler, Evelyn
Weaver, Mike
Zane, Edward R.


Title: Piedmont industrialization, 1974-1986 (Series H).
Author: Southern Oral History Program.
Location: UNC – Chapel Hill Libraries: Archival Materials (Wilson Library) Southern Historical Collection
Call Number: 4007.H, 4007.H.6. Durham, N.C.
Format: Archival Materials, tapes, transcripts
Description: The Durham, N.C., interviews document the experiences of workers in the city’s tobacco, textile, and hosiery industries. Durham began its transformation from a crossroads into a major industrial city with the completion of the railroad line between Raleigh and Greensboro just before the Civil War. After the war, Robert F. Morris, one of the largest farmers in Orange County, moved his tobacco business to Durham. William Blackwell, a Person County merchant, acquired the business in 1869 and, in 1870, he took Julian Shakespeare Carr, son of Chapel Hill’s leading merchant, as a partner. Carr assumed full ownership of the plant in 1883. By the mid-1880s, Durham had many other tobacco companies, among them Washington Duke and Sons. The Dukes gradually absorbed Blackwell’s and other firms and, by 1890, had established a consolidated cigarette firm, the American Tobacco Company. Anti-trust action in 1911, however, forced the dissolution of the company, which was reorganized as the new American Tobacco Company consisting of the former Duke properties, and Liggett and Meyers, which included Blackwell’s former holdings.
The textile and hosiery industries in Durham arose in conjunction with the tobacco industry. These mills provided outlets for surplus capital and made bags and other products needed by the tobacco companies. Among Durham’s textile establishments was the Erwin Cotton Manufacturing Company and mill village in West Durham, founded by members of the Duke family. William Erwin, who was related to the Holts of Alamance County and had supervised Plaid Mill (see Series H.2.), served as superintendent. Eventually, Erwin took on Kemp Plummer Lewis, whose family owned the Rocky Mount Cotton Mills, as an associate. The hosiery industry in Durham had similar origins. In 1884, J. S. Carr and J. M. Odell (see Series H.3.), established the Durham Cotton Mill in East Durham. By the 1890s, Carr, driven out of tobacco by the Tobacco Trust, devoted most of his energies to hosiery as he consolidated 14 local mills into one company.
Work is one of the most important topics covered in these interviews. Many of the interviewees migrated to Durham from surrounding farms (among them, Stagville, owned by Bennehan Cameron), and many of them alternated between farm or sawmilling jobs and work in the city’s factories. Often the interviews include accounts of sharecropping, farm work, lumbering, and sawmilling. Among women, domestic service often was their first job. In talking about work in the tobacco factories, the interviewees focus on work conditions, the steps involved in processing tobacco, the division of labor by gender and by race, labor policies, the advent of labor unions, and strikes. The textile and hosiery workers cover similar topics, as well as speedups and time studies. A number of the interviewees relate their personal recollections of William Erwin and Kemp Plummer Lewis.
Race relations are covered more thoroughly in these interviews than in others in the series because many of the tobacco workers were African Americans. Many of the interviewees discussed segregation in the factories, both in jobs and in the facilities provided for blacks and whites. Other topics relating to race relations include segregation and discrimination in the churches, schools, neighborhoods, mill villages, and especially in the unions. Racial violence, such as lynching and Ku Klux Klan incidents, and miscegenation, are also discussed.
Almost all of the interviewees discussed childhood experiences, work as children, education, family life, courtship and marriage, and living conditions. Many of the interviewees described boarding house life, their homes, sanitation facilities, and life in the mill villages. Education occupies a particularly important place in these interviews because some of them were conducted by Kenneth Kornblau, a Duke undergraduate, for a paper on the Durham schools. These interviews focus on the backgrounds and experiences of teachers and school officials and on the history of Durham’s school system.
Music played an important role in the lives of many of the people interviewed. They sang in the tobacco factories, played guitars and other instruments, and formed bands and singing groups to perform gospel music and the blues. Several interviewees shared memories of Gary Davis, a nationally known blues singer from Durham. Two of the interviewees (H-201, H-222) worked as musicians, touring with medicine shows and performing on the radio. Other forms of recreation and entertainment are dances, cornshucking and quilting parties, movies, vaudeville, and sports.
These interviews touch on a variety of other topics. Many of the interviewees discussed illnesses, such as tuberculosis, diphtheria, typhoid, and the flu epidemic of 1918. Medical care, especially the segregated services provided by the tobacco companies, is also covered. Many of the women discussed birth control, pregnancy, childbirth, and abortion. Religion was important in the lives of many of the interviewees, and most of them discussed their church involvement. Crime, street life, and prostitution are also covered in several of the interviews. Finally, most of the interviewees discussed the Depression, and a few of them referred to experiences during World War I and World War II. Piedmont Industrialization, Series H of the Southern Oral History Program Collection, consists of tapes and transcripts of interviews for “Perspectives on Industrialization: The Piedmont Crescent of Industry, 1900-1940,” a project which focuses on the impact of industrialization in seven main areas: Badin, Burlington, Bynum, Catawba County, Charlotte, and Durham, N.C., and Greenville, S.C. There are also interviews listed under the heading “Miscellaneous” with workers from such communities as Carrboro, Greensboro, Gastonia, and Marion, N.C. There is also a short series of tapes relating to Farmville, N.C., and interviews relating to the textile workers’ strike in Elizabethton, Tenn., in 1929. Topics include the development of various industries in these regions, especially textiles, tobacco, hosiery, and furniture and the experiences of workers in these industries, both in their work and in daily life, including health, recreation, religion, family, education, and financial hardships. Also included are the research files for “Like a Family: The Making of a Southern Cotton Mill World” (1987), which draws heavily on the interviews in this series. In a few cases, the interviewer provides additional documentation, such as narrative indices, biographical information on the respondent, clippings, and photographs.
Subjects:
Furniture industry and trade–Southern States.
Furniture workers–Southern States.
Hosiery industry–Southern States–History–20th century.
Hosiery workers–Southern States–Biography.
Industries–North Carolina–Badin–History.
Industries–North Carolina–Bynum–History.
Industries–North Carolina–Catawba County–History.
Industries–North Carolina–Charlotte–History.
Industries–North Carolina–Durham–History.
Industries–North Carolina.
Industries–South Carolina–Greenville–History.
Industries–South Carolina.
Industries–Southern States.
Industries–Tennessee–Elizabethton–History.
North Carolina–Social conditions–20th century.
Oral history.
South Carolina–Social conditions–20th century.
Southern States–Biography.
Strikes and lockouts–Textile industry–Tennessee.
Textile industry–Southern States–History–20th century.
Textile workers–Southern States–Biography.
Tobacco industry–Southern States–History–20th century.
Tobacco workers–Southern States–Biography.
Working class–Southern States–Social conditions.
Individual Names in Finding Aid:
Interview H-0186 – Amey, William: Funeral director; plumber (steel mill, Pittsburgh), 17 November 1976
Interview H-0187 – Arnold, Lellie: Inspector (Durham Hosiery), 11 July 1979
Interview H-0188 – Avery, Robert: Warper, battery tender, oiler, sewer (Erwin Mills), 8 April 1979
Interview H-0189 – Bailey, Mary: Babysitter/domestic worker; tobacco worker (Liggett Myers); farmer, 26 January 1976
Interview H-0190 – Barbee, Annie Mack: Tobacco worker (Liggett Myers), 28 May 1979
Interview H-0191 – Bobbitt, Nellie (*): Tobacco worker (Liggett Myers); silk worker, organizer (International Ladies’ Garment Workers Union); travelling demonstrator, 17 July 1979
Interview H-0192 – Brown, Maude Dowd: Babysitter; maid/domestic worker; tobacco worker (American Tobacco Company), 3 August 1979
Interview H-0193-1 – Buchanan, Bessie: Spinner, warper, spooler (Erwin Mills), June 1977
Interview H-0193-2 – Buchanan, Bessie: Spinner, warper, spooler (Erwin Mills), 13 July 1977
Interview H-0194-1 – Burt, Thomas: Farmer; sawmill worker; cigarette stacker, sweeper, elevator operator (American Tobacco Company); brickyard worker; wagon driver; butler/yardman; worker (Seaboard Railroad), 26 October 1976
Interview H-0194-2, H-0194-3 – Burt, Thomas: Farmer; sawmill worker; cigarette stacker, sweeper, elevator operator (American Tobacco Company); brickyard worker; wagon driver; butler/yardman; worker (Seaboard Railroad), 6 February 1979
Interview H-0195 – Caesar, Hallie: Stemmer (R. J. Reynolds, Liggett Myers), 21 May 1979
Interview H-0196 – Cheatham, Pansy: Tobacco worker (Liggett Myers, American Tobacco Company), 9 July 1979
Interview H-0197 – Clark, Chester: Farmer; sawmill worker; mechanic (Seaboard Railroad); construction worker; cigarette cutter (American Tobacco Company), 5 January 1979, 26 January 1979, 8 June 1989
Interview H-0197 – Clark, Roxanna: Babysitter; farmer; stemmer (American Tobacco Company, Liggett & Myers), 5 January 1979, 26 January 1979, 8 June 1989
Interview H-0198 – Cooke, Elizabeth H.: Teacher, 17 April 1979
Interview H-0199 – Dove, Mary Magaline: Stemmer, tobacco blender (Liggett & Myers); flour mill worker, 7 July 1979
Interview H-0200 – Dunn, Maude W.: Teacher, school principal, 20 April 1979
Interview H-0201 – Ellington, Harvey: Roper (textile mill); musician, 1 March 1979, 5 April 1979
Interview H-0202 – Glenn, Bessie W.: Cigarette packer (Liggett & Myers); looper (Durham Hosiery, Gann’s Hosiery), 12 July 1979
Interview H-0203 – Henry, Lovie (*): Knitter (Carr Hosiery); stemmer (Liggett & Myers); domestic worker, June 1977
Interview H-0204 – Hodges, Estelle: Farmer; cook; babysitter/housekeeper; stemmer (Liggett & Myers), 23 May 1979
Interview H-0205 – Latta, J. Ernest: Auto mechanic; carpenter; mill wright; machinist (Liggett & Myers); union organizer, 7 June 1977
Interview H-0206 – Lowery, Leota: Dimestore clerk; seamer (Danville Hosiery); waitress; telephone operator; looper (Durham Hosiery Mill), 17 July 1979
Interview H-0207 – McCaughin, Mamie: Teacher, 19 April 1979
Interview H-0208 – McMillon, Salina: Farmer; servant; worker (Duke University), 25 October 1976
Interview H-0209 – Mack, Charlie Necoda: Carpenter (Liggett & Myers), 22 May 1979
Interview H-0210 – Marcom, Fannie: Knitter (Knitwell Hosiery, North State Knitting Mill, Louise Mill, Golden Belt); packer (American Tobacco Company, Liggett & Myers),
Interview H-0211 – Miller, Dora Scott: Stemmer; butt machine worker (Liggett & Myers); seamstress, 6 June 1979
Interview H-0212-1 – Mitchiner, Reginald: Stemmer; sweeper; belt oiler (Liggett & Myers); porter; hat checker; valet/shop assistant; cook; butler/gardener, 15 November 1976
Interview H-0212-2 – Mitchiner, Reginald: Stemmer; sweeper; belt oiler (Liggett & Myers); porter; hat checker; valet/shop assistant; cook; butler/gardener, 7 December 1976
Interview H-0212-3 – Mitchiner, Reginald: Stemmer; sweeper; belt oiler (Liggett & Myers); porter; hat checker; valet/shop assistant; cook; butler/gardener, 7 February 1979 and 23 May 1979
Interview H-0213 – Oakley, Maxie: Seamer (Durham Hosiery); nurse (Watts Hospital), 12 July 1979
Interview H-0214 – O’Neal, Reuben: Contruction worker; tobacco picker; municipal worker; tobacco warehouse man; stock room assistant; laborer (Liggett & Myers), 16 August 1979
Interview H-0215 – Page, Frank: Tobacco worker, 3 December 1976
Interview H-0216 – Parks, George: Accountant, manager, vice-president, president (Golden Belt Hosiery),
Interview H-0217 – Patterson, John: Sanitation worker; packer; sweeper (American Tobacco Company); farmer; sawmill worker; packing machine operator (Austin Heating Company); worker (Seaboard Railway); janitor (florist shop); fireman and laundry worker (Lincoln Hospital), 27 July 1977
Interview H-0218 – Pearson, Conrad Odell: Lawyer; civil rights leader, 18 April 1979
Interview H-0219 – Phillips, E. S. (*): Water carrier, 9 February 1977
Interview H-0220 – Phillips, Edward L.: Teacher; principal; assistant superintendent (Durham City Schools), 19 April 1979
Interview H-0221 – Pratt, Bertie (*): Stemmer (American Tobacco Company, Liggett & Myers), March 1975
Interview H-0222 – Pridgen, Samuel Lee: Rag picker; spinner (Durham Hosiery); United States Army; musician, 16 February 1979
Interview H-0223 – Richmond, Obie: Packer, foreman (American Tobacco); mail carrier, June 1977
Interview H-0224 – Richmond, Ozzie Linwood: Truck driver; shed worker; stemmer (American Tobacco Company); kitchen worker (Duke West Union, Watts Hospital); dishwasher (Martha Washington Tea Room), June 1977
Interview H-0225 – Riley, Luther E. (*): Oiler, battery filler, weaver, time study worker (Erwin Mills); grocery store manager; supervisor (Duke University Stores), July 1977
Interview H-0226 – Russell, Charles (*): Farm worker, 30 November 1976
Interview H-0227, H-0228 – Saunders, Vernon: Loomer, weaver, shipping room worker (Erwin Mills); industrial engineer, 24 May 1979
Interview H-0227, H-0228 – Saunders, Vernon, Mrs.
Interview H-0229 – Scott, Blanche: Babysitter/domestic; stemmer (Liggett & Myers); beautician, 11 July 1979
Interview H-0230 – Harris, Martha Gena: Cigarette catcher (American Tobacco Company, Durham), 29 April 1977
Interview H-0231 – Trice, Richard: Sawmiller; storage room worker (Liggett & Myers), 16 February 1978, 1 March 1979
Interview H-0232 – Tucker, James: Stemmer, mobile lift operator (American Tobacco Company), 1 August 1977
Interview H-0233 – Turner, Margaret: Domestic/cook; cigarette sealer, Holmes cleaning woman (American Tobacco Company), 2 June 1979
Interview H-0234 – Williamson, Theotis: Spinner (Erwin Mill), February 1977
Interview H-0235 – Winn, Loyd Erwin: Worker (Sprinkler System Company); cotton farmer; tobacco sacker (American Tobacco), 21 July 1977
Interview H-0235-A – Jenks, Esther: Spooler (Royal Cotton Mills, Wake Forest), battery filler and smasher (Erwin Mills, Durham), recording secretary (Textile Workers Union of America), 26 April 1977
Interview H-0235-B – Turner, Josephine: Chauffeur (Lipscomb family, Durham), manager (Turner Dairy Bar, Durham), janitor (Boeing Aircraft, Seattle, Wash.), community activist (East End, Durham), candidate for city council (Durham, 1972, 1974), 7 June 1976
Persons from Durham: Franck, Richard C.


DURHAM COUNTY LIBRARY OWNS THIS ITEM:

Title: The pride of Durham [videorecording].
Author:Executive producer, Alan Markow. Producer, Daniel Wright. Produced by Media 8 in cooperation with General Telephone of the Southeast for the Durham County Centennial Commission.
Publisher: [Durham, N.C. : Durham County Centennial Commission, 1980-1981?]
Location: UNC – Chapel Hill Libraries: North Carolina Collection
Call Number: Videocassette C971.32 D96p
Format: Video cassette
Description: Produced for Durham, North Carolina’s centennial celebration in 1981, this video tells of the history of Durham, its current status, and goals for its future. Includes interviews with Durham residents, businessmen and supporters Bill Coman, Margaret Nygard, Terry Sanford, Dr. A.N. Whiting, Dr. William Antyan, Dr. James Davis, Margaret Haywood, and George Watts Hill.
Subjects:
Duke family.
Duke University–History.
Durham (N.C.)–Biography.
Durham (N.C.)–Description and travel.
Durham (N.C.)–Economic conditions.
Durham (N.C.)–History.
Durham (N.C.)–Social life and customs.
Industries–North Carolina–Durham.
North Carolina Central University–History.
Research Triangle Park (N.C.)–History.
Textile industry–North Carolina–Durham–History.
Tobacco industry–North Carolina–Durham–History.
Web address: http://search.trln.org/search?id=UNCb4143345


DURHAM COUNTY LIBRARY OWNS A TRANSCRIPT OF THIS ITEM:

Title: Richard C Franck oral history, 1975.
Author: Franck, Richard C.
Location: Duke: Special Collections Library, Library Service Center, Manuscripts (Reading Room only)
Call Number: Library Service Center Box 1, c.1
Format: Manuscript: cassettes, transcript
Description: Duke University student; his interviews were conducted on behalf of the Durham Bicentennial Committee.
Collection comprises 3 audiocassette tapes and a transcript for oral history interviews Franck conducted on the history of the Old West Durham neighborhood. Interviewees include Zeb Stone, John C. Dailey, O. A. Eubanks, I. L. Dean, William Ruffin, Samuel Dennis, John Cameron McDonald, Frank T. De Vyver, and O. C. Crabtree. Topics covered include, among others, the Erwin Cotton Mills (including William Allen Erwin, mill work, unionization, strikes, company housing, and community support), Ninth Street businesses, West Durham School, churches, habits of the working classes, and local customs. Use copies of cassette tapes must be made before a patron may access this collection.
Subjects:
Cotton manufacture–North Carolina–Durham
Cotton textile industry–North Carolina–Durham–History
Cotton textile industry–North Carolina–Employees
Crabtree, O C
Dailey, John C
De Vyver, Frank Traver–1904-
Dean, I L
Dennis, Samuel
Durham (NC.)–History.
Durham (NC.)–Social conditions.
Durham (NC.)–Social life and customs.
Erwin Cotton Mills
Erwin, William Allen–1856-1932
Eubanks, O A
Franck, Richard C
Labor unions
McDonald, John Cameron
Ruffin, William
Stone, Zeb
Strikes and lockouts–Textile industry–Southern States–History
Textile workers–Labor unions–Southern States–History
Textile workers–North Carolina–Durham
Working class–North Carolina


Title: Semans family papers, 1920-2002 and undated
Author: Semans family.
Location: Manuscripts
Call Number (Location): 6th 19:C (92-116, 92-119, 92-068, 92-069, 96-150, 96-151) Acc. 92-116, 92-119…: Box 1 c.1 (Manuscripts)
Format: audiocassette tapes, transcripts
Description: The addition (92-069) (185 items, dated 1990) to the Semans Family Papers collection contains audiocassette tapes and transcripts of oral history interviews conducted by Judy Hogan with Roland Alston, an employee of Mary Duke Biddle and the Semans family.


DURHAM COUNTY LIBRARY OWNS THIS ITEM:

Title: The Sisters behind Brothers (panel discussion)
Publisher: Durham County Library North Carolina Collection
Panel members: Ann Atwater, Karen Bethea Shields, Beverly Washington Jones, Vivian McCoy, Joyce Thorpe Nichols, Tim Tyson
Moderator: Christina Green
Date: July 23, 2001
Location: North Carolina Collection, Durham County Library
Format: 2 cassettes. 1 cd, two videos, transcripts


Title: Southern communities: Listening for a Change: New immigrants project, 1998-1999, (Abstract K.2.2).
Author: Southern Oral History Program.
Location: UNC – Chapel Hill Libraries: Archival Materials (Wilson Library) Southern Historical Collection
Call Number: 4007.K.2.2
Format: Archival Materials, tapes, transcripts
Description: Interviews consider the impact of immigration on North East Central Durham, N.C., a transitional community once composed predominantly of African Americans, but now increasingly Latino. In 1998 and 1999, project directors Alicia Rouverol and Jill Hemming and researchers Colin Austin, Ann Kaplan, and Angela Hornsby conducted 23 interviews with immigrants and with long-time community members from the North East Central neighborhood. The interviews explore how community is created and re-created under such circumstances and how individuals derive a sense of meaning in the midst of major social transformations. Questions focused on daily life in North East Central Durham, what qualities of community each group contributed to the neighborhood, conflicts between groups, and opportunities to build bridges across racial and cultural divides. Five of the interviews were conducted in Spanish.
Subjects:
African American neighborhoods–North Carolina–Durham.
African Americans–Relations with Latin Americans.
Church work with minorities–North Carolina–Durham.
Community development–North Carolina–Durham.
Durham (N.C.)–Emigration and immigration.
Durham (N.C.)–Social conditions.
Hispanic Americans–North Carolina–Durham.
Latin Americans–North Carolina–Durham.
North Carolina–History.
North Carolina–Social life and customs.
Wagstaff, Jacqueline.
Individual Names in Finding Aid:
Interview K-0130 – Bowick, Wade C.: Elder, United for Christ Church, Durham, N.C.
Interview K-0131 – Brown, H. Brevard: Urban minister, First Baptist Church, Durham, N.C.
Interview K-0132 – Clayton, Rebecca: Teacher, Eastway Elementary School, Durham, N.C.
Interview K-0133 – Godair, Johnny: Pastor, United Pentecostal Church, Durham, N.C.
Interview K-0134 – Thomas, William: Deacon, Greater St. Paul Missionary Baptist Church and president, Albright Community Association, Durham, N.C.
Interview K-0135 – Clemments, Jacqueline: Lincoln Heath Center, Durham, N.C.
Interview K-0136 – Heffernan, John, O.F.M.: Associate pastor, Immaculate Conception Catholic Church, Durham, N.C.
Interview K-0137 – Schmidt, Evelyn D., M.D.: Executive director, Lincoln Health Center, Durham, N.C.
Interview K-0138 – Villasana, Ann-Marie: Durham, N.C.
Interview K-0139 – Carbajal, Jose Armando: Honduran immigrant, community organizer, Durham, N.C.
Interview K-0140 – Chalmers, Steven: Captain, Durham Police Department, Durham, N.C.
Interview K-0141 – Crews, George (*): Coordinator, NECD (North East Central Durham) Community Service Center, Durham, N.C.
Interview K-0142 – Dunford, Martina: Program director, Edgemont Community Center, Durham, N.C.
Interview K-0143 – Ridgle, Lawrence: Durham, N.C.
Interview K-0144 – Ridgle, Lawrence: Durham, N.C.
Interview K-0145 – Wagstaff, Jacqueline: Community organizer, Durham, N.C.
Interview K-0146 – de-Heer, Julia Peaks: Durham, N.C.
Interview K-0147 – Fabila, Concepcion (*): Mexican immigrant, Durham, N.C.
Interview K-0148 – Galvan, Rosa: Mexican immigrant, Durham, N.C.
Interview K-0149 – Jones, Michael G.: Director, funeral business, Durham, N.C.
Interview K-0150 – Lopez, Jose: Mexican immigrant, Durham, N.C.
Interview K-0151 – Mendez, Armando: Mexican immigrant, Durham, N.C.
Interview K-0152 – Perez-Jolles, Rossana: Colombian immigrant, Durham, N.C.
Interview K-0658 – Olave, Katushka: Durham County Literacy Council, Durham, N.C. Interview Date: 4 December 1998.
Interview K-0659 – Olave, Katushka: Durham County Literacy Council, Durham, N.C. Interview Date: 9 December 1998.


DURHAM COUNTY LIBRARY OWNS THIS ITEM:

Title: Southwest Central Durham : representin’ like what!
Author: Duke University. Center for Documentary Studies.
Publisher: Durham, N.C. : Duke University Center for Documentary Studies, [1998]
Location: North Carolina Collection
Call Number: C971.32 D96s1
Format: Archival Materials, tapes, transcripts
Subjects: African American neighborhoods — North Carolina — Durham — History.
Durham (N.C.) — History.
Durham (N.C.) — Social life and customs.
Durham (N.C.) — Social conditions.


Title: Special research projects: Life review (1997), 1997 (Series R.11).
Author: Southern Oral History Program.
Location: UNC – Chapel Hill Libraries: Archival Materials (Wilson Library) Southern Historical Collection
Call Number: 4007.R.11
Format: Archival Materials, tapes, transcripts
Description: Interviews conducted by students in an oral history course taught by Alicia Rouverol at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in the fall of 1997. Included are interviews with a history professor at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, with a Japanese immigrant to North Carolina, with a paramedical technologist at Lincoln Hospital in Durham, N.C., and other North Carolina residents.
Subjects:
African Americans–Appalachian Region, Southern.
Immigrants–North Carolina.
Japanese Americans–North Carolina.
Lincoln Hospital (Durham, N.C.).
Mormon women–North Carolina.
Nurses–North Carolina.
Teachers–North Carolina–History–20th century.
Individual Names in Finding Aid:
Interview R-0106 – Bailey, Fannie Mae Mills
Interview R-0107, R-0108, R-0109 – Blackwood, Julia M. (*)
Interview R-0110 – Faulkner, Catrina McClelland
Interview R-0111, R-0112 – Fore, Keiko
Interview R-0113, R-0114, R-0115 – Goodwin, Margaret Kennedy
Interview R-0116, R-0117, R-0118 – Hiatt, Norma J.
Interview R-0119, R-0120, R-0121 – Hubbard, Norma Stevenson
Interview R-0122, R-0123, R-0124 – Mathews, Donald G.
Interview R-0125, R-0126, R-0127 – Miles, Don W.
Interview R-0128 – Ray, Geraldine Coon
Interview R-0129 – Ray, John Troy
Interview R-0130 – Ray, Geraldine Coon
Interview R-0131, R-0132, R-0133 – Smithson, Andrew F.
Interview R-0134, R-0135, R-0136 – Thompson, Joe (*)


Title: Special research projects: Miscellaneous projects, 1980s-1990s (Series R.1-R.9).
Author: Southern Oral History Program.
Location: UNC – Chapel Hill Libraries: Archival Materials (Wilson Library) Southern Historical Collection
Call Number: 4007.R.1-R.9
Format: Archival Materials, tapes, transcripts
Description: Included are projects about (Series R.1) the war on poverty in North Carolina; (Series R.2) Latinos in North Carolina; (Series R.3) the Hindu community in the Raleigh-Durham area; (Series R.4) integration and health care in North Carolina, with an emphasis on the training and experiences of African American doctors. (Series R.5) country musician Lily May Ledford, a member of the Coon Creek Girls; (Series R.6) the African American working class, especially workers in sawmills and lumbering, 1930s-1950s; (Series R.7) the Gateway Transitional Families Program for families in public housing in Charlotte, N.C.; (Series R.8) Montagnard refugees from Vietnam; and (Series R.9) contemporary funeral customs in the Gullah community in Saint Helena, S.C.

Persons from Durham: Chandra, Subhash; Chandra, Kiran; Sharma, Gangadhar; Sharma, Saroj; Timble, Swati N.; Venkataraman, Geetha
List will be completed at a later date.


Title: Special research projects: New Hope Community, 2002 (Series R.15).
Individual Names in Finding Aid:
Interview R-0166 – Blackwood, Nannie
Interview R-0167 – Strayhorn, Robert
Author: Southern Oral History Program.
Location: UNC – Chapel Hill Libraries: Archival Materials (Wilson Library) Southern Historical Collection
Call Number: 4007.R.15
Format: Archival Materials, tapes, transcripts
Description: Interviews conducted by Kieran Taylor about the history of and community life in the New Hope community in Orange County, N.C., near Chapel Hill. Interviews discuss Blackwood and Strayhorn family history, history of the Blackwood farm, truck farming, farm life, the church community, and education, among other topics. Nannie Blackwood also describes her work as a nurse at Watts Hospital in Durham, N.C.
Subjects:
Blackwood family.
Community life–North Carolina–History–20th century.
Family–North Carolina–Social life and customs.
Farm life–North Carolina.
Nurses–North Carolina–History–20th century.
Orange County (N.C.)–Social life and customs.
Strayhorn family.
Watts Hospital (Durham, N.C.).


Title: The voices of Durham, a shared tradition : an oral history of the arts in Durham
Author:
Niedel, Selaine Benaim.
Davis, Chuck, 1937-
Duke University. Master of Arts in Liberal Studies Program.
Miles, Duke.
Norflett, Walter.
Palmer, Jan.
Pendergraft, Norman E., 1934-
Pyne, Mary.
Rankin, Dorothy Newsom.
Rowand, Joe.
Sanford, Terry, 1917-1998.
Wilson, Anna Ludwig.
Publisher: 1989
Location: Duke University Archives
Call Number: 001.3 V889, 1989-NI c.1; 001.3 V889, 1989-NI Supplement: sound cassettes (in Archives)1-25 c.1
Format: Cassettes, Transcript
Description: Michael Marsicano lecture — Walter Norflett — Dorothy Kitchen — Michael Cerveris — Jessie Kearney — Joan Tetel-Hanks — Mary Duke Biddle Trent Semans — Anna Ludwig Wilson — Duke Miles — Norman Pendergraft — Janice Palmer — Joe Rowand — Mary Pyne — Dorothy Newsom Rankin — Ella Fountain Pratt– Tom McGuire — Montrose Moses — Josephine Clement — Chuck Davis — Senator Terry Sanford
Subjects:
Art–North Carolina–Durham–Interviews
Cerveris, Michael–Interviews
Clement, Josephine–Interviews
Community arts projects
Davis, Chuck–1937—Interviews
Durham (NC.)
Kearney, Jessie–Interviews
Kitchen, Dorothy–Interviews
Marsicano, Michael–1956—Interviews
McGuire, Tom–Interviews
Miles, Duke–Interviews
Moses, Montrose–Interviews
Norflett, Walter–Interviews
Palmer, Jan–Interviews
Pendergraft, Norman E,–1934—Interviews
Pratt, Ella Fountain–Interviews
Pyne, Mary–Interviews
Rankin, Dorothy Newsom–Interviews
Rowand, Joe–Interviews
Sanford, Terry–1917-1998–Interviews
Semans, Mary Duke Biddle Trent–Interviews
Tetel-Hanks, Joan–Interviews
Wilson, Anna Ludwig–Interviews


Title: Woman’s College Oral History Project, 2003-2006
Author: Happer, Carolyn Murray, 1938-
Location: Duke University Archives
Call Number: Cage Box 1
Format: Archival Materials: manuscript, cassettes, slides
Description: Nine interviews with alumnae of the Duke University Woman’s College conducted by Carolyn Murray Happer from 2003 to 2004. Also includes one recording of alumnae reminisces from the 75th anniversary celebration of the Woman’s College Library in 2006.
Interviewees discuss their experiences and perceptions from their years at Duke University during the period of the co-ordinate college which existed from 1930 to 1972. Subjects interviewed include several class leaders, a member of the Duke family, and others who have had long established ties to the school after graduation. Also includes one recording of alumnae reminisces from the 75th anniversary celebration of the Woman’s College Library in 2006.
Subjects:
Buschman, Barbara Perkins.
Corbin, Charlotte.
Crowell, Alice.
Duke University. Woman’s College.
Duke University. Woman’s College–History.
Duke University. Woman’s College–Students.
Greenberg, Bluma.
Happer, Carolyn Murray, 1938-.
Harris, Margaret A.
Lanning, Elizabeth Williams.
Merritt, Gertrude.
Oral history interviews.
Semans, Mary Duke Biddle Trent.
Women–Education (Higher)–North Carolina–Durham.
Women in higher education–North Carolina–Durham.
Individual Names in Finding Aid: Interviews:

Buschman, Barbara Perkins, Class of 1946. Interviewed 29 September 2003. Buschman also worked at Duke from 1946 to 1993 in various positions. Her interview covers primarily her undergraduate years. A2003-45. One cassette.
Corbin, Charlotte, Class of 1935. Interviewed 2 July 2003. Former Duke Alumni Office employee. A2003-29. Two cassettes, 3 sides.
Crowell, Alice, Class of 1932. Interviewed 19 June 2003. A2003-29. One cassette.
Greenberg, Bluma, Class of 1947. Interviewed 23 September 2003. Greenberg discussed how she was treated as a Jewish student at Duke during WWII as well as soldiers returning from the war to school. A2003-45. Two cassettes, 3 sides.
Harris, Margaret A., Class of 1938 and Law School Class of 1940. Also served on the Board of Trustees, 1975-1987. Interviewed 18 July 2003. Harris discusses her decision to attend Duke and her time in Law School. A2003-45. One cassette.
Lanning, Elizabeth Williams, Class of 1931. Married Duke professor John Tate Lanning. Interviewed 17 July 2003. Lanning transferred to Duke from Queens and discusses social life, including her sorority and dances. A2003-45. One cassette, one side only.
Merritt, Gertrude, Class of 1931. Long-time Duke librarian. Interviewed 25 June 2003. Restricted. A2003-29. One cassette.
Semans, Mary Duke Biddle Trent, Class of 1939. Served on Board of Trustees, 1961-1981. Interviewed 6 February 2004. A2004-6. One cassette.
Smith, Margaret Taylor, Class of 1947. Interviewed 24 October 2003. A2004-6. One cassette.
Woman’s College Library reminisces. 23 March 2006. UA2006-35. One cassette.
Web address: finding aid: http://library.duke.edu/digitalcollections/rbmscl/uawomoral/inv/


Title: Working in tobacco : an oral history of Durham’s tobacco factory workers
Author: Beverly Jones and Claudia Egelhoff, editors.
Publisher: [Durham, N.C. : History Dept., North Carolina Central University?, c1988]
Location: UNC – Chapel Hill Libraries: Archival Materials (Wilson Library) Southern Folklife Collection
Call Number: F264.D9 W68 1988
Location 2: North Carolina Collection: CpBo W926j
Format: Archival Materials, tapes, transcripts
Description: “These interviews were conducted during the Fall of 1987 by participants in an oral history seminar in the History Department at North Carolina Central University.”–P. 13.


World War II Oral History Interviews, Durham County Library

DURHAM COUNTY LIBRARY OWNS THESE ITEMS

Interviewee: Elwood Wiley Bagwell
Web Interviewer: Michael Smith
Date: April 23, 1996
Location: Durham County Library
Description: An oral history with Elwood Wiley Bagwell. Born November 7, 1919, in Durham, Bagwell served in the Army Air Corps during World War Two. Following the war he worked for the West Durham Lumber Company for thirty-nine years, from which he recently retired.

Interviewee: Lee Barnes
Intervewer: Michael Smith
Date: June 12, 1996
Location: Barnes’s home, Durham, NC
Description: An oral history with Elwood Wiley Bagwell. Born November 7, 1919 in Durham, Bagwell served in the Army Air Corps during World War Two. Following the war he worked for the West Durham Lumber Company for thirty-nine years, from which he recently retired.

Interviewee: Charles Lindsey Brewer
Intervewer: Michael Smith
Date: May 17, 1996
Location: Brewer’s home, Durham, NC
Description: An oral history of Charles Lindsey Brewer. Mr. Brewer was born on April 22, 1926 in Durham, North Carolina. Before enlisting in the navy and while still in high school, Brewer took advantage of the new social and economic opportunities the war offered Durham teenagers, such as USO dances and summer jobs at the post office and Camp Butner. He joined the navy in 1944 and served as a seaman on an oil tanker in the South Pacific until after the Japanese surrender. Following the war, Brewer attended Duke University under the GI Bill. He graduated in 1950 with a BA in business administration.

Interviewee: Louis James Carver
Intervewer: Michael Smith
Date: May 16, 1996
Location: Carver’s home, Durham NC
Description: An oral history of Louis James Carver. Born February 7, 1921, Carver has lived most of his life in Durham, North Carolina. Carver was drafted into the navy in 1943 and served the remainder of the war on the light cruiser Topeka as an escort for aircraft carriers in the Pacific. Returning home, he was stationed in Portland, Oregon, until 1946. Following the war, Carver worked for a number of companies in Durham until he purchased theYellow Cab Company, which he ran until his retirement in 1994. At the time of the interview he was active with the Civitans and in promoting Durham’s history.

Interviewee: Stewart Fulbright
Intervewer: Michael Smith
Date: April 26, 1996
Location: Durham County Library
Description: An oral history with Dr. Stewart Fulbright. Born December 11, 1919, in Springfield, Missouri, Dr. Fulbright served in the Tuskegee Airmen during World War Two, and afterward earned a Ph.D. in business administration from Ohio State in 1953. After many years as a faculty member and administrator at North Carolina Central University, Dr. Fulbright retired in 1982.

Interviewee: Betty Ann Arnold Hodges
Intervewer: Michael Smith
Date: Februbary 22, 1996
Location: Hodges’s home, Durham, NC
Description: An oral history of Betty Ann Arnold Hodges. Born October 4, 1926, in Waynesboro, Virginia, where she apprenticed as a linotype operator when wartime manpower shortages forced employers to seek out women for jobs traditionally held by men. She attended school at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where she received an A.B. in English. Moving to Durham, N.C., in 1954, Hodges worked at the Durham Morning Herald, where she served in several capacities, including style editor and, for 43 years, book columnist. Hodges married newspaperman Ed Hodges in 1954; they had two children.

Interviewee: Louis Edward Hodges, Jr.
Intervewer: Michael Smith
Date: February 22, 1996
Location: Hodges’s home, Durham, NC.
Description: An oral history of Louis Edward Hodges. Born February 25, 1919, in Tarboro, North Carolina, Hodges grew up in the North Carolina Piedmont. In 1937, Hodges went to work as a sportswriter for the Winston-Salem Journal, beginning a long career as a journalist. Hodges joined the army air corps in 1941 and served as a pilot in the China/Burma/India theater during World War Two. Following the war he attended the University of North Carolina under the G.I. Bill, graduating in 1949. Following graduation Hodges went to work as a writer for the Durham Herald Sun, where he worked until his retirement.

Interviewee: William Emory McDonald
Intervewer: Michael Smith
Date: April 30, 1996
Location: McDonalds’s home, Durham, NC.
Description: An oral history of William Emory McDonald. Born in Detroit, Michigan, McDonald served in the Tuskegee Airmen during World War Two and graduated from the University of Michigan in 1950 with an engineering degree. McDonald subsequently worked as the director of the physical plant at North Carolina Central University, from which he retired in 1991.


DURHAM COUNTY LIBRARY OWNS THIS ITEM:

Title: The yellow house : an oral history of the Hill Center’s original building, 1977-2002
Author:
compiled by the Hill Center, Class of 2002 ; edited by Mary Beth Markham and Jan Lamb ; foreword by Lee Smith.
Hill Center (Durham, N.C.)
Lamb, Jan.
Markham, Mary Beth.
Publisher: Durham, N.C. : The Hill Center, 2002.
Location: North Carolina Collection
Call Number: C371.9 Y44h
Format: Archival Materials, tapes, transcripts


Title: Youth Document Durham records, 1996-1999
Author: Center for Documentary Studies.
Location: Duke University Archives: Library Service Center (Reading Room only)
Call Number: Library Service Center Acc. 09/005: Box 1 – Box 31
Format: Archival Materials
Description: Youth Document Durham was a project organized and funded by Duke University’s Center for Documentary Studies. It sought to bring together students, aged 12-16, from throughout Durham to document local history and contemporary issues through oral history, photography, and narrative writings.
The collection consists largely of audio cassette tapes with interviews conducted by participants in Youth Document Durham. Acquired as part of the Archives for Visual Arts.
Subjects:
Center for Documentary Studies
Durham (NC.)
Local history–Durham (NC.)
Restrictions: collection closed


Interviews from “The State of Things” Program with Frank Stasio, WUNC Radio

Title: Barack Obama Draws a Crowd
Web address: http://wunc.org/programs/news/archive/NYK1102.mp3/view?searchterm=durham
Date: Friday, November 02 2007
Description: Democratic Presidential candidate Barack Obama made a campaign stop in Durham Thursday. Four thousand people turned out for the event at North Carolina State University. Yasmeen Khan has more on the rally.


Title: The Beast
Web address: http://wunc.org/tsot/archive/sot0912c08.mp3/view?searchterm=durham
Date: Friday, September 12 2008
Description: Education is the foundation of Durham-based hip-hop band, The Beast. In fact, the group was first formed to complete an academic project. But what started as a scholarly assignment has now turned into an exciting fusion of knowledge, jazz and spoken word. The Beast has just released its first CD. The band members stop by to perform and chat with host Frank Stasio about musical storytelling and reaching out to young emcees.


Title: The Book Exchange 1933-2009
Web address: http://wunc.org/programs/news/archive/Nli021609BOOKSTORE.mp3/view?searchterm=durham
Date: Monday, February 16 2009
Description: A downtown Durham institution closed its doors over the weekend. The Book Exchange had been in business for 75 years. For most of those years – The Book Exchange was the place to be in academic circles for used course books and law books. Owners say it’s more than just the bad economy that forced this store to close. Competition from the internet has been gobbling up profits for years.


Title: Brighter Leaves
Web address: http://wunc.org/tsot/archive/sot1112c08.mp3/view
Date: Wednesday, November 12 2008
Description: From the American Dance Festival and the Bull Durham Blues Fest to Full Frame and the Troika Music Festival, Durham is home to some of the biggest arts and culture events in North Carolina. But, the thriving arts scene that exists today wasn’t built in a day. In fact, a new book called “Brighter Leaves” reveals how Durham was slowly transformed from a city known mainly for mass tobacco production into one of the most admired cultural capitals of the South. Historian Jim Wise joins host Frank Stasio to revisit Durham’s artistic roots and talk about what’s next for creative culture in the Bull City.


Title: Bull Durham at 20
Web address: http://wunc.org/programs/news/archive/NDD0612Bulls_at_20.mp3/view?searchterm=durham
Date: Thursday, June 12 2008
Description: Twenty years ago this week, the movie Bull Durham was released in theaters. The film starred Kevin Costner, Susan Sarandon, and Tim Robbins. It also starred the city of Durham, as nearly every scene in the film was shot in the Triangle. It would go on to commercial and critical success. It was named by Sports Illustrated as the greatest sports movie ever made. One of the lasting themes from Bull Durham comes not from the love triangle in the story or the realistic baseball scenes, it comes from the players pursuing a major-league dream that may never come true. Dave DeWitt reports that life hasn’t changed for minor leaguers – where every day might bring a grand slam or a pink slip.


Title: Chancellor James Ammons
Web address: http://www.ibiblio.org/wunc_archives/sot/?p=407
Description: Celebrated educator James Shepard founded what would become North Carolina Central University in 1910. Since then, the college has been through several name changes — including Durham State Normal School and the North Carolina College for Negroes. Recently, the school added a major bioresearch facility and is in the midst of a growth spurt, but there have been high-profile setbacks, including the costly removal of toxic mold from two new dormitories. Host Melinda Penkava speaks with James Ammons, chancellor of North Carolina Central University, about the future of the school and its mission. Listener Call-In. (59:00)


Title: Documenting Duke
Web address: http://www.ibiblio.org/wunc_archives/sot/?p=712
Description: Host Frank Stasio is joined by John Biewen, director of the Audio Program at the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University. This semester, John’s students produced audio profiles of some of Duke’s support staff. The assignment took on a different tone after news broke of the alleged rape of a Durham woman by members of the Duke men’s lacrosse team. John Beiwen talks to host Frank Stasio about what his students produced and includes examples from two of the pieces. One of the student producers, Bria Dolnick, joins the conversation. (26:00)


Title: Duke students Return
Web address: http://wunc.org/tsot/archive/sot082306a.mp3/view?searchterm=durham
Date: Wednesday, August 23 2006
Description: As college students return to campuses this week, we check in with Duke and North Carolina Central representatives as well as Durham area neighborhoods to see how the community is coming together after a divisive spring semester. Guests include WUNC reporter Rusty Jacobs; John Burness, senior vice president of public and government relations at Duke University; Mukhtar Raqib, student body president, North Carolina Central University; Daniel Bowes, community liaison for Duke student government; and Dorcas Bradley of the Southwest Central Durham Quality of Life Project.


Title: Durham: A Self-Portrait
Web address: http://wunc.org/tsot/archive/sot1127b07.mp3/view?searchterm=durham
Date: Tuesday, November 27 2007
Description: A clandestine basketball game played between white and black college students; a deep understanding among black and white elites that allowed each community to flourish; and, a Jewish man elected mayor in 1950. It was unheard of for such events to occur in the Jim Crow South, but they happened in Durham. A new documentary explores Durham’s emergence, post-Reconstruction, as a model city of the new South. Filmmaker Steve Channing joins host Frank Stasio to discussion the social and political underpinnings of Durham’s remarkable history.


Title: Durham Carolers
Web address: http://wunc.org/tsot/archive/sot1222c.mp3/view?searchterm=durham
Date: Friday, December 22 2006
Description: The Durham Carolers’ sonorous voices delight groups across the Triangle during the holidays, from the Kiwanis Club to the University Club. Ervin Worthy, Andre Montgomery, Tony Alston, Richard Butler, Nathaniel McLaughlin Sr. and Nathaniel McLaughlin Jr. join host Frank Stasio in the studio to share their a cappella holiday harmonies.


Title: Durham Jazz
Web address: http://www.ibiblio.org/wunc_archives/sot/?p=404
Description: Melinda Penkava talks about jazz and what makes a good jazz scene with John Brown, bass player and professor of music at Duke University; Baron Tymas, guitar player and professor at North Carolina Central University; and Ray Codrington, a trumpet player. (17:30)


Title: Durham Nativity School
Web address: http://wunc.org/programs/news/archive/NDD031008DURHAM_NATIVITY.mp3/view?searchterm=durham
Date: Monday, March 10 2008
Description: African-American boys are more at risk of falling through the cracks of the public education system than any other group. And the most vulnerable age for these young men is middle school when school can become a chore and destructive habits can ruin their future.

It’s with these two thoughts in mind that Doctor Joseph Moylan founded The Durham Nativity School in 2002. The school is based on a 30-year old model and offers students from low-income backgrounds a path to success. Tuition is free at the middle school, and all graduates receive scholarships to private high schools and the colleges of their choice. But even with that incentive, the road for many of the students is long and hard. Dave DeWitt reports.


Title: Durham Performing Arts Center
Web address: http://wunc.org/programs/news/archive/Sli1201.mp3/view?searchterm=durham
Date: Monday, December 01 2008
Description: The long-awaited Durham Performing Arts Center is open for business – even in a tight economy. It sits in eye shot of several major economic development projects in downtown – like American Tobacco. Zoe Voigt of Durham is impressed:
“I think it’s beautiful, I love all the glass and how from a distance as we were driving up, it was lit up, and it just looked bright and beautiful especially on this gray dreary night.”
The facility cost 44-million dollars and took two years to build – opening in one of the tightest economies in years. But that didn’t stop people from pouring in last night to see the inaugural performance – BB King.


Title: Face Up
Web address: http://wunc.org/tsot/archive/sot0912b08.mp3/view?searchterm=durham
Date: Friday, September 12 2008
Description: Downtown Durham has become a bit brighter thanks to artist Brett Cook. With a diverse army of community volunteers, Cook has completed several colorful murals that both honor the history of the Bull City and signal a brilliant future for Durham. Cook is a visiting artist at Duke University’s Center for Documentary Studies and he joins host Frank Stasio to talk about the intersection between art and social engagement.


Title: Father McBriar
Web address: http://www.ibiblio.org/wunc_archives/sot/?p=309
Description: In July, Father David McBriar retired from The Immaculate Conception Church in Durham. Prior to his nine years leading that church, he spent nine years as a Priest at Saint Francis of Assisi Church in Raleigh. Host Melinda Penkava talks to Father McBriar about his experience as a Fransiscan Priest in two very different churches.


Title: Fixing the teacher shortage
Web address: http://wunc.org/tsot/archive/sot0914a.mp3/view?searchterm=durham
Date: Thursday, September 14 2006
Description: North Carolina Central University has agreed to provide thirteen professors to teach math and science at Durham’s Southern High School. Host Frank Stasio discusses the challenges and benefits of the collaboration with Fred Williams of Durham Public Schools, NCCU provost Beverly Jones, and principal Rod Teal of Southern High School.


Title: The Future of Durham
Web address: http://www.ibiblio.org/wunc_archives/sot/?p=410
Description: Urban revitalization is the buzz around cities across the U.S. It’s no longer out with the old and in with the new. In this latest trend developers are transforming urban wastelands into hip yet historic districts. Host Melinda Penkava looks at the hope and hype of urban revitalization with: Diane Pledger, president of the Hayti Center; Andrew Rothschild, a developer; and Bob Ashley, editor of the Durham Herald-Sun. Listener Call-In. (59:00)


Title: Indie Record Labels
Web address: http://www.ibiblio.org/wunc_archives/sot/?p=511
Description: When Dolly Parton wanted to return to her bluegrass roots, instead of going with a major record label, she went with an independent one — Durham’s Sugar Hill Records. Why are the big names going with the little guys? Host Eric Hodge speaks with Bev Paul, General Manager of Sugar Hill Records; Mac McCaughan, co-owner of Merge Records; Glenn Dicker, label manager at Yep Roc Records; and Steve Balcom, partner at The Splinter Group in Carrboro about surviving and thriving in the music business. Listener Call-In. (59:00)


Title: Kim Arrington
Web address: http://www.ibiblio.org/wunc_archives/sot/?p=391
Description: Host Frank Stasio speaks with Kim Arrington, who uses poetry to spread her healing message to the African-American community in Durham. Her latest compilation, “The Lapis Dwellers,” is an introspective exploration of what it means to be both black and a woman in America. She joins us in the studio to talk about her poetry and her passion for Durham’s communities. (12:00)


Title: Life on Mars
Web address: http://wunc.org/tsot/archive/sot1220b.mp3/view?searchterm=durham
Date: Wednesday, December 20 2006
Description: Durham photographer Jean-Christian Rostagni’s documentary images of American culture and politics are meant to serve as a wake-up call to the American people, whom he believes live in a state of blissful ignorance. He joins host Frank Stasio to discuss both the subtle and overt messages in his new exhibit, “Life on Mars, Part I,” on display now at Through This Lens gallery in downtown Durham. View the exhibit online here.


Title: Mamadou Diabate
Web address: http://www.ibiblio.org/wunc_archives/sot/?p=485
Description: For seven centuries, members of the Mandinka West African jeli caste of musicians have been preserving its culture through music. Jeli member Mamadou Diabate’s second album, Behmanka, which features both traditional and original music played by Mamadou, is a 2005 grammy nominee for best traditional world album. The album features Mamadou Diabate playing his kora, a 21-stringed gourd instrument. Host Frank Stasio talks with Durham resident musician Mamadou Diabate. (40:00)


Title: The Mantra Trailer
Web address: http://wunc.org/tsot/archive/sot0313c.mp3/view?searchterm=durham
Date: Tuesday, March 13 2007
Description: Durham audio artist Sherri Wood harnesses the power of language in her latest project: The mantra trailer. It’s a 1950’s era camper that’s been transformed into a meditative space in which people can record their personal mantras. When they are broadcast online and outdoors the private chants become public discourse.


Title: Meet Joseph Henderson
Web address: http://wunc.org/tsot/archive/sot0219a.mp3/view?searchterm=durham
Date: Monday, February 19 2007
Description: From the complexities of math, to the tragedies of gang banging, Joseph Henderson has devoted his life to teaching through theater. The founder of the Walltown Children’s Theater in Durham joins host Frank Stasio in the studio to talk about where he got his passion for the stage.


Title: Meet Joseph Moylan
Web address: http://wunc.org/tsot/archive/sot0310a08.mp3/view?searchterm=durham
Date: Monday, March 10 2008
Description: Six years ago Joseph Moylan had an idea to start a school that would educate future community leaders. The Durham Nativity School’s mission is a tough one: prepare students from low-income backgrounds for a life of higher education and giving back. We’ll find out how it’s working when we meet Dr. Joseph Moylan.


Title: Merck Plant Expansion in Durham
Web address: http://wunc.org/programs/news/archive/Sli0620.mp3for_web.mp3/view
Date: Friday, June 20 2008
Description: The Merck vaccine manufacturing plant in Durham is about to get bigger. Leoneda Inge reports.
Construction on the first phase of the Merck facility began in 2004. Workers would fill vials with vaccine shipped frozen from Pennsylvania. It was mostly children’s vaccines – Measles, Mumps, Rubella and Chicken Pox. The second phase was packaging the vials for shipment.
Merck plant manager John Wagner says in Phase three, the Durham plant will now make the vaccine.
“You know we’ve had excellent success in getting highly skilled workers that we need to run a plant like this and that’s why we’ve continued to expand as we’ve got confidence that this area can continue to support the growing vaccine business that we have.”
The expansion will mean at least 150 more workers – bringing the total at the facility to 400.


Title: Nnenna Freelon
Web address: http://www.ibiblio.org/wunc_archives/sot/?p=448
Description: The latest album by Durham jazz artist Nnenna Freelon tells a new story about the great jazz singer, Billie Holiday. Famous for her singular sound and her tragic life, Billie Holiday has inspired countless musicians. Freelon’s interpretation of her work brings out Holiday’s courage and originality. Host Frank Stasio talks with Nnenna Freelon about the new album, “Blueprint of a Lady: Sketches of Billie Holiday.” (59:00)

(This is a re-broadcast of a show that first aired on Aug. 24, 2005.)


Title: Pink Flag
Web address: http://wunc.org/tsot/archive/sot1107c08.mp3/view?searchterm=durham
Date: Friday, November 07 2008
Description: The women of Durham-based band Pink Flag never received the memo that real ladies aren’t supposed to like loud music. The trio likes rock tunes that are hard, full of attitude and played at full volume. The members of Pink Flag are making waves on the punk music scene in North Carolina with their energetic stage performances and the upcoming release of their first CD. The band joins host Frank Stasio to talk about their sound, thriving in a male-dominated genre of music, and to rock the studio live.


Title: Public Forum
Web address: http://www.ibiblio.org/wunc_archives/sot/?p=715
Description: Are high schools failing our students? Or are they better than ever? We kick off our series “North Carolina Voices: Studying High School” with a public forum looking at the state of high schools. Hosted by Frank Stasio and recorded last month, guests include: Howard Lee, chairman of the North Carolina Board of Education; Willie Gilchrist, superintendent at Halifax County Schools; Steve Unruhe, teacher at Riverside H.S. in Durham; and Tony Habit, executive director, The New Schools Project. (59:00)


Title: Race, Class & Sex in Durham
Web address: http://wunc.org/programs/news/archive/Nli052406.mp3/view?searchterm=durham
Date: Wednesday, May 24 2006
Description: Religious leaders, advocates against sexual assault, professors and the media will gather in Durham today to address issues raised by the Duke Lacrosse case. The gathering is called “The Durham Conference on the Moral Challenges of our Culture.” Many in the community say the alleged rape of a black woman by white members of the Duke Lacrosse team has exposed underlying tensions of race and class in Durham. Leoneda Inge reports.


Title: Re-drawing Jordan Lake
Web address: http://wunc.org/tsot/archive/sot0107a09.mp3/view?searchterm=durham
Date: Wednesday, January 07 2009
Description: Durham and Chatham counties are facing off over a proposed mega-development near Jordan Lake. Chatham County Commissioners are appealing to North Carolina’s Division of Water Quality to retain the lake’s current boundaries, but Durham County wants them redrawn. Matt Saldaña, staff writer at the Independent Weekly, joins host Frank Stasio to discuss the latest developments.


Title: Richard Brodhead
Web address: http://www.ibiblio.org/wunc_archives/sot/?p=402
Description: Duke University employs almost 28,000 people, and the school’s economic impact on the Durham region is estimated at almost $3 billion per year. What would Durham be without Duke? Or Duke without Durham? Host Melinda Penkava speaks with Duke University President Richard Brodhead about town/gown realtions and other issues facing higher education. Listener Call-In. (59:00)


Title: Sam Wells
Web address: http://wunc.org/tsot/archive/sam-wells/view?searchterm=durham
Date: Monday, December 25 2006
Description: His latest books and essays deal with the culture of sex, homosexuality in the church, and the simple task of taking on politics and morality. Host Frank Stasio speaks with Sam Wells, dean of Duke Chapel, about his first year in Durham.


Title: Teens Talk
Web address: http://www.ibiblio.org/wunc_archives/sot/?p=716
Description: While parents and policymakers are consumed with the academic component of high school, students have much more than tests and grades on their minds. Host Frank Stasio recently sat down with ten students from Riverside High School in Durham to ask about their biggest concerns. On the next State of Things, from gossip and conformity, to staying safe and staying out of trouble…teenagers talk about high school. The conversation is part of the series “North Carolina Voices: Studying High School.” (59:00)


Title: Tipplers and Drunkards
Web address: http://www.ibiblio.org/wunc_archives/sot/?p=331
Description: Archie Smith, Durham County Superior Clerk of Courts stumbled upon some 19th and early 20th century legal documents collecting dust at the Durham County Courthouse. The old papers tell the stories of church drunkards, “tipplers” and others around the turn of the century. Host Frank Stasio talks with Archie Smith about the documents. (6:00)


Title: Upbuilding Black Durham
Web address: http://wunc.org/tsot/archive/sot0203c09.mp3/view?searchterm=durham
Date: Tuesday, February 03 2009
Description: In her new book, “Upbuilding Black Durham,” (UNC Press/2008) Leslie Brown meticulously details the history of Durham’s Black middle class including the important role of women and Black-owned businesses like North Carolina Mutual. Leslie Brown joins host Frank Stasio to talk about the historic coming together of gender, class and community in the Jim Crow South.


Title: Welcome to Durham
Web address: http://www.ibiblio.org/wunc_archives/sot/?p=401
Description: For our first broadcast from the new North Carolina Public Radio studios at the American Tobacco Historic District in Durham, we look at our new home city. What makes Durham tick? Host Melinda Penkava explores the city that is home to Duke University, North Carolina Central University, the Durham Bulls, a flourishing intellectual community, crime problems, and Black Wall Street (to name just a few) with: Jim Wise, columnist for the Durham News; Eddie Davis, president of the North Carolina Association of Educators and a longtime teacher at Hillside High School; and Nick Tennyson, mayor of Durham from 1997-2001 and executive vice president of the Homebuilders Association of f Durham and Orange Counties. Listener Call-In. (59:00)


Title: Welcome to Durham
Web address: http://wunc.org/tsot/archive/sot0118b.mp3/view?searchterm=durham
Date: Thursday, January 18 2007
Description: What started out as a way to promote a new record label turned into a labor of love and a community outreach effort for “Welcome to Durham, USA” executive producer Mike Wilson and producer Christopher “Play” Martin. They join host Frank Stasio to discuss the newly released documentary, which explores how a violent subculture sprang up around impoverished neighborhoods in Durham and what community leaders are doing to quell it.


Title: What’s Wrong With Boys?
Web address: http://www.ibiblio.org/wunc_archives/sot/?p=723
Description: As girls continue to outperform boys in public schools, single-sex education is gaining traction as the next big reform movement. Host Frank Stasio welcomes co-host Corey Webster, a senior at Durham’s Riverside High School. Together, they speak to: Rosemary Salomone, St. John’s University law professor and author of, “Same, Different, Equal: Rethinking Single-Sex Education” (Yale University Press/2003) about the so-called boy crisis in education. Russell Harper, principal of North Carolina A&T Middle College, and Elizabeth Hudgins, senior director of policy and research at Action for Children North Carolina, weigh in on what’s being done in North Carolina to help disadvantaged boys succeed in school. Listener call-in. (59:00)


Title: Why Teach?
Web address: http://www.ibiblio.org/wunc_archives/sot/?p=724
Description: Teachers are often caught between increasing pressure from administrators to improve academic performance and low pay. So why would someone teach? And what is the future of the teaching profession? As part of the series “North Carolina Voices: Studying High School” we present a live forum on teaching. Host Frank Stasio is joined by: Eddie Davis, English teacher at Hillside High School in Durham and the current president of the North Carolina Association of Educators; Melinda Chambless, a Teach for America teacher, who is about to complete her first year teaching biology at Warren County High School in Warrenton; April Tisdale, a 10-year veteran social studies teacher who has been at Enloe Magnet High School in Raleigh for the past seven years; and Kenneth Dobyns, a teacher in the Freshmen Academy at West Johnston High School in Benson.. The discussion will be presented as a public forum in Bay 7 of the American Tobacco Historic District. It is free and open to the public. (59:00)


Title: Youth Document Durham
Web address: http://wunc.org/tsot/archive/sot072106b.mp3/view?searchterm=durham
Date: Friday, July 21 2006
Description: Local teenagers spent the early part of the summer recording their lives for the “Youth Document Durham” project at the Center for Documentary Studies. Host Frank Stasio talks with program coordinator Tennessee Watson and two of her students about the stories they produced, which include fitting in with the right clothes to getting out of gangs.


Title: Zippy Returns
Web address: http://www.ibiblio.org/wunc_archives/sot/?p=526
Description: Host Eric Hodge speaks with Durham-based, best-selling author Haven Kimmel. Haven’s new book, “She Got Up Off The Couch” (Free Press/2006) is a sequel to her memoir, “A Girl Named Zippy” (Doubleday/2001), a book that delighted readers with its witty tales from Mooreland, Indiana. Haven is also the author of two novels, “The Solace of Leaving Early” (Anchor/2003) and “Something Rising (Light and Swift)” (Free Press/2005), as well as a children’s book, “Orville: A Dog’s Story” (Clarion Books/2003). (35:00)


Preservation Durham Lunch and Learn Panel Discussions

Title: 2003: From Crossroads to Community: The People Behind Bahama (panel discussion)
Panel members: Shirley Mallard, Alton Mangum, Gwen Lyons Rountree, Dr. Marie Roberts, Merle Umstead, Richey, Judy Crabtree, John Bittikofer, Dianne Bittikofer
Publisher: Preservation Durham
Date: April 29, 2003
Format: 2 minidisks


Title: African American Women
Publisher: Preservation Durham
Date: 9/17/2003
Format: cassette tape


Interviewee: Kate Dobbs Ariail
Interviewers: Cynthia Satterfield, Perry Pike
Publisher: Historic Preservation Society of Durham
Date: March 13, 2003


Title: Architecture (Preservation Durham walking tour planning discussion)
Interviewees: n/a
Publisher: Preservation Durham
Date: September 5, 2002
Format: 3 cassette tapes


Title: Arts and Culture (Preservation Durham walking tour planning discussion)
Interviewees: n/a
Publisher: Preservation Durham
Date: June 17, 2002
Format: 5 cassette tapes, 5 digital audiotapes


Title: BC to Barcodes: Durham’s Most and Least Known Inventions (program)
Speakers: Reyn Bowman, Carol Council Smith
Publisher: Preservation Durham
Date: February 20, 2008
Format: minidisk


Title: The Birth of Research Triangle Park (panel discussion)
Panel members: Elizabeth Rooks, C.X. Larrabee, Pearson Stewart
Publisher: Preservation Durham
Date: September 20, 2006
Format: minidisk


Title: The Blues and Durham’s Tobacco Warehouses (program)
Speaker: Glen Hinson
Publisher: Preservation Durham
Date: November 20, 2002
Format: minidisk


Title: Carr History (program)
Speakers: Albert Carr, Mena Webb
Publisher: Preservation Durham
Date: November 19, 2003
Format: 2 cassette tapes, 1 minidisk


Title: Civil Rights (Preservation Durham walking tour planning discussion)
Interviewees: Jack Preiss, Jeanne Lucas, Cynthia Sutterfield, R. Kelly Bryant, Barbara Lau, Ben Speller J Interviewers: Perry Pike, John Compton
Publisher: Preservation Durham
Date: July 12, 2002
Format: transcript, 5 dats, 5 cassettes


Title: Cotton Mill Village in Durham (program)
Speaker: John Schelp
Publisher: Preservation Durham
Date: February 15, 2006
Format: 1 cassette tape, 1 minidisk


Title: Creating Camp Butner (panel discussion)
Panel members: Jim Wise, John McKeown, Grady Veasey, Spud Parker
Source: Preservation Durham
Date: January 17, 2007
Format: minidisk


Title: Downtown Development (annual meeting)
Speaker: Mike Lemanski
Publisher: Historic Preservation Society of Durham
Date: March 14, 1999
Format: 2 cassette tapes


Title: Durham Bulls Centennial (program)
Speaker: Matt Demargel
Publisher: Preservation Durham
Format: cassette tape, minidisk


Title: Durham Catalog Houses: Sears, Lustron, Others (program)
Speaker: Tom Miller
Publisher: Preservation Durham
Date: February 18, 2004
Format: 1 cassette tape, 1 minidisk


Title: Durham During WWII (panel discussion)
Panel members: Patricia H. Coman and others
Publisher: Preservation Durham
Date: October 10, 2003
Format: 1 cassette tape, 1 minidisk


Title: Durham’s Intriguing Place Names, or Why Does Durham Have Six Chapel Hill Streets? (program)
Speaker: Tom Miller
Publisher: Preservation Durham
Date: April 19, 2006
Format: 1 cassette tape, 1 minidisk


Title: Dying in Durham (panel discussion)
Panel members: J.C. (Skeepie) Scarborough, Mike Poole, Tom Tully, Steve Sager, Matthew Ramadan, Milton Jordan, Karen Stewart, Jim Sutton
Publisher: Preservation Durham
Date: April 16, 2008
Format: minidisk


Title: Early String Band Music in Durham (program)
Speakers: Jon C. Newlin, Amy N Davis
Publisher: Preservation Durham
Date: May 19, 2004
Format: 1 minidisk


Title: East Durham History (panel discussion)
Panel members: Dan Fuller, William Burcham, Alese Pollard Stetson
Publisher: Historic Preservation Society of Durham
Date: September 20, 2005
Format: 2 cassette tapes, 2 digital audiotapes


Title: Fields to Meals: History of Farmer’s Markets (panel discussion)
Interviewees: Elizabeth Gibb, Christine DeNer, R. Gaines Steer, Brenda Brodie
Publisher: Preservation Durham
Date: November 15, 2006
Format: minidisk


Title: Forest Hills (panel discussion)
Persons Interviewed: n/a
Publisher: Preservation Durham
Date: April 27, 2004
Format: 1 cassette`tape


Title: Groundbreaking Women in Durham Politics (panel discussion)
Panel members: Diane Catotti, Margaret Keller, Sylvia Kerckhoff, Sandra Ogburn, Mary Duke Biddle Trent Semans, Diane Wright
Publisher: Preservation Durham
Date: November 15, 2005
Format: 2 minidisks, 3 cassettes


Title: Growing up on Dillard and Holloway Streets (panel discussion)
Panel members: Harrrell Tice, Albert G. Carr, Ned Newsome, Jack Schrader
Publisher: Preservation Durham
Date: April 13, 2003
Format: 4 compact discs, minidisks


Title: Historic Hangouts of Durham (panel discussion)
Panel members: Richard Hart, Chief Steve Chalmers, Chief Ronald Allen, Aaron Moore
Publisher: Preservation Durham
Date: January 18, 2006
Format: 1 cassette tape


Title: Historic Hangouts of Durham (panel discussion)
Panel members: n/a
Publisher: Preservation Durham
Date: May 18, 2005
Format: 1 minidisk


Title: A History of Black Wall Street (program)
Speaker: Howard Clement
Publisher: Preservation Durham
Date: March 19, 2003
Format: minidisk


Title: History of Gospel Music in Durham (panel discussion)
Panel members: Accie Caldwell Jr., Tony Landis, Carl Kenney, Wayne Ker, Marc Lee, Emmanuel Landis
Publisher: Preservation Durham
Date: 2/16/2005
Format: 2 cassettes, 1 minidisc


Title: History of I-85 (program)
Speakers: Sandy Ogburn, Tom Magnuson
Publisher: Preservation Durham
Date: October 18, 2006
Format: minidisk


Title: The Influence of the Tobacco and Textile industries on Downtown Architecture (program)
Speaker: Frank DePasquale
Publisher: Preservation Durham
Date: May 21, 2003
Format: minidisk


Interviewee: Walker Jones
Interviewers: Barbara Lau, Perry Pike
Publisher: Historic Preservation Society of Durham
Date: January 15, 2002
Format: transcript


Title: Lakewood Amusement Park (program)
Speaker: Jim Wise
Publisher: Preservation Durham
Date: April 21, 2004
Format: transcript, 1 cassette tape, 1 minidisk


Title: Maplewood Cemetery Stories (panel discussion)
Panel members: Bill Coman, Milo Pyne, Jim Wise
Moderator: Perry Pike
Publisher: Historic Preservation Society of Durham
Date: March 15, 2003
Format: cassette tape


Title: Memories of Race Relations in Durham (program)
Speakers: Olga Dean, Preston Hall
Publisher: Preservation Durham
Date: November 1, 2005
Format: transcript


Title: Negro League Baseball (program)
Speaker: Artis Plummer
Publisher: Preservation Durham
Date: October 24, 2004
Format: 1 cassette tape, 1 minidisk


Title: No Museum to New Museum: Creating a History Museum for Durham (program)
Speakers: Brent Ward, Katie Painter
Publisher: Preservation Durham
Date: March 19, 2008
Format: minidisk


Title: Old North Durham (panel discussion)
Panel members: Ellen Cosley, Tucker Parrish, Mildred and Dillard Teer, Walker Stone, Caroline Meade Wright
Publisher: Preservation Durham
Date: April 29, 2006
Format: 1 cassette tape


Title: Parrish Street
Interviewees: n/a
Publisher: Preservation Durham
Date: September 11, 2002
Format: 2 cassette tapes


Title: Parrish Street (panel discussion)
Persons Interviewed: Ellen Cassilly, Tucker Parrish, Walker Stone, Caroline Meade Wright, Mildred Teer, Dillard Teer
Publisher: Preservation Durham
Date: September 21, 2005
Format: 2 cassette tapes, 1 minidisk


Title: Parrish Street Project Opening Ceremonies (program)
Interviewees: Chris Dickey, Victor Gordon, John Compton, Patrick Baker, Bill Bell, Nathan Garner, John Hope Franklin
Publisher: Preservation Durham
Date: January 18, 2007
Format: minidisk


Title: Pauli Murray and the Fitzgeralds
Interviewees: Barbara Lau, William Fitzgerald, Dwyain Davis, Stephanie Davis, Melodie Cooper
Publisher: Preservation Durham
Date: February 21, 2007
Format: minidisk


Title: Preservation Economic Engine Good Urban Planning (program)
Speaker: Joe Relley
Publisher: Preservation Durham
Date: September 5, 2007
Format: minidisk


Title: Redeveloping Central Park District in Durham (panel discussion)
Panel members: Lucian Roughton, Corbin Anderson, Christina Graham, Bob Chapman, Walker Stone, Mike Lemanski, Alice Sharp
Publisher: Preservation Durham
Date: April 18, 2007
Format: minidisk


Title: Reflections of Mayor Wense Grabarek (program)
Speaker: Wense Grabarek
Publisher: Preservation Durham
Date: September 18, 2007
Format: minidisk


Title: Rhine Research Center (panel discussion)
Persons Interviewed: Dr. Sally Feather, Dr. Christine Simmons
Publisher: Preservation Durham
Date: November 17, 2004
Format:


Title: Royal Ice Cream Parlor Sit-In (program)
Panel members: R. Kelly Bryant, Howard Margolis, Floyd McKissick
Publisher: Preservation Durham
Date: October 17, 2007
Format: md


Title: Sociology of the Twentieth Century Kitchen (program)
Speaker: Tom Miller
Publisher: Preservation Durham
Date: January 19, 2005
Format:


Title: Stanford L. Warren: History of the Durham Colored Library (program)
Speaker: Brenda Watson-Hall
Publisher: Preservation Durham
Date: November 14, 2007
Format: minidisk


Title: South Durham: Leigh Farm and Lowes Grove (program)
Panel members: Gus Godwin, Curtis Booker, Rozetta Radkey, Phil Evans
Publisher: Preservation Durham
Date: January 16, 2008
Format: minidisk


Title: Tobacco Heritage (Preservation Durham walking tour planning discussion)
Interviewees: n/a
Publisher: Preservation Durham
Date: March 19, 2002
Format: 3 cassette tapes


Title: Trinity Tour Roundtable (panel discussion)
Panel members: n/a
Publisher: Preservation Durham
Date: May 1, 2007
Format: minidisk


Title: Urban Renewal: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly (program)
Speaker: Yonah Freemark
Publisher: Preservation Durham
Date: March 16, 2006
Format: 2 cassette tapes, 1 minidisk


Title: The Way It Used to Be: What It Was Like to Grow up Black in the Bull City (program)
Speaker: R. Kelly Bryant, Jr.
Publisher: Preservation Durham
Date: January 15, 2003
Format: cassette tape, minidisk


Title: When the Rose Bowl Came to Durham (program)
Speaker: Bill King
Publisher: Preservation Durham
Date: March 17, 2004
Format: 1 cassette tape, 1 minidisk


Title: A Worker’s Perspective on Remembering American Tobacco (panel discussion)
Panel members: Kevin Bailey, Leon Branch, John Ribet, Doris, Mallarel
Publisher: Preservation Durham
Date: January 21, 2004
Format: 1 cassette tape, 1 minidisk

 

Updated  November 15, 2013.